148

I'd like to create an abstract function in swift language. Is it possible?

class BaseClass {
    func abstractFunction() {
        // How do I force this function to be overridden?
    }
}

class SubClass : BaseClass {
    override func abstractFunction() {
        // Override
    }
}
4
  • This is pretty close to your other question but the answer here seems a little better. Commented Jun 8, 2014 at 20:39
  • The questions are similar but the solutions are far different because a abstract class has different use cases than an abstract function.
    – kev
    Commented Jun 8, 2014 at 20:43
  • Yep, why I didn't vote to close either, but the answers there won't be useful beyond "you can't" Here you got the best available answer :) Commented Jun 8, 2014 at 20:47
  • Solved stackoverflow.com/a/65816990/294884
    – Fattie
    Commented Nov 4, 2023 at 19:08

11 Answers 11

233

There no concept of abstract in Swift (like Objective-C) but you can do this :

class BaseClass {
    func abstractFunction() {
        preconditionFailure("This method must be overridden") 
    } 
}

class SubClass : BaseClass {
     override func abstractFunction() {
         // Override
     } 
}
11
  • 13
    Alternatively you can use assert(false, "This method must be overriden by the subclass").
    – Erik
    Commented Jun 8, 2014 at 20:20
  • 24
    or fatalError("This method must be overridden")
    – nathan
    Commented Jun 8, 2014 at 20:20
  • 6
    assertions will require a return statement when a method has a return type. I think fatalError() is better for this one reason Commented Jul 5, 2014 at 0:15
  • 9
    Also there is preconditionFailure("Bla bla bla") in Swift which will execute in release builds and also eliminates the need of a return statement. EDIT: Just found out that this method basically is equal to fatalError() but it's the more proper way (Better documentation, introduced in Swift along with precondition(), assert() and assertionFailure(), read here)
    – Kametrixom
    Commented May 15, 2015 at 19:59
  • 2
    what if the function has a return type?
    – LoveMeow
    Commented May 21, 2015 at 21:10
38

What you want is not a base class, but a protocol.

protocol MyProtocol {
    func abstractFunction()
}

class MyClass : MyProtocol {
    func abstractFunction() {
    }
}

If you don't supply abstractFunction in your class it's an error.

If you still need the baseclass for other behaviour, you can do this:

class MyClass : BaseClass, MyProtocol {
    func abstractFunction() {
    }
}
10
  • 33
    This doesn't quite work. If BaseClass wants to call those empty functions, then it would also have to implement the protocol, and then implement the functions. Also the subclass still isn't forced to implement the functions at compile time, and you not compelled to implement the protocol either. Commented Dec 30, 2014 at 17:05
  • 8
    That's my point.... BaseClass has nothing to do with the protocol, and to act like an abstract class it should have something to do with it. To clarify what I wrote "If BaseClass wants to call those empty functions, then it would also have to implement the protocol which would force you to implement the functions - which then leads to the Subclass not being forced to implement the functions at compile time, because the BaseClass has already done it". Commented Dec 30, 2014 at 17:35
  • 4
    That really depends on how you define "abstract". The whole point of an abstract function is that you can put it on a class that can do normal class things. For example, the reason I want this is because I need to define a static member which you can't seem to do with protocols. So it's hard for me to see that this meets the useful point of an abstract function.
    – Puppy
    Commented Sep 11, 2015 at 11:21
  • 4
    I think the concern with the upvoted comments above is that this does not conform to the Liskov Substitution principle which states "objects in a program should be replaceable with instances of their subtypes without altering the correctness of that program." It's assumed this is an abstract type. This is particularly important in the case of Factory Method pattern where the base class is responsible for creating and storing properties that originate from the sub class. Commented Nov 19, 2015 at 16:27
  • 2
    An abstract base class and a protocol are not the same thing.
    – Shoerob
    Commented Jan 13, 2017 at 21:20
31

This one seems to be the "official" way how Apple is handling abstract methods in UIKit. Take a look at UITableViewController and the way it's working with UITableViewDelegate. One of the very first things you do, is to add a line: delegate = self. Well, that's exactly the trick.

