I have an objective-C singleton as follows:

 @interface MyModel : NSObject
    + (MyModel*)   model;
    ...


        + (MyModel*) model 
        {
            static MyModel     *singlton = nil;
            static dispatch_once_t onceToken;
            dispatch_once(&onceToken, ^ {
                singlton = [[MyModel alloc] initSharedInstance];
            });
            return singlton;
        }


        - (MyModel*) initSharedInstance
        {
            self = [super init];
            if (self)
            etc.
        }

Which gets called in multiple places within the GUI code as:

[[MyModel model] someMethod];

And therefore the model will get created as a consequence of whichever part of the GUI happens to reference it first.

I'm not sure how to implement the equivalent of accessing the class via [[MyModel model] someMethod] in Swift as all examples of using Swift involve creating an object using an initializer and when Objective C class method code is converted to Swift initializer code there is a problem with it not working when the method does not have parameters.

  • 1
    You should be able to access it as MyModel.model and get the singleton object. it is recommended you change id to instancetype – Jack Jun 10 '14 at 18:37
  • 1
    I get a compilation warning if I do this "let m = MyModel.model". It says: "model is unavailable, use object construction MyModel()" – Gruntcakes Jun 10 '14 at 18:43
  • Its the same compilation error regardless of if its MyModel.model or MyModel.model() – Gruntcakes Jun 10 '14 at 18:51
  • 2
    @Aminoacids: I think your problem is that the method looks like a convenience constructor (along the lines of +[NSArray array]), which causes Swift to treat it specially. Try naming it something more singleton-y like sharedModel. (Can't test this right now, but I think that's what's up.) – Chuck Jun 10 '14 at 20:29
  • @Chuck, yes I renamed it to singleton as in Mr. H's update and it was fine – Gruntcakes Jun 10 '14 at 21:46
up vote 10 down vote accepted

UPDATE ++++++++++

The workaround below is only necessary if you name your singleton method with a name derived from the suffix of the class name i.e. the OPs question the method name is model and the class is called MyModel.

If the method is renamed to something like singleton then it is possible to call it from Swift just like this:

  let m  = MyModel.singleton()

+++++++++++

I don't know if this is good/bad practice but I was able to get around the problem with initializer conversion not working when there are no parameters by adding a dummy init method. So using the code from the other answer as an example:

@interface XYZThing : NSObject
+ (XYZThing*)  thing;
+ (XYZThing*)  thingWithFoo:(int)foo bar:(int)bar;
@end

@implementation XYZThing
+ (XYZThing*) thing
{
    NSLog(@"This is not executed");
    return nil;
}

+ (XYZThing*)thingWithFoo:(int)foo bar:(int)bar
{
    NSLog(@"But this is");
    return nil;
}
@end


...

let thing = XYZThing()
let otherThing = XYZThing(foo:3, bar:7)

With this code above the thing method is not called, but the thingWithFoo:bar: method is.

But if it is changed to this then now the thing method will get called:

    @interface XYZThing : NSObject
    + (XYZThing*)  init;
    + (XYZThing*)  thing;
    + (XYZThing*)  thingWithFoo:(int)foo bar:(int)bar;
    @end


    @implementation XYZThing

    + (XYZThing*) init
    {
         return nil;
    }
    + (XYZThing*) thing
    {
        NSLog(@"Now this is executed");
        return nil;
    }

    + (XYZThing*)thingWithFoo:(int)foo bar:(int)bar
    {
        NSLog(@"And so is this");
        return nil;
    }
    @end


...

    let thing = XYZThing()
    let otherThing = XYZThing(foo:3, bar:7)
  • I don't know exactly why, but the singleton method worked for me. – redent84 Dec 9 '14 at 12:14
  • "let m = MyModel.singleton() as AnyObject" this worked for me. – yucel bayram Feb 10 '17 at 8:29
  • if the property you are trying to access is a custom class object, you should also add that custom class to the bridging header in order to show up. – Juan Boero Aug 9 '17 at 0:59

If the Swift compiler mistakenly identifies a method as a class factory method, you can use the NS_SWIFT_NAME macro, passing the Swift signature of the method to have it imported correctly. For example:

+ (id)recordWithQuality:(double)quality NS_SWIFT_NAME(record(quality:));

so,your method should be this:

+ (MyModel*)model NS_SWIFT_NAME(log());
  • This should be the accepted answer. – erenkabakci Aug 30 '17 at 8:45

Do exactly what the compiler warning tells you to:

MyModel().someMethod()

Read on to see why...


Swift automatically recognizes ObjC conventions for initializers and convenience constructors. If you have a class that looks like this:

@interface XYZThing : NSObject
+ (instancetype)thing;
+ (instancetype)thingWithFoo:(int)foo bar:(int)bar;
@end

...then, when Swift turns them into initializers, it elides the part of the method name that's the generic name of the class (Thing/thing), moves the part of the selector that refers to the parameter to be a parameter label, and drops any prepositions connecting those parts. So the initializer declarations look like this in Swift:

class XYZThing: NSObject [
    init()
    init(foo: Int, bar: Int)
}

and you construct objects like this:

let thing = XYZThing()
let otherThing = XYZThing(foo:3, bar:7)

A followup: because class methods like +[XYZThing thing] are treated like initializers by the ObjC to Swift translator (even if that doesn't seem to fully work right now), that naming pattern is a bad idea for singletons. A singleton retrieval method shouldn't be an initializer, because an initializer always creates a new instance.

A singleton retrieval method should instead have a name that doesn't start with the generic name of the class; e.g. +sharedThing, +defaultThing, +oneThingToRuleThemAll, etc.

  • Thanks, however the process of turning the class methods into initializers does not work if there are no parameters. Thus in your example everything will compile however thing is not invoked but thingWithFoo:bar: is. Therefore I still consider the question unanswered as it is undesirable to add a dummy parameter to the model method and thus break lots of existing Obj-C code that uses it. – Gruntcakes Jun 10 '14 at 19:42
  • Here's another question mentioning the empty class method issue in the answer which I also encountered trying your code out. stackoverflow.com/questions/24093693/… – Gruntcakes Jun 10 '14 at 19:43
  • 1
    Looks like a bug, then. Have you filed one? – rickster Jun 10 '14 at 20:17
  • 1
    I didn't catch initially that this was a singleton-retrieval method. That may or may not have something to do with the unusual behavior (compiler insists on constructor syntax but that doesn't work) you're seeing. Since this isn't an initializer, you shouldn't name it like one (see edited answer). – rickster Jun 10 '14 at 20:25

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