86

I'm learning swift recently, but I have a basic problem that can't find an answer

I want to get something like

var a:Int = 3
var b:Int = 3 
println( pow(a,b) ) // 27

but the pow function can work with double number only, it doesn't work with integer, and I can't even cast the int to double by something like Double(a) or a.double()...

Why it doesn't supply the power of integer? it will definitely return an integer without ambiguity ! and Why I can't cast a integer to a double? it just change 3 to 3.0 (or 3.00000... whatever)

if I got two integer and I want to do the power operation, how can I do it smoothly?

Thanks!

  • These type declarations are wrong – Edgar Aroutiounian Jun 13 '14 at 2:19
  • most languages don't have an integer power function due to this reason – phuclv Oct 6 '17 at 2:05
  • 1
    @phuclv's note points to a great discussion on the topic. I would change the text in the link to "these reasons" – eharo2 May 20 at 16:49

16 Answers 16

73

If you like, you could declare an infix operator to do it.

// Put this at file level anywhere in your project
infix operator ^^ { associativity left precedence 160 }
func ^^ (radix: Int, power: Int) -> Int {
    return Int(pow(Double(radix), Double(power)))
}

// ...
// Then you can do this...
let i = 2 ^^ 3
// ... or
println("2³ = \(2 ^^ 3)") // Prints 2³ = 8

I used two carets so you can still use the XOR operator.

Update for Swift 3

In Swift 3 the "magic number" precedence is replaced by precedencegroups:

precedencegroup PowerPrecedence { higherThan: MultiplicationPrecedence }
infix operator ^^ : PowerPrecedence
func ^^ (radix: Int, power: Int) -> Int {
    return Int(pow(Double(radix), Double(power)))
}

// ...
// Then you can do this...
let i2 = 2 ^^ 3
// ... or
print("2³ = \(2 ^^ 3)") // Prints 2³ = 8
  • So if you wanted to do this for Floats, would you do this: infix operator ^^ { } func ^^ (radix: Float, power: Float) -> Float { return Float(pow(Double(radix), Double(power))) } – padapa Apr 17 '15 at 1:04
  • func ^^ (radix: Double, power: Double) -> Double { return Double(pow(Double(radix), Double(power))) } – padapa Apr 17 '15 at 1:20
  • 3
    I found this didn't quite behave as I expected because the precedence was off. For an exponentiative operator, set precedence to 160 (see developer.apple.com/library/ios/documentation/Swift/Conceptual/… and developer.apple.com/library/ios/documentation/Swift/Conceptual/…) like so: infix operator ^^ { precedence 160 } func ^^... and so on – Tim Camber May 26 '15 at 2:34
  • I really like this solution, but with Swift 3 it does not work. Any idea how to make it work? – Vanya Sep 19 '16 at 18:51
  • 1
    func p(_ b: Bool) -> Double { return b?-1:1 } ? – Grimxn Sep 23 '16 at 5:50
44

Other than that your variable declarations have syntax errors, this works exactly how you expected it to. All you have to do is cast a and b to Double and pass the values to pow. Then, if you're working with 2 Ints and you want an Int back on the other side of the operation, just cast back to Int.

import Darwin 

let a: Int = 3
let b: Int = 3

let x: Int = Int(pow(Double(a),Double(b)))
  • Thank you for your code! – ssowri1 Apr 22 at 11:36
10

Sometimes, casting an Int to a Double is not a viable solution. At some magnitudes there is a loss of precision in this conversion. For example, the following code does not return what you might intuitively expect.

Double(Int.max - 1) < Double(Int.max) // false!

If you need precision at high magnitudes and don't need to worry about negative exponents — which can't be generally solved with integers anyway — then this implementation of the tail-recursive exponentiation-by-squaring algorithm is your best bet. According to this SO answer, this is "the standard method for doing modular exponentiation for huge numbers in asymmetric cryptography."

// using Swift 5.0
func pow<T: BinaryInteger>(_ base: T, _ power: T) -> T {
    func expBySq(_ y: T, _ x: T, _ n: T) -> T {
        precondition(n >= 0)
        if n == 0 {
            return y
        } else if n == 1 {
            return y * x
        } else if n.isMultiple(of: 2) {
            return expBySq(y, x * x, n / 2)
        } else { // n is odd
            return expBySq(y * x, x * x, (n - 1) / 2)
        }
    }

    return expBySq(1, base, power) 
}

Note: in this example I've used a generic T: BinaryInteger. This is so you can use Int or UInt or any other integer-like type.

