208

I use the following simple code to parse some arguments; note that one of them is required. Unfortunately, when the user runs the script without providing the argument, the displayed usage/help text does not indicate that there is a non-optional argument, which I find very confusing. How can I get python to indicate that an argument is not optional?

Here is the code:

import argparse
if __name__ == '__main__':
    parser = argparse.ArgumentParser(
        description='Foo')
    parser.add_argument('-i','--input', help='Input file name', required=True)
    parser.add_argument('-o','--output', help='Output file name', default="stdout")
    args = parser.parse_args()
    print ("Input file: %s" % args.input )
    print ("Output file: %s" % args.output )

When running above code without providing the required argument, I get the following output:

usage: foo.py [-h] -i INPUT [-o OUTPUT]

Foo

optional arguments:
    -h, --help            show this help message and exit
    -i INPUT, --input INPUT
                          Input file name
    -o OUTPUT, --output OUTPUT
                          Output file name
  • 5
    In the usage line, the -i INPUT part is not surrounded by square brackets, which subtlety indicates that is indeed, required. Also, you can manually explain that through the help param – Jaime RGP Jun 12 '14 at 9:15
  • 7
    @JaimeRGP Yes, but that's not sufficient, of course, and it's also less than prominent. The assigned group name optional arguments for the required arguments is still misleading. – Acumenus Oct 5 '16 at 6:13
292

Parameters starting with - or -- are usually considered optional. All other parameters are positional parameters and as such required by design (like positional function arguments). It is possible to require optional arguments, but this is a bit against their design. Since they are still part of the non-positional arguments, they will still be listed under the confusing header “optional arguments” even if they are required. The missing square brackets in the usage part however show that they are indeed required.

See also the documentation:

In general, the argparse module assumes that flags like -f and --bar indicate optional arguments, which can always be omitted at the command line.

Note: Required options are generally considered bad form because users expect options to be optional, and thus they should be avoided when possible.

That being said, the headers “positional arguments” and “optional arguments” in the help are generated by two argument groups in which the arguments are automatically separated into. Now, you could “hack into it” and change the name of the optional ones, but a far more elegant solution would be to create another group for “required named arguments” (or whatever you want to call them):

parser = argparse.ArgumentParser(description='Foo')
parser.add_argument('-o', '--output', help='Output file name', default='stdout')
requiredNamed = parser.add_argument_group('required named arguments')
requiredNamed.add_argument('-i', '--input', help='Input file name', required=True)
parser.parse_args(['-h'])
usage: [-h] [-o OUTPUT] -i INPUT

Foo

optional arguments:
  -h, --help            show this help message and exit
  -o OUTPUT, --output OUTPUT
                        Output file name

required named arguments:
  -i INPUT, --input INPUT
                        Input file name
  • I have been having the same issue. I tried you solution. It does add the arguments to the new group but my code doesn't seem to work after that. Any solutions would be appreciated. Link to my code - pastebin.com/PvC2aujz – Zarar Mahmud Apr 13 '19 at 19:45
  • 1
    @ZararMahmud: You are passing in empty arguments in line 24 of your code: parser.parse_args([]) Instead, use parser.parse_args() with no arguments to capture the contents of sys.argv. Per argparse – Devin Jun 12 '19 at 13:50
  • @poke: Nice solution! But this doesn't help in case you need mutual exclusive groups, or am I missing anything? – Judge Jan 16 at 15:40
71

Since I prefer to list required arguments before optional, I hack around it via:

    parser = argparse.ArgumentParser()
    parser._action_groups.pop()
    required = parser.add_argument_group('required arguments')
    optional = parser.add_argument_group('optional arguments')
    required.add_argument('--required_arg', required=True)
    optional.add_argument('--optional_arg')
    return parser.parse_args()

and this outputs:

usage: main.py [-h] [--required_arg REQUIRED_ARG]
               [--optional_arg OPTIONAL_ARG]

required arguments:
  --required_arg REQUIRED_ARG

optional arguments:
  --optional_arg OPTIONAL_ARG

I can live without 'help' showing up in the optional arguments group.

  • 3
    Does this actually force argparse to treat any of the arguments as required? – Anthony Oct 12 '17 at 19:41
  • 5
    I think the 'required' argument still needs to be set when adding an argument. – Karl Rosaen Oct 13 '17 at 15:13
  • That's really nice. – Paul Cezanne Jan 12 '18 at 21:26
  • 6
    @Anthony - no you need the 'required=True' in add_argument for that. The above answer just illustrates argument grouping. – user2275693 Feb 28 '18 at 16:10
41

Building off of @Karl Rosaen

parser = argparse.ArgumentParser()
optional = parser._action_groups.pop() # Edited this line
required = parser.add_argument_group('required arguments')
# remove this line: optional = parser...
required.add_argument('--required_arg', required=True)
optional.add_argument('--optional_arg')
parser._action_groups.append(optional) # added this line
return parser.parse_args()

and this outputs:

usage: main.py [-h] [--required_arg REQUIRED_ARG]
           [--optional_arg OPTIONAL_ARG]

required arguments:
  --required_arg REQUIRED_ARG

optional arguments:
  -h, --help                    show this help message and exit
  --optional_arg OPTIONAL_ARG
  • 1
    BTW, are there any ways (methods) how to get access to _action_group without accessing protected member? In my case I need to add some argument to already existent (custom) group. – machin Apr 22 '17 at 9:21
  • This is great. Solves the --help item showing up in a second optional list. – Jeremy Nov 18 '17 at 19:17
10

One more time, building off of @RalphyZ

This one doesn't break the exposed API.

from argparse import ArgumentParser, SUPPRESS
# Disable default help
parser = ArgumentParser(add_help=False)
required = parser.add_argument_group('required arguments')
optional = parser.add_argument_group('optional arguments')

# Add back help 
optional.add_argument(
    '-h',
    '--help',
    action='help',
    default=SUPPRESS,
    help='show this help message and exit'
)
required.add_argument('--required_arg', required=True)
optional.add_argument('--optional_arg')

Which will show the same as above and should survive future versions:

usage: main.py [-h] [--required_arg REQUIRED_ARG]
           [--optional_arg OPTIONAL_ARG]

required arguments:
  --required_arg REQUIRED_ARG

optional arguments:
  -h, --help                    show this help message and exit
  --optional_arg OPTIONAL_ARG
  • Can you explain how RalphyZ's answer breaks the exposed API? – jeremysprofile Sep 19 '19 at 15:46
  • 3
    _action_groups is intended for internal use only. Therefore, there is no compatibility guarantee across versions. – Bryan_D Sep 20 '19 at 19:47

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