I have the following code :

CSS

#container{
    font-size: 0.625em;
}

#div1 {
    width: 200px;
    height: 200px;
    background-color: green;
}

#div2 {
    width: 20em;
    height: 20em;
    background-color: red;
}

HTML

<div id="container">
    <div id="div1">
    This is a test message.This is a test message.This is a test message.This is a test message.
    </div>
    <div id="div2">
        This is a test message.This is a test message.This is a test message.This is a test message.
    </div>
</div>

Chrome Version

Version 35.0.1916.153 m

When you zoom to 50% or smaller in Chrome, the size of the two divs will become different. If your check the font-size in dev tool, your will realize that Chrome automatically increased the font-size of the document.

Can anybody tell me why this happens? And how could I prevent it?

I am doing some research on the difference of em and px, so change the width of #div2 to 200px is not acceptable.

JsFiddle Link

Updated the content and source.

Thank you for your help.

Updated June 16th, 2014

Found something interesting and wanna share with you guys here.

If you had ever touched the "Advanced font settings" in Chrome, or using an default version(not Chinese or Japanese):

  1. you will never be allowed to set font-size to some number smaller than 6px(in Chinese or Japanese version it will be 12px).

  2. 1em will never go smaller than 6px(12px), when you measure something like "height" with "em".

  3. if you set a text to 6px, and zoom to 50%, you may expect to see the text rendered like 3px(become to half). But the text will be set to 12px by chrome, and may break your layout.

Thanks to Dawar Husain. He helps me realize the minimum font size thing.

up vote 2 down vote accepted

See, you used px for the first div and em for the second.

Chrome has a minimum font size and fonts smaller than it will be displayed as that font size only. (see your Chrome Settings)

Now, using div with px, the box goes on and becomes even smaller on zooming at 33% (or 25% or 50%) but using em, the box remains the same size when the minimum font-size has been reached. see

enter image description here

em is useful on browsers which implement zooming by scaling the font size like Chrome. So if you size all your elements using em they scale accordingly. em makes sure that the whole content is displayed as it is even if the size of div changes (on zooming). Hope you got your answer :)

EDIT

In IE10, there's no minimum font size in settings as in GC35. So the em px render like each other.

  • 2
    ems are a really good unit, but can become confusing as they are relative to their parent. I'd recommend considering using rem instead (similar to em but relative to the root) with a px fallback for older browsers: andy-carter.com/blog/using-scalable-css-units-for-font-sizes – drmonkeyninja Jun 13 '14 at 9:09
  • Thank you for your answer. But if you zoom the page to 50% and set the font-size of #div2 to 5px through dev tool, #div2 will become smaller, so I don't think it is the "minimum font size" problem. – Steven Sun Jun 13 '14 at 9:10
  • @drmonkeyninja thank your for the advise. As you can see, I set container to "font-size: 0.625em ", which means 10px. And the two divs are direct children of the container, so their em should be 10px. – Steven Sun Jun 13 '14 at 9:14
  • div2 is not becoming smaller for me (even at 1px font size), although I have same version of Chrome as yours. here:link. And for ems, use this conversion formula - em = desired element pixel value / parent element font-size in pixels – The Pragmatick Jun 13 '14 at 9:28
  • Thank you. After some research on advanced font settings, figured out it is the minimum font-size problem. But it is interesting that I can set font-size to some number smaller than minimum font size, and it works for text but not width with "em". Thank you again. – Steven Sun Jun 13 '14 at 9:34

The divs has different width.

10em is not always equivalent to 100px

try setting the same width (em or px)

An em is equal to the current font-size, for instance, if the font-size of the document is 12pt, 1em is equal to 12pt

One pixel is equal to one dot on the computer screen

refer this page for documentation

your updated fiddle here

body {
            font-size: 0.625em;
        }

        #div1 {
            width: 200px;
            height: 200px;
            background-color: green;
        }

        #div2 {
            width: 200px;
            height: 200px;
            background-color: red;
        }

update

if it doesn't work try with this css property

-webkit-text-size-adjust: none;
  • In this demo, I set font-size of body to 0.625em, which equals to 10px, so 10em will be 100px. I want to know what will happen to 'px' and 'em', during zoom-in and zoom-out, so I create this demo. – Steven Sun Jun 13 '14 at 8:31
  • If you set it to 0 the fonts are invisible!! – faby Jun 13 '14 at 8:34
  • Is there any problem with my answer? Doesn't it solve your question? – faby Jun 13 '14 at 8:41
  • update my answer.. try now – faby Jun 13 '14 at 8:56
  • I set the width of div2 to 20em on purpose. And in this demo em should be 10px. I want to know what chrome has done when I zoom-in and zoom-out, and why chrome do that. So I cann't accept your answer, sorry. – Steven Sun Jun 13 '14 at 8:57

Your Answer

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.