82

Coming from objective C you can call function objc_setAssociatedObject between 2 objects to have them maintain a reference, which can be handy if at runtime you don't want an object to be destroyed until its reference is removed also. Does swift have anything similar to this?

130

Here is a simple but complete example derived from jckarter's answer.

It shows how to add a new property to an existing class. It does it by defining a computed property in an extension block. The computed property is stored as an associated object:

import ObjectiveC

// Declare a global var to produce a unique address as the assoc object handle
private var AssociatedObjectHandle: UInt8 = 0

extension MyClass {
    var stringProperty:String {
        get {
            return objc_getAssociatedObject(self, &AssociatedObjectHandle) as! String
        }
        set {
            objc_setAssociatedObject(self, &AssociatedObjectHandle, newValue, objc_AssociationPolicy.OBJC_ASSOCIATION_RETAIN_NONATOMIC)
        }
    }
}

EDIT:

If you need to support getting the value of an uninitialized property and to avoid getting the error unexpectedly found nil while unwrapping an Optional value, you can modify the getter like this:

    get {
        return objc_getAssociatedObject(self, &AssociatedObjectHandle) as? String ?? ""
    }
| improve this answer | |
  • Have you been able to set a function that conforms to a typealias in this fashion? – Morkrom Dec 4 '14 at 23:37
  • 1
    @PhamHoan Int is a Swift native type. Try using NSNumber instead. – Klaas Dec 25 '14 at 17:42
  • 1
    @PhamHoan I added a solution for getting an uninitialized object. – Klaas Dec 26 '14 at 15:34
  • 1
    @Jawwad I guess, it does make no difference. The UInt8 comes from the linked original thread. – Klaas Feb 10 '16 at 19:44
  • 1
    hey @Jacky - what makes you say it should be COPY .. please let us know! – Fattie Jan 23 '17 at 1:45
31

The solution supports all the value types as well, and not only those that are automagically bridged, such as String, Int, Double, etc.

Wrappers

import ObjectiveC

final class Lifted<T> {
    let value: T
    init(_ x: T) {
        value = x
    }
}

private func lift<T>(x: T) -> Lifted<T>  {
    return Lifted(x)
}

func setAssociatedObject<T>(object: AnyObject, value: T, associativeKey: UnsafePointer<Void>, policy: objc_AssociationPolicy) {
    if let v: AnyObject = value as? AnyObject {
        objc_setAssociatedObject(object, associativeKey, v,  policy)
    }
    else {
        objc_setAssociatedObject(object, associativeKey, lift(value),  policy)
    }
}

func getAssociatedObject<T>(object: AnyObject, associativeKey: UnsafePointer<Void>) -> T? {
    if let v = objc_getAssociatedObject(object, associativeKey) as? T {
        return v
    }
    else if let v = objc_getAssociatedObject(object, associativeKey) as? Lifted<T> {
        return v.value
    }
    else {
        return nil
    }
}

A possible Class extension (Example of usage)

extension UIView {

    private struct AssociatedKey {
        static var viewExtension = "viewExtension"
    }

    var referenceTransform: CGAffineTransform? {
        get {
            return getAssociatedObject(self, associativeKey: &AssociatedKey.viewExtension)
        }

        set {
            if let value = newValue {
                setAssociatedObject(self, value: value, associativeKey: &AssociatedKey.viewExtension, policy: objc_AssociationPolicy.OBJC_ASSOCIATION_RETAIN_NONATOMIC)
            }
        }
    }
}
| improve this answer | |
  • Can you please explain me what does those association flags mean? I actually am trying to make nav bar scroll with scrollView so am storing scrollView in extension. Which flags should I use? – meteors Oct 2 '15 at 13:37
  • 1
    Also I'm trying to store an array of [AnyObject] using this method but the getter returns me nil always. Somehow the else if of get is not returning properly the value. – meteors Oct 2 '15 at 19:03
  • The kind of associativity policy you decide to use is up to you, it depends on your program. For further information, I suggest you to check this article, nshipster.com/associated-objects, out. I've tried to store arrays, it seems to be working just fine. Which Swift version are you using by the way? – HepaKKes Oct 3 '15 at 14:50
  • This is brilliant. For Swift 2.3 I ended up moving the Generics from the Lift and using Any instead. I'll do a blog article about this, I think – Dan Rosenstark Nov 10 '16 at 17:38
  • 5
    This got a lot easier in Swift 3. But anyway, here's myarticle based on your answer here: yar2050.com/2016/11/associated-object-support-for-swift-23.html – Dan Rosenstark Nov 10 '16 at 19:53
5

Obviously, this only works with Objective-C objects. After fiddling around with this a bit, here's how to make the calls in Swift:

import ObjectiveC

// Define a variable whose address we'll use as key.
// "let" doesn't work here.
var kSomeKey = "s"

