97

How can I get Unix time in Go in milliseconds?

I have the following function:

func makeTimestamp() int64 {
    return time.Now().UnixNano() % 1e6 / 1e3
}

I need less precision and only want milliseconds.

151

Just divide it:

func makeTimestamp() int64 {
    return time.Now().UnixNano() / int64(time.Millisecond)
}

Here is an example that you can compile and run to see the output

package main

import (
    "time"
    "fmt"
)

func main() {
    a := makeTimestamp()

    fmt.Printf("%d \n", a)
}

func makeTimestamp() int64 {
    return time.Now().UnixNano() / int64(time.Millisecond)
}
15
  • 47
    The above calculation doesn't really make sense. You don't divide nanoseconds by miliseconds. It happens to be the case that golang choses to represent times down to nanosecond and the constant 'Millisecond' is 1,000,000. Mathematically speaking, calculation should be: time.Now().UnixNano() * (time.Nanosecond / time.Millisecond). However it's best to change the order because of integer division: time.Nanosecond * time.Now().UnixNano() / time.Millisecond – Jonno Nov 4 '14 at 1:00
  • 2
    Thanks for that. Note I didn't say you get the wrong result. It's that the calculation doesn't make sense and you're using information about go's constants. If tomorrow go has a new version that chooses higher precision for time units, for example, time.Nanosecond == 10 and time.Millisecond == 10,000,000, your code breaks – Jonno Nov 4 '14 at 1:07
  • 5
    thanks for that. You're welcome to rely on that guarantee, but this is in effect a Y2K bug. It may break at some point in the future. Why choose the wrong mathematical representation? – Jonno Nov 4 '14 at 1:12
  • 13
    -1 This is just wrong. Your units don't add up. Look up dimensional analysis from physics. Your result does not represent time. – Kugel Jan 20 '15 at 12:48
  • 9
    Quick answer for busy peoples. Look at https://gobyexample.com/epoch – honzajde Aug 15 '15 at 13:17
67

As @Jono points out in @OneOfOne's answer, the correct answer should take into account the duration of a nanosecond. Eg:

func makeTimestamp() int64 {
    return time.Now().UnixNano() / (int64(time.Millisecond)/int64(time.Nanosecond))
}

OneOfOne's answer works because time.Nanosecond happens to be 1, and dividing by 1 has no effect. I don't know enough about go to know how likely this is to change in the future, but for the strictly correct answer I would use this function, not OneOfOne's answer. I doubt there is any performance disadvantage as the compiler should be able to optimize this perfectly well.

See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dimensional_analysis

Another way of looking at this is that both time.Now().UnixNano() and time.Millisecond use the same units (Nanoseconds). As long as that is true, OneOfOne's answer should work perfectly well.

7
  • 4
    The value of .UnixNano() will always be the time in Nanoseconds, time.Millisecond will always be the value for well, you guessed it, a millisecond, so even if for whatever idiotic reason the constant changes value, dividing UnixNano by Millisecond will always return the value in millisecond. – OneOfOne Feb 2 '16 at 5:36
  • 9
    The units of Unix.Nano is not in question; nor is the value of time.Millisecond. What is in question is the unit of time.Millisecond. It happens to be defined in nanoseconds, which is why your answer works. If time.Milliseconds were measured in other units (say, microseconds), the answer you gave would not work. – Bjorn Roche Feb 2 '16 at 15:54
  • 2
    @BjornRoche I'm a little late to this party, but wouldn't the correct answer be (int64(time.Now().UnixNano() / int64(time.Nanosecond))/int64(time.Millisecond)? The dimensional analysis ns/(ms/ns) returns ns^2/ms. Your answer also works because time.Nanosecond=1, but the units are off... – The Puma Jan 7 '18 at 16:35
  • 1
    @thepuma It's been a while so I might be looking at this wrong or misunderstanding you, but ns/(ms/ns) is equivalent to ns^2/ms, so both answers should work. – Bjorn Roche Jan 26 '18 at 21:55
  • This answer is correct because running this will display the same result as when converting using the online converter unitconverters.net/prefixes/nano-to-milli.htm – user666 Aug 16 '18 at 6:43
64

Keep it simple.

func NowAsUnixMilli() int64 {
    return time.Now().UnixNano() / 1e6
}
0
3

How can I get Unix time in Go in milliseconds?

No more divisions from nanoseconds. Starting from Go 1.17 (to be released in August 2021) you can just use Time.UnixMilli method directly:

// a deterministic date value
t := time.Date(2021, 7, 16, 0, 0, 0, 0, time.UTC)

m := t.UnixMilli()
fmt.Println(m) // 1626452451627
2

I think it's better to round the time to milliseconds before the division.

func makeTimestamp() int64 {
    return time.Now().Round(time.Millisecond).UnixNano() / (int64(time.Millisecond)/int64(time.Nanosecond))
}

Here is an example program:

package main

import (
        "fmt"
        "time"
)

func main() {
        fmt.Println(unixMilli(time.Unix(0, 123400000)))
        fmt.Println(unixMilli(time.Unix(0, 123500000)))
        m := makeTimestampMilli()
        fmt.Println(m)
        fmt.Println(time.Unix(m/1e3, (m%1e3)*int64(time.Millisecond)/int64(time.Nanosecond)))
}

func unixMilli(t time.Time) int64 {
        return t.Round(time.Millisecond).UnixNano() / (int64(time.Millisecond) / int64(time.Nanosecond))
}

func makeTimestampMilli() int64 {
        return unixMilli(time.Now())
}

The above program printed the result below on my machine:

123
124
1472313624305
2016-08-28 01:00:24.305 +0900 JST
1
  • 1
    You forgot to mention why you think it's better to round the time to milliseconds. – Gurpartap Singh May 13 '19 at 14:13
1

Simple-read but precise solution would be:

func nowAsUnixMilliseconds(){
    return time.Now().Round(time.Millisecond).UnixNano() / 1e6
}

This function:

  1. Correctly rounds the value to the nearest millisecond (compare with integer division: it just discards decimal part of the resulting value);
  2. Does not dive into Go-specifics of time.Duration coercion — since it uses a numerical constant that represents absolute millisecond/nanosecond divider.

P.S. I've run benchmarks with constant and composite dividers, they showed almost no difference, so feel free to use more readable or more language-strict solution.

2
  • 1
    If you want to know the correct Unix time in milliseconds (milliseconds since the Epoch), you should not use Round(), as that will round up half the time, and your result will then contain a millisecond which has not fully elapsed yet. – torbenl Apr 7 '20 at 5:07
  • Thanks for a note, @torbenl - this may be important for most of systems (mine is an exclusion, this time is stored for history only). – Liubov Apr 20 '20 at 19:28
1

At https://github.com/golang/go/issues/44196 randall77 suggested

time.Now().Sub(time.Unix(0,0)).Milliseconds()

which exploits the fact that Go's time.Duration already have Milliseconds method.

0

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