518

I am looking for a way to replace characters in a Swift String.

Example: "This is my string"

I would like to replace " " with "+" to get "This+is+my+string".

How can I achieve this?

1

22 Answers 22

993

This answer has been updated for Swift 4 & 5. If you're still using Swift 1, 2 or 3 see the revision history.

You have a couple of options. You can do as @jaumard suggested and use replacingOccurrences()

let aString = "This is my string"
let newString = aString.replacingOccurrences(of: " ", with: "+", options: .literal, range: nil)

And as noted by @cprcrack below, the options and range parameters are optional, so if you don't want to specify string comparison options or a range to do the replacement within, you only need the following.

let aString = "This is my string"
let newString = aString.replacingOccurrences(of: " ", with: "+")

Or, if the data is in a specific format like this, where you're just replacing separation characters, you can use components() to break the string into and array, and then you can use the join() function to put them back to together with a specified separator.

let toArray = aString.components(separatedBy: " ")
let backToString = toArray.joined(separator: "+")

Or if you're looking for a more Swifty solution that doesn't utilize API from NSString, you could use this.

let aString = "Some search text"

let replaced = String(aString.map {
    $0 == " " ? "+" : $0
})
9
  • 10
    options and range parameters are optional
    – cprcrack
    Jan 15 '15 at 16:16
  • 1
    great swift2 replacement for stringByReplacingOccurrencesOfString
    – rjb101
    Aug 21 '15 at 4:40
  • I don't know if I'm doing something wrong but the second swift 2.0 solution leaves me with and optional string. Original String looks like this: "x86_64" and the new mapping looks like "Optional([\"x\", \"8\", \"6\", \"_\", \"6\", \"4\"])" Oct 19 '15 at 15:07
  • 7
    For anyone who had issues with using stringByReplacingOccurrencesOfString in Swift 2, you need to import Foundation to be able to use that method. Nov 8 '15 at 3:40
  • 1
    wow, stringByReplacingOccurrencesOfString, how intuitive! I was expecting something like makeNewStringByReplacingOccurrencesOfFirstArgumentByValueInSecondArgument Mar 17 '16 at 16:10
68

You can use this:

let s = "This is my string"
let modified = s.replace(" ", withString:"+")    

If you add this extension method anywhere in your code:

extension String
{
    func replace(target: String, withString: String) -> String
    {
       return self.stringByReplacingOccurrencesOfString(target, withString: withString, options: NSStringCompareOptions.LiteralSearch, range: nil)
    }
}

Swift 3:

extension String
{
    func replace(target: String, withString: String) -> String
    {
        return self.replacingOccurrences(of: target, with: withString, options: NSString.CompareOptions.literal, range: nil)
    }
}
1
  • 2
    I would not name the function "replace" as this suggest it mutates the variable. Use same grammar as Apple do. Calling it "replacing(_:withString:)" makes it much more clear. A future mutating "replace" function would also conflict in naming.
    – Sunkas
    Apr 24 '19 at 12:44
65

Swift 3, Swift 4, Swift 5 Solution

let exampleString = "Example string"

//Solution suggested above in Swift 3.0
let stringToArray = exampleString.components(separatedBy: " ")
let stringFromArray = stringToArray.joined(separator: "+")

//Swiftiest solution
let swiftyString = exampleString.replacingOccurrences(of: " ", with: "+")
0
21

Did you test this :

var test = "This is my string"

let replaced = test.stringByReplacingOccurrencesOfString(" ", withString: "+", options: nil, range: nil)
0
14

Swift 4:

let abc = "Hello world"

let result = abc.replacingOccurrences(of: " ", with: "_", 
    options: NSString.CompareOptions.literal, range:nil)

print(result :\(result))

Output:

result : Hello_world
10

I am using this extension:

extension String {

    func replaceCharacters(characters: String, toSeparator: String) -> String {
        let characterSet = NSCharacterSet(charactersInString: characters)
        let components = self.componentsSeparatedByCharactersInSet(characterSet)
        let result = components.joinWithSeparator("")
        return result
    }

    func wipeCharacters(characters: String) -> String {
        return self.replaceCharacters(characters, toSeparator: "")
    }
}

Usage:

let token = "<34353 43434>"
token.replaceCharacters("< >", toString:"+")
0
8

A Swift 3 solution along the lines of Sunkas's:

extension String {
    mutating func replace(_ originalString:String, with newString:String) {
        self = self.replacingOccurrences(of: originalString, with: newString)
    }
}

Use:

var string = "foo!"
string.replace("!", with: "?")
print(string)

Output:

foo?
7

A category that modifies an existing mutable String:

extension String
{
    mutating func replace(originalString:String, withString newString:String)
    {
        let replacedString = self.stringByReplacingOccurrencesOfString(originalString, withString: newString, options: nil, range: nil)
        self = replacedString
    }
}

Use:

name.replace(" ", withString: "+")
5

Swift 3 solution based on Ramis' answer:

extension String {
    func withReplacedCharacters(_ characters: String, by separator: String) -> String {
        let characterSet = CharacterSet(charactersIn: characters)
        return components(separatedBy: characterSet).joined(separator: separator)
    }
}

Tried to come up with an appropriate function name according to Swift 3 naming convention.

