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I'm trying to make a function that returns the name of the computer. This is what I have so far:

char* getName()
{
    char buffer[MAX_COMPUTERNAME_LENGTH + 1];
    DWORD length = sizeof(buffer);

    GetComputerNameEx((COMPUTER_NAME_FORMAT)0, buffer, &length);

    return buffer;
}

But it doesn't really work. It seems it returns a string with very strange character encoding. I would appreciate all help.

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5

Use an std::string to avoid memory issues. And as std::string uses single byte characters, you should use the single-byte version of GetComputerNameEx, GetComputerNameExA.

Also it is a good idea to check the error value, as the documentation explicitly states that the computer name might be longer than MAX_COMPUTERNAME_LENGTH.

std::string getName()
{
    char buffer[MAX_COMPUTERNAME_LENGTH + 1];
    DWORD length = sizeof(buffer);

    bool ok = GetComputerNameExA((COMPUTER_NAME_FORMAT)0, buffer, &length);

    if (ok) { 
        return buffer;
    } else {
        //handle error
    }
}

Or you can use the wide version:

std::wstring getName()
{
    wchar_t buffer[MAX_COMPUTERNAME_LENGTH + 1];
    DWORD length = sizeof(buffer) / sizeof(wchar_t);

    bool ok = GetComputerNameExW((COMPUTER_NAME_FORMAT)0, buffer, &length);

    if (ok) { 
        return buffer;
    } else {
        //handle error
    }
}

or make a code that works under both environments (idea from here):

std::basic_string<TCHAR> getName()
{
    TCHAR buffer[MAX_COMPUTERNAME_LENGTH + 1];
    DWORD length = sizeof(buffer) / sizeof(TCHAR);

    bool ok = GetComputerNameEx((COMPUTER_NAME_FORMAT)0, buffer, &length);

    if (ok) { 
        return buffer;
    } else {
        //handle error
    }
}
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  • +1 for mentioning use of TCHAR. Aside from other errors, the question mentions strange encoding of the returned string, which is most likely to do with building in Unicode. – icabod Jun 9 '14 at 11:15
  • Please don't advise the use of TCHAR today. That was useful when you needed code to compile under both Win95 and WinNT. No longer is this useful. – David Heffernan Jun 9 '14 at 11:16
  • @DavidHeffernan: That's true, especially with the gradual deprecation of MCBS builds in Visual Studio, but using TCHAR at least would match the rest of the build. If using VS. – icabod Jun 9 '14 at 11:19
  • @icabod The right way to do it is to compile for UNICODE and use wchar_t, std::wstring, L"..." etc. Using TCHAR just adds a useless and confusing level of indirection. – David Heffernan Jun 9 '14 at 11:22
  • In either case, you should pass the final length to the string constructor and not rely on the buffer being null-terminated, eg: return std::string(buffer, length); or return std::wstring(buffer, length); or return std::basic_string<TCHAR>(buffer, length); – Remy Lebeau Jun 9 '14 at 20:27

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