132

I'd like to map a function on all keys in the dictionary. I was hoping something like the following would work, but filter cannot be applied to dictionary directly. What's the cleanest way of achieving this?

In this example, I'm trying to increment each value by 1. However this is incidental for the example - the main purpose is to figure out how to apply map() to a dictionary.

var d = ["foo" : 1, "bar" : 2]

d.map() {
    $0.1 += 1
}
  • 1
    Dictionary doesn't have a map function, so it's not clear what you're trying to do. – David Berry Jun 9 '14 at 8:39
  • 6
    Yes - I know that Dictionary doesn't have map function. The question could be rephrased as how can this be accomplished with closures without needing to iterate over the whole dictionary. – Maria Zverina Jun 9 '14 at 8:55
  • 2
    you still need to iterate over the whole dictionary since that's what a map does. what you're asking for is a way of hiding the iteration behind an extension / closure so you don't have to look at it every time you use it. – Joseph Mark Jun 9 '14 at 22:05
  • 1
    For Swift 4, see my answer that shows up to 5 different ways to solve your problem. – Imanou Petit Jun 17 '17 at 21:08

14 Answers 14

250

Swift 4+

Good news! Swift 4 includes a mapValues(_:) method which constructs a copy of a dictionary with the same keys, but different values. It also includes a filter(_:) overload which returns a Dictionary, and init(uniqueKeysWithValues:) and init(_:uniquingKeysWith:) initializers to create a Dictionary from an arbitrary sequence of tuples. That means that, if you want to change both the keys and values, you can say something like:

let newDict = Dictionary(uniqueKeysWithValues:
    oldDict.map { key, value in (key.uppercased(), value.lowercased()) })

There are also new APIs for merging dictionaries together, substituting a default value for missing elements, grouping values (converting a collection into a dictionary of arrays, keyed by the result of mapping the collection over some function), and more.

During discussion of the proposal, SE-0165, that introduced these features, I brought up this Stack Overflow answer several times, and I think the sheer number of upvotes helped demonstrate the demand. So thanks for your help making Swift better!

  • 5
    It is certainly imperfect, but we mustn't let the perfect be the enemy of the good. A map that could produce conflicting keys is still a useful map in many situations. (On the other hand, you could argue that mapping only the values is a natural interpretation of map on dictionaries—both the original poster's example and mine only modify the values, and conceptually, map on an array only modifies the values, not the indices.) – Brent Royal-Gordon Jan 17 '15 at 1:42
  • 2
    your last code block seems to be missing a try: return Dictionary<Key, OutValue>(try map { (k, v) in (k, try transform(v)) }) – jpsim Nov 4 '15 at 0:19
  • 9
    Updated for Swift 2.1? Getting DictionaryExtension.swift:13:16: Argument labels '(_:)' do not match any available overloads – Per Eriksson Nov 8 '15 at 14:20
  • 4
    With Swift 2.2 I am getting Argument labels '(_:)' do not match any available overloads when implementing that last extension. Not really sure how to solve it :/ – Audioy May 20 '16 at 8:22
  • 2
    @Audioy That code snippet depends on the Dictionary initializer added in one of the previous examples. Make sure you include both of them. – Brent Royal-Gordon May 21 '16 at 23:49
36

With Swift 5, you can use one of the five following snippets in order to solve your problem.


#1. Using Dictionary mapValues(_:) method

let dictionary = ["foo": 1, "bar": 2, "baz": 5]

let newDictionary = dictionary.mapValues { value in
    return value + 1
}
//let newDictionary = dictionary.mapValues { $0 + 1 } // also works

print(newDictionary) // prints: ["baz": 6, "foo": 2, "bar": 3]

#2. Using Dictionary map method and init(uniqueKeysWithValues:) initializer

let dictionary = ["foo": 1, "bar": 2, "baz": 5]

let tupleArray = dictionary.map { (key: String, value: Int) in
    return (key, value + 1)
}
//let tupleArray = dictionary.map { ($0, $1 + 1) } // also works

let newDictionary = Dictionary(uniqueKeysWithValues: tupleArray)

print(newDictionary) // prints: ["baz": 6, "foo": 2, "bar": 3]