1. Put the abstract method in a protocol
protocol AbstractMethodsForClassX {
    func abstractMethod() -> String
}
2. Write your base class
/// It takes an implementation of the protocol as property (same like the delegate in UITableViewController does)
/// And does not implement the protocol as it does not implement the abstract methods. It has the abstract methods available in the `delegate`
class BaseClassX {
    var delegate: AbstractMethodsForClassX!

    func doSomethingWithAbstractMethod() -> String {
        return delegate.abstractMethod() + " - And I believe it"
    }
}
3. Write the Subclass(es).
/// First and only additional thing you have to do, you must set the "delegate" property
class ClassX: BaseClassX, AbstractMethodsForClassX {
    override init() {
        super.init()
        delegate = self
    }

    func abstractMethod() -> String {return "Yes, this works!"}
}
Here is, how to you use all that
let x = ClassX()
x.doSomethingWithAbstractMethod()

Check with Playground to see the output.

Some Remarks

  • First, a lot of answers were given already. I hope somebody finds all the way down to this one.
  • The question actually was, to find a pattern that implements:
    • A class calls a method, that has to be implemented in one of its derived subclasses (overridden)
    • In best case, if the method is not overridden in the subclass, get an error during compile time
  • The thing about abstract methods is, that they're a mixture of an interface definition and part of an actual implementation in the base class. Both at the same time. As swift is very new and very clean defined, it has no such convienience but "unclean" concepts (yet).
  • To me (a poor old Java guy), this problem evolves from time to time. I've read thru all the answers in this post and this time I think I found a pattern, that looks feasable - at least to me.
  • Update: It looks like the UIKit implementers at Apple use the same pattern. UITableViewController implements UITableViewDelegate but still needs to be registers as delegate by explicitely setting the delegate property.
  • This all is tested on Playground of Xcode 7.3.1
6
  • Maybe not perfect, because I have problems hiding the interface of the class from other classes, but this is enough what I needed to implement classic Factory Method in Swift. Commented Nov 20, 2017 at 20:27
  • Hmmm. I like the looks of this answer a lot more, but I'm also not sure it's suitable. I.e., I have a ViewController that can be displaying information for a handful of different types of objects, but the purpose of displaying that information is all the same, with all the same methods, but pulling and putting together the information differently based on the object. So, I have a parent delegate class for this VC, and a subclass of that delegate for each type of object. I instantiate a delegate based on the object passed in. In one example, each object has some relevant comments stored.
    – Jake T.
    Commented Jan 23, 2018 at 16:23
  • So I have a getComments method on the parent delegate. There's a handful of comment types, and I want the ones relevant to each object. So, I want the subclasses to not compile when I do delegate.getComments() if I don't override that method. The VC just knows it has a ParentDelegate object called delegate, or BaseClassX in your example, but BaseClassX does not have the abstracted method. I'd need the VC to specifically know that it is using the SubclassedDelegate.
    – Jake T.
    Commented Jan 23, 2018 at 16:25
  • I hope I understand you right. If not, do you mind to ask a new question where you can add some code? I think you just need to have an if-statement in ‚doSomethingWithAbstractMethod‘ checking, if delegate is set or not.
    – jboi
    Commented Jan 24, 2018 at 6:51
  • 1
    It' worth mentioning that assigning self to the delegate creates a retain cycle. Maybe it's better to declare it as weak (which is commonly a good idea for delegates)
    – Enricoza
    Commented Dec 4, 2019 at 10:01
29

I port a fair amount of code from a platform that supports abstract base classes to Swift and run in to this a lot. If what you truly want is the functionality of an abstract base class, then that means that this class serves both as an implementation of shared based class functionality (otherwise it would just be an interface/protocol) AND it defines methods that must be implemented by derived classes.

To do that in Swift, you will need a protocol and a base class.

protocol Thing
{
    func sharedFunction()
    func abstractFunction()
}

class BaseThing
{
    func sharedFunction()
    {
        println("All classes share this implementation")
    }
}

Note that the base class implements the shared method(s), but does not implement the protocol (since it doesn't implement all of the methods).

