9

I have a problem with programming in C, especially with fopen in Visual Studio. I read about the fopen_s function and added the following line to my project, but it still doesn't work.

_CRT_SECURE_NO_WARNINGS

So I tried using fopen_s in this way:

FILE *fp;
errno_t err;
if ((err = fopen_s(&fp, "C:/File.txt", "rt")) != 0)
    printf("File was not opened\n");
else
    fprintf(fp, "Date: %s, Time: %s, Score: %i \n", __DATE__, __TIME__, score);
fclose(fp);

It's still crashing. What's wrong?

  • When does it crashes ? What does Visual say ? – Antoine C. Jun 9 '14 at 19:08
  • What is "rt" supposed to stand for [might be the error]? This seems to be MSDN/CRT related. Try to find out which error you get by examining your error number (not only compare if it is not zero). As it seems a function called strerror_s is provided for this purpose. Can you have a try? – Matthias W. Jun 9 '14 at 19:10
  • 4
    "it's still doesn't work." is nebulous at-best. Fails to open the file? Fails to detect a failure to open the file? Opens the file but crashes on close? Fails to open the file, reports error, then crashes on close (I'm hedging bets on this one with hyde)? Can you be at least a little more specific? – WhozCraig Jun 9 '14 at 19:10
  • Okay, sorry. It's: "Unhandled exception at 0x00BE347E in Janusze Kosmosu.exe: An invalid parameter was passed to a function that considers invalid parameters fatal. If there is a handler for this exception, the program may be safely continued." – nikodamn Jun 9 '14 at 19:17
  • when the fopen_s() fails, you should output appropriate message and exit program, not continue to the next statement. BTW: the variable 'score' is being used, but not set anywhere AND why bother opening the file for read when you never read from it? – user3629249 Jun 9 '14 at 23:21
9

You use fclose with an invalid fp value, even if opening failed. Add {} around the else branch, at least.

Many developers think it is generally a good idea to use braces everywhere, even with one statement inside them. It's so easy to make a mistake like this if you don't, even for experienced developers. So put them around the then branch too.

  • 1
    then branch? Did you mean else? (second paragraph) – ryyker Jun 9 '14 at 19:12
  • 1
    @ryyker Else branch needs them, I suggest putting them around then branch too. – hyde Jun 9 '14 at 19:14
5

The _s functions are unportable Microsoft inventions which, for the most part, duplicate functionality that already existed under a more portable name. Moreover, blindly changing from the non-_s variant of a function to the _s variant generally does not fix anything. (For instance, silently truncating a string is less disastrous than clobbering the stack but it is still misbehavior which may be exploitable.)

Your problem -- which is not affected by the difference between fopen and fopen_s -- is almost certainly that you are not bothering to check for errors properly. Here is how to check for errors properly:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <errno.h>

int main(int argc, char **argv)
{
    FILE *fp;

    if (argc != 2) {
        fprintf(stderr, "usage: %s filename\n", argv[0]);
        return 2;
    }

    fp = fopen(argv[1], "rb");
    if (!fp) {
        fprintf(stderr, "opening %s: %s\n", argv[1], strerror(errno)); // HERE
        return 1;
    }

    // use 'fp' here...

    return 0;
}

Notice how the line marked // HERE prints both the exact string that was passed to fopen and the result of strerror(errno). It is absolutely essential that you print both the arguments and strerror(errno) whenever a system call fails. (Note: If you do wind up using one of the _s functions that returns an error code rather than setting errno, then you must pass the return value to strerror instead.)

Change your program to do this and you will be able to figure out why it isn't working.

1

On Windows the slashes are different than on Linux, so you may consider using C:\File.txt instead of C:/File.txt.

0

//give it a shot, it's working.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <tchar.h>
#include<iostream>
using namespace std;
int main()
{
    int score = 10;
    FILE *fp;
    errno_t err;
    if ((err = fopen_s(&fp, "C:\\Users\\achea\\Desktop\\File.txt", "w+")) != 0)
    {
        printf("File was not opened\n");
    }
    else
    {
        fprintf(fp, "Date: %s, Time: %s, Score: %i \n", __DATE__, __TIME__, 
        score);
    }
    fclose(fp);
    return 0;
}
-3

Regarding the mode you are using to open,

 err = fopen_s(&fp, "C:/File.txt", "rt")

I never used the letter t as a parameter and don't know what that is for...

But you are opening with R (read) and trying to write...

Try

 err = fopen_s(&fp, "C:/File.txt", "w")

or

 err = fopen_s(&fp, "C:/File.txt", "w+")

Also, you don't really need the err variable. If the fopen call fails, the pointer will be NULL.

  • 3
    -1 for telling people not to record detailed error codes. BTW, "t" is for "text" and is opposed to "b" for "binary." It's not necessary (it's the default) but in some contexts it can make expectations clearer. – zwol Jun 10 '14 at 20:05
  • -1 for solving his problem? Or -1 to make the code more portable? Tell me where he is getting this error code if he try to use it outside visual studio? As far as I remember the signature is: "FILE * fopen ( const char * filename, const char * mode );" And I don't see him using this error code for anything that couldn't be done be checking the pointer. -10 for ... i better not tell – vmp Jun 12 '14 at 17:33
  • 4
    It was -1 specifically for "you don't really need the err variable." You can know that the fopen(_s) failed by checking whether the pointer is NULL, but you need the err variable to know why the operation failed. The OP's program neglects to inspect err, which is a bug. You should not be encouraging them to make it worse; instead (as outlined in my answer) you should have explained the use of strerror and/or perror to turn an error code into a human-readable diagnostic message. – zwol Jun 18 '14 at 20:09

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