#3. Using Dictionary reduce(_:_:) method or reduce(into:_:) method

let dictionary = ["foo": 1, "bar": 2, "baz": 5]

let newDictionary = dictionary.reduce([:]) { (partialResult: [String: Int], tuple: (key: String, value: Int)) in
    var result = partialResult
    result[tuple.key] = tuple.value + 1
    return result
}

print(newDictionary) // prints: ["baz": 6, "foo": 2, "bar": 3]
let dictionary = ["foo": 1, "bar": 2, "baz": 5]

let newDictionary = dictionary.reduce(into: [:]) { (result: inout [String: Int], tuple: (key: String, value: Int)) in
    result[tuple.key] = tuple.value + 1
}

print(newDictionary) // prints: ["baz": 6, "foo": 2, "bar": 3]

#4. Using Dictionary subscript(_:default:) subscript

let dictionary = ["foo": 1, "bar": 2, "baz": 5]

var newDictionary = [String: Int]()
for (key, value) in dictionary {
    newDictionary[key, default: value] += 1
}

print(newDictionary) // prints: ["baz": 6, "foo": 2, "bar": 3]

#5. Using Dictionary subscript(_:) subscript

let dictionary = ["foo": 1, "bar": 2, "baz": 5]

var newDictionary = [String: Int]()
for (key, value) in dictionary {
    newDictionary[key] = value + 1
}

print(newDictionary) // prints: ["baz": 6, "foo": 2, "bar": 3]
18

While most of the answers here focus on how to map the entire dictionary (keys and values), the question really only wanted to map the values. This is an important distinction since mapping values allows you to guarantee the same number of entries, whereas mapping both key and value might result in duplicate keys.

Here’s an extension, mapValues, that allows you to map just the values. Note it also extends dictionary with an init from a sequence of key/value pairs, which is a bit more general than initializing it from an array:

extension Dictionary {
    init<S: SequenceType where S.Generator.Element == Element>
      (_ seq: S) {
        self.init()
        for (k,v) in seq {
            self[k] = v
        }
    }

    func mapValues<T>(transform: Value->T) -> Dictionary<Key,T> {
        return Dictionary<Key,T>(zip(self.keys, self.values.map(transform)))
    }

}
  • ..how is it used? Im new to swift Mind putting an example here? – iOS Calendar patchthecode.com Apr 21 '16 at 0:38
  • when i tried myDictionary.map, inside the closure, i had to do another map the regular way. This works, but is this the way its supposed to be used? – iOS Calendar patchthecode.com Apr 21 '16 at 0:40
  • Is there a guarantee somewhere that the order of keys & values when called separately are paired, and thus suitable for zip? – Aaron Zinman Jan 31 '17 at 8:36
  • Why create a new init when you could just use func mapValues<T>(_ transform: (_ value: Value) -> T) -> [Key: T] { var result = [Key: T]() for (key, val) in self { result[key] = transform(val) } return result }. I find it reads better too. Is there a performance issue? – Marcel Jul 19 '17 at 13:09
11

The cleanest way is to just add map to Dictionary:

extension Dictionary {
    mutating func map(transform: (key:KeyType, value:ValueType) -> (newValue:ValueType)) {
        for key in self.keys {
            var newValue = transform(key: key, value: self[key]!)
            self.updateValue(newValue, forKey: key)
        }
    }
}

Checking that it works:

var dic = ["a": 50, "b": 60, "c": 70]

dic.map { $0.1 + 1 }

println(dic)

dic.map { (key, value) in
    if key == "a" {
        return value
    } else {
        return value * 2
    }
}

println(dic)

Output:

[c: 71, a: 51, b: 61]
[c: 142, a: 51, b: 122]
  • 1
    The problem I see with this approach is that SequenceType.map is not a mutating function. Your example could be rewritten to follow the existing contract for map, but that is the same as the accepted answer. – Christopher Pickslay Nov 25 '15 at 19:25
7

You can also use reduce instead of map. reduce is capable of doing anything map can do and more!

let oldDict = ["old1": 1, "old2":2]

let newDict = reduce(oldDict, [String:Int]()) { dict, pair in
    var d = dict
    d["new\(pair.1)"] = pair.1
    return d
}

println(newDict)   //  ["new1": 1, "new2": 2]

It would be fairly easy to wrap this in an extension, but even without the extension it lets you do what you want with one function call.