…

func someFunc() {
    objc_setAssociatedObject(target, &kSomeKey, value, UInt(OBJC_ASSOCIATION_RETAIN))

    let value : AnyObject! = objc_getAssociatedObject(target, &kSomeKey)
}
| improve this answer | |
  • I have tried this method but my value object appears to be immediately deallocated when there are no other references to it from swift code. My target object is an SKNode and my value object is a swift class that extends NSObject. Should this work? – nacross Aug 11 '14 at 22:47
  • Actually deinit appears to be called during objc_setAssociatedObject even though the object has just been created and is used further down in the method. – nacross Aug 11 '14 at 23:09
4

Update in Swift 3.0 For example this is a UITextField

import Foundation
import UIKit
import ObjectiveC

// Declare a global var to produce a unique address as the assoc object handle
var AssociatedObjectHandle: UInt8 = 0

extension UITextField
{
    var nextTextField:UITextField {
    get {
        return objc_getAssociatedObject(self, &AssociatedObjectHandle) as! UITextField
    }
    set {
        objc_setAssociatedObject(self, &AssociatedObjectHandle, newValue, .OBJC_ASSOCIATION_RETAIN_NONATOMIC)
        }
    }
}
| improve this answer | |
3

I wrote a modern helper which requires Swift 5.1.

/*
 AssociatedObject.swift

 Copyright © 2020 RFUI.
 https://github.com/BB9z/iOS-Project-Template

 The MIT License
 https://opensource.org/licenses/MIT
 */

import Foundation

/**
 Objective-C associated value wrapper.

 Usage

 ```
 private let fooAssociation = AssociatedObject<String>()
 extension SomeObject {
     var foo: String? {
         get { fooAssociation[self] }
         set { fooAssociation[self] = newValue }
     }
 }
 ```
 */
public final class AssociatedObject<T> {
    private let policy: objc_AssociationPolicy

    /// Creates an associated value wrapper.
    /// - Parameter policy: The policy for the association.
    public init(policy: objc_AssociationPolicy = .OBJC_ASSOCIATION_RETAIN_NONATOMIC) {
        self.policy = policy
    }

    /// Accesses the associated value.
    /// - Parameter index: The source object for the association.
    public subscript(index: AnyObject) -> T? {
        get { objc_getAssociatedObject(index, Unmanaged.passUnretained(self).toOpaque()) as? T }
        set { objc_setAssociatedObject(index, Unmanaged.passUnretained(self).toOpaque(), newValue, policy) }
    }
}

You may be surprised that it even supports Swift structures for free.

Swift struct association

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2

Klaas answer just for Swift 2.1:

import ObjectiveC

let value = NSUUID().UUIDString
var associationKey: UInt8 = 0

objc_setAssociatedObject(parentObject, &associationKey, value, objc_AssociationPolicy.OBJC_ASSOCIATION_RETAIN_NONATOMIC)

let fetchedValue = objc_getAssociatedObject(parentObject, &associationKey) as! String
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0

Just add #import <objc/runtime.h> on your brindging header file to access objc_setAssociatedObject under swift code

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  • 18
    or you can just import ObjectiveC in Swift – newacct Jun 13 '14 at 8:27
0

The above friend has answered your question, but if it is related to closure properties, please note:

```

import UIKit
public extension UICollectionView {

typealias XYRearrangeNewDataBlock = (_ newData: [Any]) -> Void
typealias XYRearrangeOriginaDataBlock = () -> [Any]

// MARK:- associat key
private struct xy_associatedKeys {
    static var originalDataBlockKey = "xy_originalDataBlockKey"
    static var newDataBlockKey = "xy_newDataBlockKey"
}


private class BlockContainer {
    var rearrangeNewDataBlock: XYRearrangeNewDataBlock?
    var rearrangeOriginaDataBlock: XYRearrangeOriginaDataBlock?
}


private var newDataBlock: BlockContainer? {
    get {
        if let newDataBlock = objc_getAssociatedObject(self, &xy_associatedKeys.newDataBlockKey) as? BlockContainer {
            return newDataBlock
        }
        return nil
    }

    set(newValue) {
        objc_setAssociatedObject(self, xy_associatedKeys.newDataBlockKey, newValue, .OBJC_ASSOCIATION_COPY_NONATOMIC)
    }
}
convenience init(collectionVewFlowLayout : UICollectionViewFlowLayout, originalDataBlock: @escaping XYRearrangeOriginaDataBlock, newDataBlock:  @escaping XYRearrangeNewDataBlock) {
    self.init()


    let blockContainer: BlockContainer = BlockContainer()
    blockContainer.rearrangeNewDataBlock = newDataBlock
    blockContainer.rearrangeOriginaDataBlock = originalDataBlock
    self.newDataBlock = blockContainer
}

```

| improve this answer | |

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