145

How do you simulate Mouse clicks in C# winforms applications?

2
  • 5
    You might want to provide more information so that you can get a useful answer.
    – Andy
    Mar 10, 2010 at 12:19
  • 39
    Tip: If your title is the same as your question, then the title is way too long or the question is way too short. In this case it's the latter, you have to give a lot more context for anyone to have a reasonable chance to give you a useful answer.
    – Guffa
    Mar 10, 2010 at 12:22

7 Answers 7

175

I have combined several sources to produce the code below, which I am currently using. I have also removed the Windows.Forms references so I can use it from console and WPF applications without additional references.

using System;
using System.Runtime.InteropServices;

public class MouseOperations
{
    [Flags]
    public enum MouseEventFlags
    {
        LeftDown = 0x00000002,
        LeftUp = 0x00000004,
        MiddleDown = 0x00000020,
        MiddleUp = 0x00000040,
        Move = 0x00000001,
        Absolute = 0x00008000,
        RightDown = 0x00000008,
        RightUp = 0x00000010
    }

    [DllImport("user32.dll", EntryPoint = "SetCursorPos")]
    [return: MarshalAs(UnmanagedType.Bool)]
    private static extern bool SetCursorPos(int x, int y);      

    [DllImport("user32.dll")]
    [return: MarshalAs(UnmanagedType.Bool)]
    private static extern bool GetCursorPos(out MousePoint lpMousePoint);

    [DllImport("user32.dll")]
    private static extern void mouse_event(int dwFlags, int dx, int dy, int dwData, int dwExtraInfo);

    public static void SetCursorPosition(int x, int y) 
    {
        SetCursorPos(x, y);
    }

    public static void SetCursorPosition(MousePoint point)
    {
        SetCursorPos(point.X, point.Y);
    }

    public static MousePoint GetCursorPosition()
    {
        MousePoint currentMousePoint;
        var gotPoint = GetCursorPos(out currentMousePoint);
        if (!gotPoint) { currentMousePoint = new MousePoint(0, 0); }
        return currentMousePoint;
    }

    public static void MouseEvent(MouseEventFlags value)
    {
        MousePoint position = GetCursorPosition();

        mouse_event
            ((int)value,
             position.X,
             position.Y,
             0,
             0)
            ;
    }

    [StructLayout(LayoutKind.Sequential)]
    public struct MousePoint
    {
        public int X;
        public int Y;

        public MousePoint(int x, int y)
        {
            X = x;
            Y = y;
        }
    }
}
7
  • 2
    I can't see any advantage of this long source code over what posted Marcos Placona 17 months ago.
    – Al Kepp
    Aug 19, 2011 at 12:12
  • 55
    Given the vagueness of the question, I thought people might benefit from an example that allows them to do more than just a left click suck a right or middle click or allow click and drag.
    – Keith
    Aug 19, 2011 at 15:01
  • 2
    Works great. I came here looking for something like this
    – CSharpie
    Feb 13, 2016 at 7:08
  • This is what I am searching, but how do you click down, move mouse somewhere else and then release?? Dec 26, 2016 at 11:15
  • 2
    @ninjaxelite I am guessing you send 1. SetCursorPos, 2. MouseEvent(LeftButtonDown), 3. SetCursorPos, 4. MouseEvent(LeftButtonUp). Potentially wrap it in a helper method Apr 30, 2018 at 16:13
146

An example I found somewhere here in the past. Might be of some help:

using System;
using System.Windows.Forms;
using System.Runtime.InteropServices;

public class Form1 : Form
{
   [DllImport("user32.dll",CharSet=CharSet.Auto, CallingConvention=CallingConvention.StdCall)]
   public static extern void mouse_event(uint dwFlags, uint dx, uint dy, uint cButtons, uint dwExtraInfo);
   //Mouse actions
   private const int MOUSEEVENTF_LEFTDOWN = 0x02;
   private const int MOUSEEVENTF_LEFTUP = 0x04;
   private const int MOUSEEVENTF_RIGHTDOWN = 0x08;
   private const int MOUSEEVENTF_RIGHTUP = 0x10;

   public Form1()
   {
   }

   public void DoMouseClick()
   {
      //Call the imported function with the cursor's current position
      uint X = (uint)Cursor.Position.X;
      uint Y = (uint)Cursor.Position.Y;
      mouse_event(MOUSEEVENTF_LEFTDOWN | MOUSEEVENTF_LEFTUP, X, Y, 0, 0);
   }

   //...other code needed for the application
}
7
  • 12
    Somewhere being here perhaps?
    – mpen
    Jan 29, 2012 at 23:25
  • 3
    Well played. Added reference to the original answer Mar 27, 2012 at 16:09
  • 2
    I'm getting an error with this code: A call to PInvoke function 'MyForm!MyForm.Form1::mouse_event' has unbalanced the stack. This is likely because the managed PInvoke signature does not match the unmanaged target signature. Check that the calling convention and parameters of the PInvoke signature match the target unmanaged signature. Any ideas?
    – Abdulla
    Jun 8, 2012 at 22:53
  • 12
    You need to cast the X and Y to uints.
    – Dibesjr
    Jan 5, 2013 at 19:10
  • 1
    Works perfectly need some changes in cursor position as per requirements... Apr 30, 2019 at 12:36
15

Some controls, like Button in System.Windows.Forms, have a "PerformClick" method to do just that.

