16

I would like to create a function that checks if a numeric value passed as an argument has a value greater than zero. Something like this:

public bool IsGreaterThanZero(object value)
{
    if(value is int)
    {
        return ((int)value > 0);
    }
    else if(value is float)
    {
        // Similar code for float
    }

    return false;
}

Can I try to cast the object passed as the function's argument to one numeric data type so I can then compare it to zero rather than checking for each type in my if statement? If the cast fails I would return false. Is there a better(read shorter, more readable) way to do this?

Edit: Some have asked about if I know the type will be a numeric, why the object etc. I hope this makes things clearer.

This function would be part of a Silverlight converter that implements the IValueConverter interface which has a convert signature of

public object Convert(object value, Type targetType, object parameter, System.Globalization.CultureInfo culture)

A first, I only wanted the converter to work with ints but my imagination started to run wild and think what if I have floating point numbers and other numeric types. I wanted to make the converter as flexible as possible. Initially I thought all this extra information would get in the way of what I wanted to do so I didn't include it in my question.

7
  • 5
    Why is this preferable to just using the > operator?
    – Nick
    Mar 10 '10 at 19:32
  • what about casting it as a string the compare it to "0"
    – Luiscencio
    Mar 10 '10 at 19:32
  • @Nick you can't compare an int to an object...
    – Langdon
    Mar 10 '10 at 19:33
  • @Nick because you cant compare object to int using >
    – Jim Counts
    Mar 10 '10 at 19:36
  • But why is he passing an object in the first place? What numeric object does he have that isn't one of the built in types? Using 'object' in a strongly-typed language with generics normally means something smells.
    – Ian Mercer
    Mar 10 '10 at 21:18
17

My preference would be:

public bool IsGreaterThanZero(object value)
{
    if(value is IConvertible)
    {
        return Convert.ToDouble(value) > 0.0;
    }

    return false;
}

This will handle all IConvertible types safely (which includes all floating point and integer types in the framework, but also any custom types).

5
  • Wouldn't this throw an exception if the caller passed in a non-numeric string value? Mar 10 '10 at 19:47
  • @Mike: Potentially- It could be handled, if required, via a try/catch, though. Mar 10 '10 at 19:50
  • @Mike: The OP specified that this would be a numeric value, though - if that's true, the above is fine. If it's not, you'd need exception handling... Mar 10 '10 at 19:52
  • My point is, I would expect throwing and catching an exception to be a far worse performance impact than a string parse. A non-numeric string should be expected as common input to the function (since there is nothing to restrict it or avoid it), then it's not really an exception case that should warrant the performance impact of an exception Mar 10 '10 at 19:53
  • 1
    @Mike: THe performance hit is only significant IF the exception is thrown. A try/catch that isn't triggered has almost no perf. hit. If your standard, real case is to handle this without the exception, this will be much better perf. than converting to a string and back each time (since that happens on all of the good data, too). Mar 10 '10 at 19:57
16

Does the caller know the type? If so, how about:

public static bool GreaterThanZero<T>(T value) where T : struct, IComparable<T>
{
    return value.CompareTo(default(T)) > 0;
}

No conversions needed, and should work for any of the built-in numeric types - and any sensible value types you come up with yourself. (For example, this would be fine with Noda Time's Duration struct.)

Note that the caller doesn't have to know the type directly - it may only know it as another type parameter with the same constraints. Admittedly this may not be appropriate for your situation, but I thought I'd mention it anyway. If nothing knows the type at compile-time (and you don't fancy getting dynamic typing to do the job for you in C# 4!) then calling Convert.ToDouble is probably your best bet - just be aware that it may have problems for System.Numerics.BigInteger from .NET 4.0.

4

Eh? What numeric types do you care about?

public bool IsGreaterThanZero(double value)
{
    return value > 0;
}

These all work ...

    IsGreaterThanZero((int)2);
    IsGreaterThanZero((long)2);
    IsGreaterThanZero((double)2);
    IsGreaterThanZero((float)2);
    IsGreaterThanZero((byte)2);
    IsGreaterThanZero((ulong)2);
3
  • 1
    To me this is the best answer. Type safe (no casting exception), efficient (no conversions or try/catches) and covers all bases.
    – Russell
    Mar 10 '10 at 21:24
  • 1
    @Russel: There will be implicit casts on the call site for everything but a double. Check it out with .Net Reflector. It also doesn't work implicitly for Decimal. Mar 10 '10 at 21:53
  • +1 Hightechrider and +1 Russell: I totally agree with you both. Mar 10 '10 at 21:58
3

You can avoid boxing and unboxing using generics:

Here's the definition of a function

class GenericComparation {
    public static bool IsGreaterThanZero<T>(T value) where T : IComparable<T> {
        // Console.WriteLine(value.GetType().Name)
        return value.CompareTo(default(T)) > 0;
    }
}

Usage:

Console.WriteLine(GenericComparation.IsGreaterThanZero(1));
Console.WriteLine(GenericComparation.IsGreaterThanZero(-1.1));
Console.WriteLine(GenericComparation.IsGreaterThanZero(Decimal.Zero));
2

Try:

double tempValue;
if(double.TryParse(value.ToString(), out tempValue)
{
  return (tempValue > 0)
}
else 
{
  return false;
}
7
  • This is not particularly efficient, since it's going to string, then to double... Mar 10 '10 at 19:39
  • yeah, but I figure the other alternative is to use Convert.ToDouble or something like that, which (A) could throw an exception and (B) I don't really know how efficient that one is either. Anyhow, it would be ideal if .NET had a Covert.TryToDouble that returned a boolean instead of throwing an exception, but that doesn't seem to exist Mar 10 '10 at 19:42
  • @Mike: See my answer - it basically handles that case, without the string conversions... Mar 10 '10 at 19:42
  • @Reed: in your answer, wouldn't the caller be able to pass in a string like "notANumber", have it pass the IConvertable test, and then throw InvalidCastException. As far as efficiency, one of my main concerns is avoiding exceptions based on the input data. Mar 10 '10 at 19:46
  • 1
    Again, wouldn't those Convert functions would throw an exception if the input was a string that couldn't be coverted to an numeric value? Mar 10 '10 at 19:50
1

Why not just Convert.ToDouble or Convert.ToDecimal and then do the comparison? Seems like that would handle most types that someone might pass in.

1

This simplest and fastest way to compare any numeric type To zero is as follows:

public bool IsGreaterThanZero(object value) 
{ 
    if (value != null && value.GetType().IsValueType)
        return System.Convert.ToDouble(value) > 0;
    return false; 
}
1
  • IsValueType doesn't guarantee that the value is numeric. Could be a struct or just plain "object", or an arbitrary string.
    – Adam Lear
    Mar 11 '10 at 3:55

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