75

In Swift, I notice there is no @autoreleasepool{} construct, although Swift does use ARC. What is the proper way to manage an autoreleasepool in Swift, or has it been removed for some reason?

117

This is explained in detail in WWDC 2014 session video number 418 "Improving Your App with Instruments", which you can also download as a PDF.

But in short, the syntax is:

autoreleasepool {
  /* code */ 
}
  • 7
    It's important to note that the { must be on the same line as the autoreleasepool, otherwise you have to wrap it in ( ). That really irks me to be honest... – Erik Jun 10 '14 at 22:59
  • 1
    @SiLo really? That sucks. You should file a bug report. – Abhi Beckert Jun 10 '14 at 23:13
  • 19
    @AbhiBeckert @SiLo It's not a bug. autorelease is a function that takes a closure as an argument. This is an example of the short-hand closure-as-last-argument syntax. – Cezary Wojcik Jun 10 '14 at 23:16
  • 1
    @CezaryWojcik Right, but why does it matter if I place the { on a new line instead of right after? – Erik Jun 10 '14 at 23:21
  • 6
    @SiLo Since there are no semicolons, if the closure is on the next line, then there isn't a syntactic guarantee that that closure is supposed to be an argument for the function above it. You can see the same thing in JavaScript when you try to do something like return { ... }. – Cezary Wojcik Jun 10 '14 at 23:32
16

Just FYI, Xcode constructed the full code as follows:

autoreleasepool({ () -> () in
    // code              
})

Guess the parentheses identifies the functions closure.

  • 3
    not sure why anyone de-voted this comment, as he's pointing out that an autorelease pool as far as swift1.2 needs the code to be wrapped in a closure – bolnad Jun 29 '15 at 15:36
7

There is! It's just not really mentioned anywhere.

autoreleasepool {
    Do things....
}

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.