  • 10
    The downside of this approach is that a brand new copy of the dictionary is made every time you add a new key, so this function is horribly inefficient (the optimizer might save you). – Airspeed Velocity Apr 5 '15 at 19:12
  • That is a good point...one thing I don't understand very well yet is the internals of Swift's memory management. I appreciate comments like this that make me think about it :) – Aaron Rasmussen Apr 6 '15 at 17:09
  • 1
    No need for temp var and reduce is now a method in Swift 2.0: let newDict = oldDict.reduce([String:Int]()) { (var dict, pair) in dict["new\(pair.1)"] = pair.1; return dict } – Zmey Jul 23 '15 at 15:48
4

It turns out you can do this. What you have to do is create an array from the MapCollectionView<Dictionary<KeyType, ValueType>, KeyType> returned from the dictionaries keys method. (Info here) You can then map this array, and pass the updated values back to the dictionary.

var dictionary = ["foo" : 1, "bar" : 2]

Array(dictionary.keys).map() {
    dictionary.updateValue(dictionary[$0]! + 1, forKey: $0)
}

dictionary
  • Can you please add explanation how to convert ["foo" : 1, "bar" : 2] to [("foo", 1), ("bar", 2)] – Maria Zverina Jun 9 '14 at 9:47
  • @MariaZverina I'm not sure what you mean. – Mick MacCallum Jun 9 '14 at 9:54
  • If you can perform the conversion above, the filter can be applied directly to the resulting array – Maria Zverina Jun 9 '14 at 10:00
  • @MariaZverina Gotcha. Yeah unfortunately I'm not aware of any way to do that. – Mick MacCallum Jun 10 '14 at 2:04
3

According to the Swift Standard Library Reference, map is a function of arrays. Not for dictionaries.

But you could iterate your dictionary to modify the keys:

var d = ["foo" : 1, "bar" : 2]

for (name, key) in d {
    d[name] = d[name]! + 1
}
3

I was looking for a way to map a dictionary right into a typed Array with custom objects. Found the solution in this extension:

extension Dictionary {
    func mapKeys<U> (transform: Key -> U) -> Array<U> {
        var results: Array<U> = []
        for k in self.keys {
            results.append(transform(k))
        }
        return results
    }

    func mapValues<U> (transform: Value -> U) -> Array<U> {
        var results: Array<U> = []
        for v in self.values {
            results.append(transform(v))
        }
        return results
    }

    func map<U> (transform: Value -> U) -> Array<U> {
        return self.mapValues(transform)
    }

    func map<U> (transform: (Key, Value) -> U) -> Array<U> {
        var results: Array<U> = []
        for k in self.keys {
            results.append(transform(k as Key, self[ k ]! as Value))
        }
        return results
    }

    func map<K: Hashable, V> (transform: (Key, Value) -> (K, V)) -> Dictionary<K, V> {
        var results: Dictionary<K, V> = [:]
        for k in self.keys {
            if let value = self[ k ] {
                let (u, w) = transform(k, value)
                results.updateValue(w, forKey: u)
            }
        }
        return results
    }
}

Using it as followed:

self.values = values.map({ (key:String, value:NSNumber) -> VDLFilterValue in
    return VDLFilterValue(name: key, amount: value)
})
3

Swift 3

I try an easy way in Swift 3.

I want to map [String: String?] to [String : String], I use forEach instead of map or flat map.

    let oldDict = ["key0": "val0", "key1": nil, "key1": "val2","key2": nil]
    var newDict = [String: String]()
    oldDict.forEach { (source: (key: String, value: String?)) in
        if let value = source.value{
            newDict[source.key] = value
        }
    }
  • Undesirable as it creates a new array and appends to it – Steve Kuo Feb 12 '18 at 4:41
1

I assume the problem is to keep the keys of our original dictionary and map all its values in some way.

