4

I'm looking for advice on handle a growing number of commands in a wpf mvvm project.

My viewmodels are collecting a good number of them, and I feel like before the project is matured I need to do something better to handle them. Right now all my commands are just listed as properties in my viewmodels, and either loaded in the constructor of the VM, or lazy loaded.

And if it matters I'm using MVVM Light's RelayCommand implementation of ICommand.

I've seen on a larger open source project putting them in collections, and grouping those collections into more collections...that all seemed really messy to me, but the context was a little different, as all those commands were binding to menus. I don't have a typical drop down menu in this application, but I do use many different context menus/buttons.

Anyways, what are some ideas on handling commands, from both a code readability/maintainability as well as functional perspective?

  • 3
    When I have lots of commands, I have placed them in a partial class of the VM called XXXXCommanding, where XXXX is the name of the VM. I don't go along with placing them in collections however. If I need to iterate all the commands, I'll use reflection. – Gayot Fow Jun 8 '14 at 21:40
  • 4
    Have you considered that your ViewModels might be doing to much work? – CodeMonkey Jun 8 '14 at 22:28
  • 1
    I'm with @CodeMonkey on this one. Misusing partial classes to split your giant class across multiple individual files is just hiding the problem. – Daniel Mann Jun 8 '14 at 22:30
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    Also, if you find yourself doing a lot of "Toolbar"-like UIs and their respective Commands (think for example a CRUD screen with New, Edit, Save, Cancel, Delete, etc). Consider using an ObservableCollection<ICommand> and implementing the UI as an ItemsControl with an ItemTemplate containing buttons. That's what I usually do when there's "groups" of commands. – Federico Berasategui Jun 9 '14 at 3:30
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    Can you give us example of such ViewModel and its many commands (i.e. what sort of commands)? I'm asking because the only times I've seen more than 3-4 commands per view model is when it was an anti-pattern, namely something resembling god object. Maybe your design can be improved. – k.m Jun 9 '14 at 12:55
1

This post show you how to create dynamic properties for exposing your custom commands. You can mix this with reflection in order to handle a lot of commands.

Create a custom attribute:

[AttributeUsage(AttributeTargets.Class)]
public class CommandClassAttribute : Attribute
{
    readonly string commandName;

    public CommandClassAttribute(string commandName)
    {
        this.commandName = commandName;
    }

    public string CommandName
    {
        get { return commandName; }
    }
}

Then mark all your command with it:

[CommandClass("New")]
public class NewCommand : ICommand
{
    public bool CanExecute(object parameter)
    {
        return true;
    }

    public void Execute(object parameter)
    {
        MessageBox.Show("New");
    }

    public event EventHandler CanExecuteChanged;
}

You can then load all commands at application startup:

readonly Dictionary<string, ICommand> commands = new Dictionary<string, ICommand>();

void LoadCommands()
{
    Type[] types = Assembly.GetExecutingAssembly().GetExportedTypes();
    var iCommandInterface = typeof(ICommand);
    foreach (Type type in types)
    {
        object[] attributes = type.GetCustomAttributes(typeof(CommandClassAttribute), false);
        if (attributes.Length == 0) continue;
        if (iCommandInterface.IsAssignableFrom(type))
        {
            string commandName = ((CommandClassAttribute)attributes[0]).CommandName;
            commands.Add(commandName, (ICommand)Activator.CreateInstance(type));
        }
    }
}

This architecture can be easily extended to support defining commands in plugins.

1

Meh... if it bothers you to look at them, then put them in a #region and collapse the region. The guy who suggested putting them in a dictionary, so you only have one property that seems like a maintenance headache to me... and the XAML binding gets messy.

0

Right now all my commands are just listed as properties in my viewmodels, and either loaded in the constructor of the VM, or lazy loaded.

Instead of making a distinct property for each command in the ViewModel, try making a single collection property Commands to hold all commands in the ViewModel.

This way you simply create and add all the commands to the Commands collection in the ViewModel constructor or even from a factory method outside the ViewModel constructor.

Anyways, what are some ideas on handling commands, from both a code readability/maintainability as well as functional perspective?

  1. 95% of cases there is no need to differentiate between commands in the ViewModel.

  2. It's easier to maintain one collection property that to maintain lots of properties in the ViewModel.

  3. Commands collection can be easily made composite and mapped to a toolbar or a hierarchical context menu.

  4. The ability to add commands to ViewModel without changing the existing class or subclassing is really great.

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