7

What do the double arrows indicate in the return type of the last function here?

Are they used to indicate two different return values?

If so, how do you know which order the arrows are in, if the functions in chooseStepFunction() were different types? E.g., if stepForward() returned a String

func stepForward(input: Int) -> Int{
    return input + 1
}

func stepBackward(input: Int) -> Int{
    return input - 1
}

func chooseStepFunction(backwards: Bool) -> (Int) -> Int{
    return backwards ? stepBackward: stepForward
}
11

Given:

(x) -> (y) -> z

You would read this as:

A function which accepts x and returns a function which accepts y and returns z.

So in this case, chooseStepFunction is a function that takes a bool and returns a function that takes an int and returns an int. This is right-associative, so you would read it as:

(backwards: Bool) -> ((Int) -> Int)

It's easiest to read this if you remember that the first set of parentheses (around Bool) aren't particularly special. They're just like the second set (around Int). (The parentheses aren't actually needed. (Int) -> Int is the same as Int -> Int.)

Realizing this will help when you encounter currying:

func addTwoNumbers(a: Int)(b: Int) -> Int

This is really the same as:

(a: Int) -> (b: Int) -> Int

A function that takes an int and returns a function that takes an int and returns an int.

  • The right-associativity is probably what makes this seem strange, but it does allow you to avoid the extra parentheses. Whether or not that's a good thing... – jscs Jun 9 '14 at 18:20
  • The "returns" operator is right associative in every language I've encountered it. It'd be pretty inconvenient if it were left-associative. – Rob Napier Jun 9 '14 at 18:24
  • Fair enough; I admit it's not an operator I'm familiar with. – jscs Jun 9 '14 at 18:30
  • Every programmer IMO should take a month and become passingly familiar with Haskell. You will not "know Haskell" at that point, but just knowing your way around Haskell helps you understand programming much better (IMO Haskell gets you to the interesting stuff faster than LISP does). learnyouahaskell.com Swift feels more inspired by Scala than Haskell, but learning your way around Haskell is a good way to understand some of what the Swift developers were thinking about. – Rob Napier Jun 9 '14 at 18:37
  • 1
    And in case anyone reads the above and gets the wrong idea: Swift is not a functional language. It just includes some features that are very common in functional languages and so may be unfamiliar to you if you're unfamiliar with functional programming. – Rob Napier Jun 9 '14 at 18:59
2

The -> (Int) -> Int in

func chooseStepFunction(backwards: Bool) -> (Int) -> Int{
return backwards ? stepBackward: stepForward
}

means that the function returns a function that takes an Int as a parameter, and also returns an Int.

You can see it as func chooseStepFunction(backwards: Bool) -> [ (Int) -> Int ] {

1

Notice that it's returning a function. So chooseStepFunction takes a bool and returns a function. The type signature of the function is (Int)->Int.

An arrow indicates a function with the input parameter on the left side and the output on the right.

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