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I have trained xor neural network in MATLAB and got these weights:

iw: [-2.162 2.1706; 2.1565 -2.1688]

lw: [-3.9174 -3.9183]

b{1} [2.001; 2.0033]

b{2} [3.8093]

Just from curiosity I have tried to write MATLAB code which computes the output of this network (two neurons in the hidden layer, and one in the output, TANSIG activation function).

Code that I got:

l1w = [-2.162 2.1706; 2.1565 -2.1688];
l2w = [-3.9174 -3.9183];
b1w = [2.001 2.0033];
b2w = [3.8093];

input = [1, 0];

out1 = tansig (input(1)*l1w(1,1) + input(2)*l1w(1,2) + b1w(1));
out2 = tansig (input(1)*l1w(2,1) + input(2)*l1w(2,2) + b1w(2));
out3 = tansig (out1*l2w(1) + out2*l2w(2) + b2w(1))

The problem is when input is lets say [1,1], it outputs -0.9989, when [0,1] 0.4902. While simulating network generated with MATLAB outputs adequately are 0.00055875 and 0.99943.

What am I doing wrong?

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  • 2
    why dont you post the actual code you used to build and train the network?
    – Amro
    Mar 10, 2010 at 20:25

2 Answers 2

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I wrote a simple example of an XOR network. I used newpr, which defaults to tansig transfer function for both hidden and output layers.

input = [0 0 1 1; 0 1 0 1];               %# each column is an input vector
ouputActual = [0 1 1 0];

net = newpr(input, ouputActual, 2);       %# 1 hidden layer with 2 neurons
net.divideFcn = '';                       %# use the entire input for training

net = init(net);                          %# initialize net
net = train(net, input, ouputActual);     %# train
outputPredicted = sim(net, input);        %# predict

then we check the result by computing the output ourselves. The important thing to remember is that by default, inputs/outputs are scaled to the [-1,1] range:

scaledIn = (2*input - 1);           %# from [0,1] to [-1,1]
for i=1:size(input,2)
    in = scaledIn(:,i);             %# i-th input vector
    hidden(1) = tansig( net.IW{1}(1,1)*in(1) + net.IW{1}(1,2)*in(2) + net.b{1}(1) );
    hidden(2) = tansig( net.IW{1}(2,1)*in(1) + net.IW{1}(2,2)*in(2) + net.b{1}(2) );
    out(i) = tansig( hidden(1)*net.LW{2,1}(1) + hidden(2)*net.LW{2,1}(2) + net.b{2} );
end
scaledOut = (out+1)/2;              %# from [-1,1] to [0,1]

or more efficiently expressed as matrix product in one line:

scaledIn = (2*input - 1);           %# from [0,1] to [-1,1]
out = tansig( net.LW{2,1} * tansig( net.IW{1}*scaledIn + repmat(net.b{1},1,size(input,2)) ) + repmat(net.b{2},1,size(input,2)) );
scaledOut = (1 + out)/2;            %# from [-1,1] to [0,1]
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  • Excellent. Helped me a lot. Dec 8, 2020 at 6:42
-1

You usually don't use a sigmoid on your output layer--are you sure you should have the tansig on out3? And are you sure you are looking at the weights of the appropriately trained network? It looks like you've got a network trained to do XOR on [1,1] [1,-1] [-1,1] and [-1,-1], with +1 meaning "xor" and -1 meaning "same".

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  • Then how do you normalize your output if you don't use Sigmoid in the output layer? Furthermore how do you measure error if your output is not normalized?
    – Kiril
    Mar 11, 2010 at 0:21
  • For a classifier, you pick the output with the highest value (or toggle at the 50% point) to make your decision. You don't need the nonlinearity. In this case it's okay to do it, but it doesn't really add much.
    – Rex Kerr
    Mar 11, 2010 at 1:16
  • 1
    the problem of using a linear function in the output layer becomes apparent when you want to get posterior probabilities of each class in addition to the classifications..
    – Amro
    Mar 11, 2010 at 3:34
  • @Amro: Fair enough. If you want them to be forced into the range (0,1), then yes, you should use 1/(1+exp(-y)); you get approximate probabilities either way but you might exceed 1 (or fall below 0) if you just treat it as a function approximation. Whether that is a problem depends on the application.
    – Rex Kerr
    Mar 11, 2010 at 5:34

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