  • And of course you can always define this as an operator (as the more popular answers suggest) or an extension to Int or you can have those things call this free function — whatever your heart desires. – mklbtz Feb 7 '17 at 16:26
5

If you really want an 'Int only' implementation and don't want to coerce to/from Double, you'll need to implement it. Here is a trivial implementation; there are faster algorithms but this will work:

func pow (base:Int, power:UInt) -> Int {
  var answer : Int = 1
  for _ in 0..power { answer *= base }
  return answer
}

> pow (2, 4)
$R3: Int = 16
> pow (2, 8)
$R4: Int = 256
> pow (3,3)
$R5: Int = 27

In a real implementation you'd probably want some error checking.

  • This is a completely valid answer. There are some instances where converting Ints to Doubles loses precision, and so that is not a viable solution for Int pow. Just try running Double(Int.max - 1) < Double(Int.max) in a Swift 3 REPL and you may be surprised. – mklbtz Aug 18 '16 at 14:00
  • 2
    To shorten it up, you could implement this with a reduce call. return (2...power).reduce(base) { result, _ in result * base } – mklbtz Aug 18 '16 at 14:00
  • 1
    Perhaps you can get rid of the precondition by making power a UInt – hashemi Feb 6 '17 at 14:47
4

little detail more

   infix operator ^^ { associativity left precedence 160 }
   func ^^ (radix: Int, power: Int) -> Int {
       return Int(pow(CGFloat(radix), CGFloat(power)))
   }

swift - Binary Expressions

4

If you're disinclined towards operator overloading (although the ^^ solution is probably clear to someone reading your code) you can do a quick implementation:

let pwrInt:(Int,Int)->Int = { a,b in return Int(pow(Double(a),Double(b))) }
pwrInt(3,4) // 81
4

mklbtz is correct about exponentiation by squaring being the standard algorithm for computing integer powers, but the tail-recursive implementation of the algorithm seems a bit confusing. See http://www.programminglogic.com/fast-exponentiation-algorithms/ for a non-recursive implementation of exponentiation by squaring in C. I've attempted to translate it to Swift here:

func expo(_ base: Int, _ power: Int) -> Int {
    var result = 1

    while (power != 0){
        if (power%2 == 1){
            result *= base
        }
        power /= 2
        base *= base
    }
    return result
}

Of course, this could be fancied up by creating an overloaded operator to call it and it could be re-written to make it more generic so it worked on anything that implemented the IntegerType protocol. To make it generic, I'd probably start with something like

    func expo<T:IntegerType>(_ base: T, _ power: T) -> T {
    var result : T = 1

But, that is probably getting carried away.

  • 1
    Very nice! For doing this generically in Swift > 4.0 (Xcode 9.0), you'd want to use BinaryInteger. IntegerType was deprecated. – mklbtz Jun 26 '18 at 14:29
3

Combining the answers into an overloaded set of functions (and using "**" instead of "^^" as some other languages use - clearer to me):

// http://stackoverflow.com/questions/24196689/how-to-get-the-power-of-some-integer-in-swift-language
// Put this at file level anywhere in your project
infix operator ** { associativity left precedence 160 }
func ** (radix: Double, power: Double) -> Double { return pow(radix, power) }
func ** (radix: Int,    power: Int   ) -> Double { return pow(Double(radix), Double(power)) }
func ** (radix: Float,  power: Float ) -> Double { return pow(Double(radix), Double(power)) }

When using Float, you may lose precision. If using numeric literals and a mix of integers and non-integers, you will end up with Double by default. I personally like the ability to use a mathematical expression instead of a function like pow(a, b) for stylistic/readability reasons, but that's just me.

Any operators that would cause pow() to throw an error will also cause these functions to throw an error, so the burden of error checking still lies with the code using the power function anyway. KISS, IMHO.

Using the native pow() function allows to eg take square roots (2 ** 0.5) or inverse (2 ** -3 = 1/8). Because of the possibility to use inverse or fractional exponents, I wrote all my code to return the default Double type of the pow() function, which should return the most precision (if I remember the documentation correctly). If needed, this can be type-casted down to Int or Float or whatever, possibly with the loss of precision.

