2

I have a following code

class OuterClass<T>{

class Innerclass{
int k;
}

public static void main(String argv[]){

OuterClass<Integer> out =new OuterClass<>();
Innerclass in; // errors out
}

}

But for a class with no generics like the following code, I could create object for inner class.

class OuterClass{

class Innerclass{
int k;
}

public static void main(String argv[]){

OuterClass out =new OuterClass();
Innerclass in; // No error

}

}

why am i not able to create object of inner class though no generics are used in the inner class in my first example? Please explain.

  • 1
    Note that neither version of the code actually creates an instance of the inner class. You only declare a variable of the inner class's type. – user2357112 supports Monica Jun 9 '14 at 7:01
2

Your main method belongs to OuterClass and is static in there. Since InnerClass is not a static class but implicitly depends on the generic type T (the generic type is available in the inner class, even if your example isn't using it), you cannot reference it from a static method.

In other words, since InnerClass depends on the generic type, you cannot break it "lose" from OuterClass and use it outside of it.

If your inner class won't depend on the generic type, you can just make it static. However, you might want to consider just extracting it into a separate class rather than nesting classes in this case:

class OuterClass<T> {
    static class InnerClass {
        int k;
    }

    public static void main( String argv[] ) {
        InnerClass inner = new InnerClass();
    }
}

If the generic is important for the inner class, you can tell the compiler which generic to infer for the outer class by specifying it (note that the generic type of outer and inner must match) or by using OuterClass.InnerClass in which case the compiler will use the raw type:

class OuterClass<T> {
    class InnerClass {
        int k;
    }

    public static void main( String argv[] ) {
        OuterClass<String> outer = new OuterClass<String>();

        // works and has the "correct" generic type
        OuterClass<String>.InnerClass inner1 = outer.new InnerClass();

        // works, but uses the raw type
        OuterClass.InnerClass inner2 = outer.new InnerClass();
    }
}

Note that you need an enclosing instance outer of type OuterClass<T> in order to instantiate InnerClass (since the class is not static, it belongs to an instance of OuterClass).

This also goes for the example without generics: you will need an enclosing instance to instantiate the inner class, so

class OuterClass {
    class InnerClass {
        int k;
    }

    public static void main( String argv[] ) {
        OuterClass outer = new OuterClass();
        InnerClass in = outer.new InnerClass();
    }
}

will work while

class OuterClass {
    class InnerClass {
        int k;
    }

    public static void main( String argv[] ) {
        OuterClass outer = new OuterClass();
        InnerClass in = new InnerClass();
    }
}

won't.

  • This doesn't explain why the version without generics compiles. – user2357112 supports Monica Jun 9 '14 at 6:58
  • 1
    @user2357112 It only compiles because he is not instanciating the class. A mere InnerClass in = new InnerClass() will fail even in the version without generics as no enclosing instance is given. I edited my answer. – Ingo Bürk Jun 9 '14 at 7:05
  • 1
    The new version of the answer explains more. I'd like to add that OuterClass.InnerClass inner; compiles whether or not OuterClass is generic, since it uses the raw type. InnerClass inner; attempts to use the parameterized type and has no type parameter to supply. – user2357112 supports Monica Jun 9 '14 at 7:16

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