Then in the derived class:

class DerivedThing : BaseThing, Thing 
{
    func abstractFunction() 
    {
        println("Derived classes implement this");
    }
}

The derived class inherits sharedFunction from the base class, helping it satisfy that part of the protocol, and the protocol still requires the derived class to implement abstractFunction.

The only real downside to this method is that since the base class does not implement the protocol, if you have a base class method that needs access to a protocol property/method you will have to override that in the derived class, and from there call the base class (via super) passing self so that the base class has an instance of the protocol with which to do its work.

For example, lets say that sharedFunction needed to call abstractFunction. The protocol would stay the same, and the classes would now look like:

class BaseThing
{
    func sharedFunction(thing: Thing)
    {
        println("All classes share this implementation")
        thing.abstractFunction()
    }
}

class DerivedThing : BaseThing, Thing 
{
    func sharedFunction()
    {
        super.sharedFunction(self)
    }

    func abstractFunction() 
    {
        println("Derived classes implement this");
    }
}

Now the sharedFunction from the derived class is satisfying that part of the protocol, but the derived class is still able to share the base class logic in a reasonably straightforward way.

3
  • 4
    Great understanding and good depth on the "the base class does not implement the protocol"... which is kind of the point of an abstract class. I'm baffled that this basic OO feature is missing, but then again, I was raised on Java. Commented Dec 28, 2014 at 16:49
  • 2
    Yet the implementation does not allow to seamlessly implement the Template Function method where the template method calls a wide number of abstract methods implemented in the subclasses. In this case you should write them both as normal methods in the super class, as methods in the protocol and again as implementations in the subclass. In practice you have to write three times the same stuff and only rely on the override check to be sure of not making any disastrous misspelling! I really hope now that Swift is open to developers, full-fledged abstract function shall be introduces. Commented Dec 4, 2015 at 18:22
  • 1
    So much time, and code could be saved by introducing the "protected" keyword.
    – Shoerob
    Commented Jan 13, 2017 at 21:25
7

One way of doing this is to use an optional closure defined in the base class, and the children can choose to implement it or not.

class BaseClass {
    var abstractClosure?:(()->())?
    func someFunc()
    {
        if let abstractClosure=abstractClosure
        {
            abstractClosure()
        }
    } 
}

class SubClass : BaseClass {
    init()
    {
        super.init()
        abstractClosure={ ..... }
    }
}
1
  • What I like about this approach is that I don't have to remember to implement a protocol in the inheriting class. I have a base class for my ViewControllers, and this is how I enforce ViewController specific, optional functionality (e.g. app became active, etc.) that might get invoked by base class functionality. Commented Jul 23, 2015 at 12:46
7

Well, I know that I am late to the game and that I might be taking advantage of the changes that have happened. Sorry about that.

In any case, I would like to contribute my answer, because I love doing testing and the solutions with fatalError() is, AFAIK, not testable and the ones with exceptions are much harder to test.

I would suggest to use a more swifty approach. Your goal is to define an abstraction that has some common details, but that is not fully defined, i.e. the abstract method(s). Use a protocol that defines all the expected methods in the abstraction, both the ones that are defined, and also the ones that aren't. Then create a protocol extension that implements the methods that are defined in your case. Finally, any derived class must implement the protocol, which means all the methods, but the ones that are part of the protocol extension already have their implementation.

Extending your example with one concrete function:

protocol BaseAbstraction {
    func abstractFunction() {
        // How do I force this function to be overridden?
    }
}

extension BaseAbstraction {
    func definedFunction() {
        print("Hello")
}

class SubClass : BaseAbstraction {
    func abstractFunction() {
        // No need to "Override". Just implement.
    }
}

Notice that by doing this, the compiler is again your friend. If the method is not "overridden", you will get an error at compile time, instead of the ones that you would get with fatalError() or exceptions that would happen at run time.

