472

I am trying to do something in Java and I need something to wait / delay for an amount of seconds in a while loop.

while (true) {
    if (i == 3) {
        i = 0;
    }

    ceva[i].setSelected(true);

    // I need to wait here

    ceva[i].setSelected(false);

    // I need to wait here

    i++;
}

I want to build a step sequencer and I'm new to Java. Any suggestions?

5
  • 25
    Use Thread.Sleep().
    – Tiny
    Jun 8 '14 at 8:28
  • 3
    Consider to use a Timer
    – PeterMmm
    Jun 8 '14 at 8:32
  • 3
    What is the purpose of waiting? Are you waiting for a certain event to happen? Make sure you understand what sleep() method does
    – artdanil
    Jun 8 '14 at 8:37
  • 1
    @Tiny, it's NOT safe. Sep 16 '17 at 19:35
  • 17
    It is actually Thread.sleep(<milisecondsToSleep>). The s shouldn't be capitalized.
    – Jade
    Sep 26 '17 at 16:21
914
+250

If you want to pause then use java.util.concurrent.TimeUnit:

TimeUnit.SECONDS.sleep(1);

To sleep for one second or

TimeUnit.MINUTES.sleep(1);

To sleep for a minute.

As this is a loop, this presents an inherent problem - drift. Every time you run code and then sleep you will be drifting a little bit from running, say, every second. If this is an issue then don't use sleep.

Further, sleep isn't very flexible when it comes to control.

For running a task every second or at a one second delay I would strongly recommend a ScheduledExecutorService and either scheduleAtFixedRate or scheduleWithFixedDelay.

For example, to run the method myTask every second (Java 8):

public static void main(String[] args) {
    final ScheduledExecutorService executorService = Executors.newSingleThreadScheduledExecutor();
    executorService.scheduleAtFixedRate(App::myTask, 0, 1, TimeUnit.SECONDS);
}

private static void myTask() {
    System.out.println("Running");
}

And in Java 7:

public static void main(String[] args) {
    final ScheduledExecutorService executorService = Executors.newSingleThreadScheduledExecutor();
    executorService.scheduleAtFixedRate(new Runnable() {
        @Override
        public void run() {
            myTask();
        }
    }, 0, 1, TimeUnit.SECONDS);
}

private static void myTask() {
    System.out.println("Running");
}
8
  • 1
    @Matthew Moisen I couldn't get this Java 8 example to run. What is App:: exactly? By changing myTask() to a runnable lambda it works: Runnable myTask = () -> {...};
    – comfytoday
    Dec 5 '17 at 23:52
  • 3
    It's a method reference @comfytoday - I suggest starting with the documentation. Dec 6 '17 at 7:25
  • 1
    TimeUnit.SECONDS.wait(1) is throwing IllegalMonitorStateException in Java 8.1 build 31 on Windows 6.3. Instead, I'm able to use Thread.sleep(1000) without a try/catch.
    – John Meyer
    Jan 5 '18 at 19:31
  • 1
    In Java 8, in java.util.concurrent.TimeUnit you get Unhandled exception: java.lang.InterruptedExecution for the sleep(1)
    – Shai Alon
    Aug 14 '19 at 12:11
  • 1
    You must surround the TimeUnit.SECONDS.sleep(1); with try catch
    – Shai Alon
    Aug 14 '19 at 12:13
185

Use Thread.sleep(1000);

1000 is the number of milliseconds that the program will pause.

try
{
    Thread.sleep(1000);
}
catch(InterruptedException ex)
{
    Thread.currentThread().interrupt();
}
3
  • 7
    Don't forget to log the InterruptedException or you will never know this thread got interrupted.
    – m0skit0
    Nov 15 '16 at 9:49
  • 22
    I'm curious as to what the Thread.currentThread().interrupt(); does here.
    – Brent212
    Aug 15 '18 at 21:41
  • 4
    see : "Why do we have to interrupt the thread again?" here : javaspecialists.eu/archive/Issue056.html
    – Tristan
    Dec 3 '18 at 15:29
15

Use this:

public static void wait(int ms)
{
    try
    {
        Thread.sleep(ms);
    }
    catch(InterruptedException ex)
    {
        Thread.currentThread().interrupt();
    }
}

and, then you can call this method anywhere like:

wait(1000);
1
  • 1
    What does Thread.currentThread().interrupt(); do? Why is it important? Jul 19 at 6:57
9

You need to use the Thread.sleep() call.

More info here: http://docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/essential/concurrency/sleep.html

0
5

Using TimeUnit.SECONDS.sleep(1); or Thread.sleep(1000); Is acceptable way to do it. In both cases you have to catch InterruptedExceptionwhich makes your code Bulky.There is an Open Source java library called MgntUtils (written by me) that provides utility that already deals with InterruptedException inside. So your code would just include one line:

TimeUtils.sleepFor(1, TimeUnit.SECONDS);

See the javadoc here. You can access library from Maven Central or from Github. The article explaining about the library could be found here

2
  • 5
    Using catch (InterruptedException e) { /* empty */ } is NOT a sensible solution here. At the very least, you should provide some log information. For more information about the subject, see javaspecialists.eu/archive/Issue056.html
    – Marco13
    Aug 19 '18 at 18:37
  • @Marco13 Actually due to your comment and comments from some other people I modified the method TimeUtils.sleepFor() and now it interrupts current thread. So, it is still convenient in a way that you don't need to catch the InterruptedException, but the interruption mechanism now works. May 10 at 15:42
5

Use Thread.sleep(100);. The unit of time is milliseconds

For example:

public class SleepMessages {
    public static void main(String args[])
        throws InterruptedException {
        String importantInfo[] = {
            "Mares eat oats",
            "Does eat oats",
            "Little lambs eat ivy",
            "A kid will eat ivy too"
        };

        for (int i = 0;
             i < importantInfo.length;
             i++) {
            //Pause for 4 seconds
            Thread.sleep(4000);
            //Print a message
            System.out.println(importantInfo[i]);
        }
    }
}
1

I know this is a very old post but this may help someone: You can create a method, so whenever you need to pause you can type pause(1000) or any other millisecond value:

public static void pause(int ms) {
    try {
        Thread.sleep(ms);
    } catch (InterruptedException e) {
        System.err.format("IOException: %s%n", e);
    }
}

This is inserted just above the public static void main(String[] args), inside the class. Then, to call on the method, type pause(ms) but replace ms with the number of milliseconds to pause. That way, you don't have to insert the entire try-catch statement whenever you want to pause.

1
  • Looking at the almost same answer by @Hecanet there is no Thread.currentThread().interrupt(); If it is important why is it not shown? - If it is not important why would it be inserted/omitted? Jul 19 at 6:59

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