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I've a super weird problem. I use SharpZipLib library to generate .zip. I found that the size of .zip is a little bit bigger than total of my text files. I don't know what's wrong. I also tried to google but I cannot find any related to my case. This is my code :

    protected void CompressFolder(string[] files, string outputPath)
    {
        using (ZipOutputStream s = new ZipOutputStream(File.Create(outputPath)))
        {
            s.SetLevel(0);
            foreach (string path in files)
            {
                ZipEntry entry = new ZipEntry(Path.GetFileName(path));
                entry.DateTime = DateTime.Now;
                entry.Size = new FileInfo(path).Length;
                s.PutNextEntry(entry);
                byte[] buffer = new byte[4096];
                int byteCount = 0;
                using (FileStream input = File.OpenRead(path))
                {
                    byteCount = input.Read(buffer, 0, buffer.Length);
                    while (byteCount > 0)
                    {
                        s.Write(buffer, 0, byteCount);
                        byteCount = input.Read(buffer, 0, buffer.Length);
                    }
                }
            }
        }
    }
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  • 2
    Are you compressing text or a binary / picture / word documents etc? Normally, zipping can result in slightly larger files if your original files are already compressed Jun 11, 2014 at 13:48
  • If you zip a compressed file, the result will be larger than before. Are your files already compressed? Look before answering.
    – user1228
    Jun 11, 2014 at 13:48
  • My files are text files. I tried to compress manually, the zip file size is a lot smaller than the zip file that I got from SharpZipLib. Jun 11, 2014 at 13:52
  • Is your file system already compressing those text files? NTFS offers compression transparently. Jun 11, 2014 at 13:52

1 Answer 1

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The compression level of 0 signals SharpZipLib to store instead of compress.

The larger size is because of the Zip metastructure (filenames etc)

Your solution would then be to change the level to something higher, ie:

s.SetLevel(9);
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