7

Often I am using a switch-case, and creating a case for all enum items.

Is there a shortcut (it may well be a resharper shortcut) which creates all cases automatically and just let me fill the cases?

Or is this question related to code-snippet subject? Is it possible to create a dynamic code-snippet (it will vary according to enum type) ?

2
  • 1
    There's a danger there that a: it doesn't adapt to code changes (new enum values, etc), and b: it doesn't handle to undefined values ([Flags], or just arbitrary values). Frankly, IMO - whatever IDE tooling you use, great, but adding a default case that throws a suitable exception should be fairly standard practice. And tests. It is notable that F# has better treatment here (at least, for discriminated unions) Jun 9, 2014 at 8:00
  • @MarcGravell You are right. In resharper option in default case it is throwing ArgumentOutOfRangeException.
    – serdar
    Jun 9, 2014 at 8:24

2 Answers 2

20

Plain VS snippet will work for you ..write switch and press "TAB", write your enum type and press enter(twice), the cases will be generated for you.

0
12

Set the cursor after the first brace within the switch statement and press Alt + Enter. You will see the option to generate switch labels.

7
  • 5
    Is that resharper? I don't think that is VS vanilla. Jun 9, 2014 at 7:58
  • 2
    Yes it is a resharper shortcut. Jun 9, 2014 at 7:59
  • Great, thank you. Yes it seems it is resharper short-cut. alt-enter gives resharper options.
    – serdar
    Jun 9, 2014 at 8:00
  • Using my ReSharper 2016.2 it 'generate switch labels' isn't show if I press Alt+Enter
    – MichiBack
    Sep 29, 2016 at 10:16
  • 1
    Using ReSharper 2016.2.2, generate switch labels does not work. A workaround for this is to enter Switch TAB+TAB (with a capital S), with tab+tab, it replaces Switch with switch, and then it auto-fills.
    – Dennis
    Oct 31, 2016 at 10:38

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.