2
  • 1
    Imo the best answer.
    – Apfelsaft
    Commented Jul 9, 2018 at 14:14
  • 1
    Good answer, but your base abstraction isn't capable on storing properties, however Commented Oct 25, 2019 at 16:47
5

I understand what you're doing now, I think you'd be better off using a protocol

protocol BaseProtocol {
    func abstractFunction()
}

Then, you just conform to the protocol:

class SubClass : BaseProtocol {

    func abstractFunction() {
        // Override
        println("Override")
    }
}

If you class is also a subclass, protocols follow the Superclass:

class SubClass: SuperClass, ProtocolOne, ProtocolTwo {}
3

Using assert keyword to enforce abstract methods:

class Abstract
{
    func doWork()
    {
        assert(false, "This method must be overriden by the subclass")
    }
}

class Concrete : Abstract
{
    override func doWork()
    {
        println("Did some work!")
    }
}

let abstract = Abstract()
let concrete = Concrete()

abstract.doWork()    // fails
concrete.doWork()    // OK

However, as Steve Waddicor mentioned you probably want a protocol instead.

2
  • The benefit of abstract methods is that the checks are done at compile time. Commented Dec 4, 2015 at 18:23
  • don't use assert, because on archiving, u will get 'Missing return in a function expected to return' error. Use fatalError("This method must be overriden by the subclass") Commented Oct 29, 2017 at 15:17
2

I understand the question and was looking for the same solution. Protocols are not the same as Abstract methods.

In a protocol you need to specify that your class conforms to such protocol, an abstract method means that you have to override such method.

In other words, protocols are kind of optionals, you need to specify the base class and the protocol, if you do not specify the protocol, then you do not have to override such methods.

An abstract method means that you want a base class but need to implement your own method or two, which is not the same.

I need the same behaviour, that is why I was looking for a solution. I guess Swift is missing such feature.

1

There's another alternative to this issue, although there still is a downside when compared to @jaumard's proposal; it requires a return statement. Although I miss the point of requiring it, because it consists in directly throwing an exception:

class AbstractMethodException : NSException {

    init() {
        super.init(
            name: "Called an abstract method",
            reason: "All abstract methods must be overriden by subclasses",
            userInfo: nil
        );
    }
}

And then:

class BaseClass {
    func abstractFunction() {
        AbstractMethodException.raise();
    }
}

Whatever comes after that is unreachable, so I don't see why force the return.

2
  • Do you mean AbstractMethodException().raise() ?
    – Joshcodes
    Commented Feb 23, 2015 at 21:58
  • Err... Probably. I can't test right now, but if it works that way, than yes Commented Mar 4, 2015 at 14:35
1

I don't know is it going to be useful, but I had a similar issue with abstracted method while trying to build SpritKit game. What I wanted is an abstract Animal class that has methods such as move(), run() etc, but sprite names (and other functionality) should be provided by class children. So I ended up doing something like this (tested for Swift 2):

import SpriteKit

// --- Functions that must be implemented by child of Animal
public protocol InheritedAnimal
{
    func walkSpriteNames() -> [String]
    func runSpriteNames() -> [String]
}


// --- Abstract animal
public class Animal: SKNode
{
    private let inheritedAnimal: InheritedAnimal

    public init(inheritedAnimal: InheritedAnimal)
    {
        self.inheritedAnimal = inheritedAnimal
        super.init()
    }

    public required init?(coder aDecoder: NSCoder)
    {
        fatalError("NSCoding not supported")
    }

    public func walk()
    {
        let sprites = inheritedAnimal.walkSpriteNames()
        // create animation with walking sprites...
    }

    public func run()
    {
        let sprites = inheritedAnimal.runSpriteNames()
        // create animation with running sprites
    }
}


// --- Sheep
public class SheepAnimal: Animal
{
    public required init?(coder aDecoder: NSCoder)
    {
        fatalError("NSCoding not supported")
    }

    public required init()
    {
        super.init(inheritedAnimal: InheritedAnimalImpl())
    }

    private class InheritedAnimalImpl: InheritedAnimal
    {
        init() {}

        func walkSpriteNames() -> [String]
        {
            return ["sheep_step_01", "sheep_step_02", "sheep_step_03", "sheep_step_04"]
        }

        func runSpriteNames() -> [String]
        {
            return ["sheep_run_01", "sheep_run_02"]
        }
    }
}

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