23

In Swift, if a closure holds only a single statement, it automatically returns the value returned from that single statement.

This does not feel very natural in all cases. Let's look at an example:

func StringReturningFunc() -> String {
    return "Test String"
}

// Error: Cannot convert the expressions type '() -> $T0' to type 'String'
let closure: () -> () = {
    StringReturningFunc()
}

As you can see, even though the closure should only call a simple function, it tries to automatically return it's return value, which is of type String, and does not match the return type void.

I can prevent this by implementing the closures body like so:

let _ = StringReturningFunc()

Which feels incredibly odd.

Is there a better way to do this or is this just something I have to live with?

  • 5
    I think this is a good question. But it might help to add an, "Is there a better solution?" to stymie the close votes. – Craig Otis Jun 10 '14 at 20:46
  • 1
    @CraigOtis Edited my question, thanks for the tip. – NSAddict Jun 10 '14 at 20:48
  • I don't understand the point of this, how can you say that closure returns () when your stringreturningfunc explicitly returns a string? – Edgar Aroutiounian Jun 10 '14 at 20:49
  • @EdgarAroutiounian Just because the closure calls stringReturningFunc doesn't mean that it should also return a String. Here it should just return nothing, instead of a String. – NSAddict Jun 10 '14 at 20:53
  • @EdgarAroutiounian He's trying to execute the function and discard the return, however there is an implicit return statement on single-line closures. – Erik Jun 10 '14 at 20:54
25

The reason this happens is the shorthand for single line expression closures. There is an implicit 'return' in your closure as it is written.

let closure: () -> () = {
    StringReturningFunc()
    return
}

Writing it like that should work

  • 2
    Thanks for this tip! If the OP still wants it to be a single line it can be done with let wrapped : () -> Void = { stringReturningFunc(); return } – Erik Jun 10 '14 at 20:55
  • 2
    Is there really no other way to do this without having to explicitly call return? – Mike Jun 14 '14 at 0:26
  • 11
    Couldn't this be fixed in the Swift compiler, if they just detected that the closure was supposed to return Void and therefore didn't try to return the first statement? In all other closures that don't return Void it could use the implicit return. – Richard Venable Nov 4 '14 at 14:53
  • 1
    @SandyChapman In other languages, excluding 'return' is just an implicit 'return void'. You are just used to that convention, and you can get used to this one just as easily. It is good for new languages like Swift, to redefine some of these conventions as software development continues to evolve. – Richard Venable Dec 3 '14 at 15:20
  • 2
    Seems to be fixed as of Xcode Beta Version 6.3 (6D520o). “Implicit returns from single-expression closures” now also work for expressions that return something other than Void. – nmdias Feb 21 '15 at 23:40
0

What about this ... ;)

@discardableResult func StringReturningFunc() -> String {
    return "Test String"
}

// Error: Cannot convert the expressions type '() -> $T0' to type 'String'
let closure: () -> () = {
    StringReturningFunc()
}

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