1
  • If the control doesn't have a PerformClick method, you can extend/add one, just needs to call OnMouseClick with a suitable MouseEventArgs argument. Apr 12, 2018 at 22:46
11
Mouse.Click();

Microsoft.VisualStudio.TestTools.UITesting

4
  • 1
    It's kind of weird that this was isolated in the Visual Studio UI test namespace, but I'll take that over PInvoke any day that I don't need to filter events by-device. May 19, 2018 at 5:51
  • 2
    Looks like Visual Studio Community edition doesn't ship with this DLL.
    – C.M.
    Aug 30, 2018 at 23:07
  • 4
    I just spent an hour trying to get this to work by copying DLLs over from a "coded UI test" project to another one and unless you're using a "coded UI test" project type, my advice is: don't bother. Even when I copied all the DLLs necessary it threw a InvalidUITestExtensionPackageException, so it seems to be extremely fussy about running in a particular project type, sadly.
    – Jez
    Oct 20, 2018 at 9:31
  • @Jez - Handy to know, thanks. Not seen any issues yet myself, but now I at least know some exist ;0)
    – Rusty Nail
    Oct 22, 2018 at 1:05
5

I have tried the code that Marcos posted and it didn't worked for me. Whatever i was given to the Y coordinate the cursor didn't moved on Y axis. The code below will work if you want the position of the cursor relative to the left-up corner of your desktop, not relative to your application.

    [DllImport("user32.dll", CharSet = CharSet.Auto, CallingConvention = CallingConvention.StdCall)]
    public static extern void mouse_event(long dwFlags, long dx, long dy, long cButtons, long dwExtraInfo);
    private const int MOUSEEVENTF_LEFTDOWN = 0x02;
    private const int MOUSEEVENTF_LEFTUP = 0x04;
    private const int MOUSEEVENTF_MOVE = 0x0001;

    public void DoMouseClick()
    {
        X = Cursor.Position.X;
        Y = Cursor.Position.Y;

        //move to coordinates
        pt = (Point)pc.ConvertFromString(X + "," + Y);
        Cursor.Position = pt;       

        //perform click            
        mouse_event(MOUSEEVENTF_LEFTDOWN, 0, 0, 0, 0);
        mouse_event(MOUSEEVENTF_LEFTUP, 0, 0, 0, 0);
    }

I only use mouse_event function to actually perform the click. You can give X and Y what coordinates you want, i used values from textbox:

            X = Convert.ToInt32(tbX.Text);
            Y = Convert.ToInt32(tbY.Text);
1
  • this is the right one for me, basically Cursor.Position is good enough for positioning the mouse cursor to wherever you want, then use WIN32API to do the actual click.
    – Ge Rong
    Sep 20, 2017 at 8:32
0

I use the InvokeOnClick() method. It takes two arguments: Control and EventArgs. If you need the EventArgs, then create an instance of it and pass it in, else use InvokeOnClick(controlToClick, null);. You can use a variety of Mouse event related arguments that derive from EventArgs such as MouseEventArgs.

-1

they are some needs i can't see to dome thing like Keith or Marcos Placona did instead of just doing

using System;
using System.Windows.Forms;

namespace WFsimulateMouseClick
{
    public partial class Form1 : Form
    {
        public Form1()
        {
            InitializeComponent();
        }

        private void Form1_Load(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            button1_Click(button1, new MouseEventArgs(System.Windows.Forms.MouseButtons.Left, 1, 1, 1, 1));

            //by the way
            //button1.PerformClick();
            // and
            //button1_Click(button1, new EventArgs());
            // are the same
        }

        private void button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            MessageBox.Show("clicked");
        }
    }
}
4
  • 1
    You can also do button1_Click(null, null) if you don't need either of those parameters.
    – sab669
    Oct 15, 2013 at 15:43
  • @sab669 sure but it still depends on his needs :-)
    – WiiMaxx
    Oct 17, 2013 at 7:58
  • you should not use null in the second parameter, it will throw a NullReferenceException, instead use EventArgs.Empty
    – Etor Madiv
    Jul 12, 2016 at 19:46
  • 1
    @EtorMadiv like i said before it depends on what you are trying todo ..., because if you use it like i did above you wont get a NullReferenceException
    – WiiMaxx
    Jul 12, 2016 at 22:37

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