2 ** -3  = 0.125
2 ** 0.5 = 1.4142135623731
2 ** 3   = 8
  • pow() is not suitable for large calculation where fractional part is also very important. For me your answer gives a hint. Thanks:) – Mahendra Mar 16 '18 at 9:17
3

It turns out you can also use pow(). For example, you can use the following to express 10 to the 9th.

pow(10, 9)

Along with pow, powf() returns a float instead of a double. I have only tested this on Swift 4 and macOS 10.13.

  • 1
    pow(a, b) returns NaN if b < 0 ; so you could add a test for this : let power = (b >= 0) ? pow(a, b) : 1 / pow(a, -b) ; note that a must be declared as Decimal let a : Decimal = 2 ; let b = -3 – claude31 May 12 '18 at 8:24
  • which framework to import for using pow function – DShah Feb 3 at 13:27
2

To calculate power(2, n), simply use:

let result = 2 << (n-1)
1

Or just :

var a:Int = 3
var b:Int = 3
println(pow(Double(a),Double(b)))
1

Swift 4.x version

precedencegroup ExponentiationPrecedence {
  associativity: right
  higherThan: MultiplicationPrecedence
}

infix operator ^^: ExponentiationPrecedence
public func ^^ (radix: Float, power: Float) -> Float {
  return pow((radix), (power))
}

public func ^^ (radix: Double, power: Double) -> Double {
  return pow((radix), (power))
}

public func ^^ (radix: Int, power: Int) -> Int {
  return NSDecimalNumber(decimal: pow(Decimal(radix), power)).intValue
}
1

In Swift 5:

extension Int{
    func expo(_ power: Int) -> Int {
        var result = 1
        var powerNum = power
        var tempExpo = self
        while (powerNum != 0){
        if (powerNum%2 == 1){
            result *= tempExpo
        }
        powerNum /= 2
        tempExpo *= tempExpo
        }
        return result
    }
}

Use like this

2.expo(5) // pow(2, 5)

Thanks to @Paul Buis's answer.

0

Trying to combine the overloading, I tried to use generics but couldn't make it work. I finally figured to use NSNumber instead of trying to overload or use generics. This simplifies to the following:

typealias Dbl = Double // Shorter form
infix operator ** {associativity left precedence 160}
func ** (lhs: NSNumber, rhs: NSNumber) -> Dbl {return pow(Dbl(lhs), Dbl(rhs))}

The following code is the same function as above but implements error checking to see if the parameters can be converted to Doubles successfully.

func ** (lhs: NSNumber, rhs: NSNumber) -> Dbl {
    // Added (probably unnecessary) check that the numbers converted to Doubles
    if (Dbl(lhs) ?? Dbl.NaN) != Dbl.NaN && (Dbl(rhs) ?? Dbl.NaN) != Dbl.NaN {
        return pow(Dbl(lhs), Dbl(rhs))
    } else {
        return Double.NaN
    }
}
-1

I like this better

func ^ (left:NSNumber, right: NSNumber) -> NSNumber {
    return pow(left.doubleValue,right.doubleValue)
}
var a:NSNumber = 3
var b:NSNumber = 3 
println( a^b ) // 27
  • 2
    That replaces the standard xor operator. Using this will make your code behave in a very unexpected way to anyone who doesn't know you're overriding the single karat. – wjl Mar 25 '15 at 20:08
-3
func calc (base:Int, number:Int) -> Int {
    var answer : Int = base
    for _ in 2...number {answer *= base } 
    return answer
}

Example:

calc (2,2)
  • 1
    It's good practice to explain why your code offers a solution, rather than just dumping code into an answer. – Rudi Kershaw Jul 24 '14 at 15:28
  • 1
    And it's far from a correct power function. What about 0 as an exponent or any negative value. – macbirdie Nov 13 '14 at 14:00
  • Also, the name 'calc" is too generic to be used in such a specific operation.. cal(2,2) can mean any possible calculation you want to apply to 2 numbers... 2+2, 2-2, 2*2, 2/2, 2pow2, 2root2, etc. – eharo2 May 20 at 17:12

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