30

In the Swift "Tour" documentation, there's an exercise where you build on the following function to average a set of numbers:

func sumOf(numbers: Int...) -> Int {
    var sum = 0
    for number in numbers {
        sum += number
    }
    return sum
}

I can make this work using something like the following:

func averageOf(numbers: Double...) -> Double {
    var sum: Double = 0, countOfNumbers: Double = 0
    for number in numbers {
        sum += number
        countOfNumbers++
    }
    var result: Double = sum / countOfNumbers
    return result
}

My question is, why do I have to cast everything as a Double to make it work? If I try to work with integers, like so:

func averageOf(numbers: Int...) -> Double {
    var sum = 0, countOfNumbers = 0
    for number in numbers {
        sum += number
        countOfNumbers++
    }
    var result: Double = sum / countOfNumbers
    return result
}

I get the following error: Could not find an overload for '/' that accepts the supplied arguments

  • var result: Double = Double(sum) / Double(countOfNumbers), or you can overload the operator, if you'd like to. – holex Jun 12 '14 at 9:41
  • 1
    What result are you expecting? The integer truncated average cast as double, or the average as if the ints were doubles? (ie should [4,3] return 3.5 (7.0/2) or 3 (7/2)?) – Joachim Isaksson Jun 12 '14 at 9:42
  • You should know that you're supposed to RTFM for something trivial like integer division. – Pescolly Mar 21 '16 at 4:23
39

The OP seems to know how the code has to look like but he is explicitly asking why it is not working the other way.

So, "explicitly" is part of the answer he is looking for: Apple writes inside the "Language Guide" in chapter "The Basics" -> "Integer and Floating-Point Conversion":

Conversions between integer and floating-point numeric types must be made explicit

  • 2
    yes, thanks that's exactly what I'm after. Intuitively, I would expect that if I cast the result (variable or return value) as a Double, that I've told the compiler what to do. I have not read that far into the language guide yet, so I didn't know that. – Jack James Jun 12 '14 at 10:48
24

you just need to do this:

func averageOf(numbers: Int...) -> Double {
    var sum = 0, countOfNumbers = 0
    for number in numbers {
        sum += number
        countOfNumbers++
    }
    var result: Double = Double(sum) / Double(countOfNumbers)
    return result
}
11

You are assigning the output of / to a variable of type Double, so Swift thinks you want to call this function:

func /(lhs: Double, rhs: Double) -> Double

But the arguments you're passing it are not Doubles and Swift doesn't do implicit casting.

  • Thanks, that also helps, I did not realise that "/" was actually just a regular function. – Jack James Jun 12 '14 at 10:51
  • 1
    This was a real aha for me and could be the best answer. / is a function which accepts 2 arguments both of which must be doubles. It explains the need to cast before doing the division and explains the error message xcode produces. – jamesrward Feb 28 '15 at 5:31
6

that may be helpful:

func averageOf(numbers: Int...) -> Double {
    var sum = 0, countOfNumbers = 0
    for number in numbers {
        sum += number
        countOfNumbers++
    }
    var result: Double = Double(sum) / Double(countOfNumbers)
    return result
}

OR

overloading the / operator can be also a solution, like in Swift 4.x that would look like:

infix operator /: MultiplicationPrecedence
public func /<T: FixedWidthInteger>(lhs: T, rhs: T) -> Double {
    return Double(lhs) / Double(rhs)
}
3

I don't find a necessity for a Forced Division. Normal division operator works though. In the following code,

func average(numbers:Int...)->Float{
    var sum = 0
    for number in numbers{
        sum += number
    }
    var average: Float = 0
    average = (Float (sum) / Float(numbers.count))
    return average
}
let averageResult = average(20,10,30)
averageResult

Here, two float values are divided, of course after type casting as i am storing the result in a float variable and returning the same.

Note: I have not used an extra variable to count the number of parameters. "numbers" are considered as array, as the functions in Swift take a variable number of arguments into an array. "numbers.count" (Similar to Objective C) will return the count of the parameters being passed.

1

Try this but notice swift doesn't like to divide by integers that are initialized to zero or could become zero so you must use &/ to force the division. this code is a little verbose but it is easy to understand and it gives the correct answer in integer not floating point or double

func sumOf(numbers: Int...) -> Int {
var sum = 0
var i = 0
var avg = 1
for number in numbers {
    sum += number
    i += 1
}
avg = sum &/ i
return avg
}
sumOf()
sumOf(42, 597, 12)
1

There's no reason to manually track of the number of arguments when you can just get it directly.

func sumOf(numbers: Int...) -> Int {
    var sum = 0
    for number in numbers {
        sum += number
    }
    let average = sum &/ numbers.count
    return average
}

sumOf()
sumOf(42, 597, 12)

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