Let us generalize and say that we may want to map all the values to another type.

So what we'd like to start with is a dictionary and a closure (a function) and end up with a new dictionary. The problem is, of course, that Swift's strict typing gets in the way. A closure needs to specify what type goes in and what type comes out, and thus we cannot make a method that takes a general closure — except in the context of a generic. Thus we need a generic function.

Other solutions have concentrated on doing this within the generic world of the Dictionary generic struct itself, but I find it easier to think in terms of a top-level function. For example, we could write this, where K is the key type, V1 is the value type of the starting dictionary, and V2 is the value type of the ending dictionary:

func mapValues<K,V1,V2>(d1:[K:V1], closure:(V1)->V2) -> [K:V2] {
    var d2 = [K:V2]()
    for (key,value) in zip(d1.keys, d1.values.map(closure)) {
        d2.updateValue(value, forKey: key)
    }
    return d2
}

Here's a simple example of calling it, just to prove that the generic does indeed resolve itself at compile time:

let d : [String:Int] = ["one":1, "two":2]
let result = mapValues(d) { (i : Int) -> String in String(i) }

We started with a dictionary of [String:Int] and ended up with a dictionary of [String:String] by transforming the values of the first dictionary through a closure.

(EDIT: I see now that this is effectively the same as AirspeedVelocity's solution, except that I didn't add the extra elegance of a Dictionary initializer that makes a Dictionary out of a zip sequence.)

1

Swift 3

Usage:

let bob = ["a": "AAA", "b": "BBB", "c": "CCC"]
bob.mapDictionary { ($1, $0) } // ["BBB": "b", "CCC": "c", "AAA": "a"]

Extension:

extension Dictionary {
    func mapDictionary(transform: (Key, Value) -> (Key, Value)?) -> Dictionary<Key, Value> {
        var dict = [Key: Value]()
        for key in keys {
            guard let value = self[key], let keyValue = transform(key, value) else {
                continue
            }

            dict[keyValue.0] = keyValue.1
        }
        return dict
    }
}
1

I you're only trying to map the values (potentially changing their type), include this extension:

extension Dictionary {
    func valuesMapped<T>(_ transform: (Value) -> T) -> [Key: T] {
        var newDict = [Key: T]()
        for (key, value) in self {
            newDict[key] = transform(value)
        }
        return newDict
    }
}

Given you have this dictionary:

let intsDict = ["One": 1, "Two": 2, "Three": 3]

Single-line value transformation then looks like this:

let stringsDict = intsDict.valuesMapped { String($0 * 2) }
// => ["One": "2", "Three": "6", "Two": "4"]

Multi-line value transformation then looks like this:

let complexStringsDict = intsDict.valuesMapped { (value: Int) -> String in
    let calculationResult = (value * 3 + 7) % 5
    return String("Complex number #\(calculationResult)")
}
// => ["One": "Complex number #0", "Three": ...
0

Another approach is to map to a dictionary and reduce, where functions keyTransform and valueTransform are functions.

let dictionary = ["a": 1, "b": 2, "c": 3]

func keyTransform(key: String) -> Int {
    return Int(key.unicodeScalars.first!.value)
}

func valueTransform(value: Int) -> String {
    return String(value)
}

dictionary.map { (key, value) in
     [keyTransform(key): valueTransform(value)]
}.reduce([Int:String]()) { memo, element in
    var m = memo
    for (k, v) in element {
        m.updateValue(v, forKey: k)
    }
    return m
}
  • It was more a concept then actual code, but nonetheless, I expanded it into running code. – NebulaFox Dec 1 '15 at 15:06
0

Swift 3 I used this,

func mapDict(dict:[String:Any])->[String:String]{
    var updatedDict:[String:String] = [:]
    for key in dict.keys{
        if let value = dict[key]{
            updatedDict[key] = String(describing: value)
        }
    }

   return updatedDict
}

Usage:

let dict:[String:Any] = ["MyKey":1]
let mappedDict:[String:String] = mapDict(dict: dict)

Ref

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