1
  • This is my preferred solution, as it lets you replace multiple characters at once. Apr 26 '17 at 13:52
5

Less happened to me, I just want to change (a word or character) in the String

So I've use the Dictionary

  extension String{
    func replace(_ dictionary: [String: String]) -> String{
          var result = String()
          var i = -1
          for (of , with): (String, String)in dictionary{
              i += 1
              if i<1{
                  result = self.replacingOccurrences(of: of, with: with)
              }else{
                  result = result.replacingOccurrences(of: of, with: with)
              }
          }
        return result
     }
    }

usage

let mobile = "+1 (800) 444-9999"
let dictionary = ["+": "00", " ": "", "(": "", ")": "", "-": ""]
let mobileResult = mobile.replace(dictionary)
print(mobileResult) // 001800444999
2
  • Good solution! Thanks
    – Dasoga
    Sep 26 '19 at 16:41
  • swift goes out of its way to use different terminology for almost everything. almost any other languages it's just replace May 27 '20 at 21:05
5
var str = "This is my string"

print(str.replacingOccurrences(of: " ", with: "+"))

Output is

This+is+my+string
0
3
var str = "This is my string"
str = str.replacingOccurrences(of: " ", with: "+")
print(str)
2
  • why can I not find replacingOccurrences in String ? May 27 '20 at 21:08
  • Mack sure your variable type is String Oct 20 '20 at 5:32
2

Xcode 11 • Swift 5.1

The mutating method of StringProtocol replacingOccurrences can be implemented as follow:

extension RangeReplaceableCollection where Self: StringProtocol {
    mutating func replaceOccurrences<Target: StringProtocol, Replacement: StringProtocol>(of target: Target, with replacement: Replacement, options: String.CompareOptions = [], range searchRange: Range<String.Index>? = nil) {
        self = .init(replacingOccurrences(of: target, with: replacement, options: options, range: searchRange))
    }
}

var name = "This is my string"
name.replaceOccurrences(of: " ", with: "+")
print(name) // "This+is+my+string\n"
1
  • 1
    This is a great little tidbit. Thanks Leo! Nov 19 '19 at 10:20
1

I think Regex is the most flexible and solid way:

var str = "This is my string"
let regex = try! NSRegularExpression(pattern: " ", options: [])
let output = regex.stringByReplacingMatchesInString(
    str,
    options: [],
    range: NSRange(location: 0, length: str.characters.count),
    withTemplate: "+"
)
// output: "This+is+my+string"
1

Swift extension:

extension String {

    func stringByReplacing(replaceStrings set: [String], with: String) -> String {
        var stringObject = self
        for string in set {
            stringObject = self.stringByReplacingOccurrencesOfString(string, withString: with)
        }
        return stringObject
    }

}

Go on and use it like let replacedString = yorString.stringByReplacing(replaceStrings: [" ","?","."], with: "+")

The speed of the function is something that i can hardly be proud of, but you can pass an array of String in one pass to make more than one replacement.

1

Here is the example for Swift 3:

var stringToReplace = "This my string"
if let range = stringToReplace.range(of: "my") {
   stringToReplace?.replaceSubrange(range, with: "your")
} 
1

This is easy in swift 4.2. just use replacingOccurrences(of: " ", with: "_") for replace

var myStr = "This is my string"
let replaced = myStr.replacingOccurrences(of: " ", with: "_")
print(replaced)
0

If you don't want to use the Objective-C NSString methods, you can just use split and join:

var string = "This is my string"
string = join("+", split(string, isSeparator: { $0 == " " }))

split(string, isSeparator: { $0 == " " }) returns an array of strings (["This", "is", "my", "string"]).

join joins these elements with a +, resulting in the desired output: "This+is+my+string".

0

I've implemented this very simple func:

func convap (text : String) -> String {
    return text.stringByReplacingOccurrencesOfString("'", withString: "''")
}

So you can write:

let sqlQuery = "INSERT INTO myTable (Field1, Field2) VALUES ('\(convap(value1))','\(convap(value2)')
0

you can test this:

let newString = test.stringByReplacingOccurrencesOfString(" ", withString: "+", options: nil, range: nil)

0

Since Swift 2, String does no longer conform to SequenceType. In other words, you can not iterate through a string with a for...in loop.

The simple and easy way is to convert String to Array to get the benefit of the index just like that:

let input = Array(str)

I remember when I tried to index into String without using any conversion. I was really frustrated that I couldn’t come up with or reach a desired result, and was about to give up. But I ended up creating my own workaround solution, and here is the full code of the extension:

extension String {
    subscript (_ index: Int) -> String {
    
        get {
             String(self[self.index(startIndex, offsetBy: index)])
        }
    
        set {
            remove(at: self.index(self.startIndex, offsetBy: index))
            insert(Character(newValue), at: self.index(self.startIndex, offsetBy: index))
        }
    }
}

Now that you can read and replace a single character from string using its index just like you originally wanted to:

var str = "cat"
for i in 0..<str.count {
 if str[i] == "c" {
   str[i] = "h"
 }
}

print(str)

It’s simple and useful way to use it and get through Swift’s String access model. Now that you’ll feel it’s smooth sailing next time when you can loop through the string just as it is, not casting it into Array.

Try it out, and see if it can help!

-1

Here's an extension for an in-place occurrences replace method on String, that doesn't no an unnecessary copy and do everything in place:

extension String {
    mutating func replaceOccurrences<Target: StringProtocol, Replacement: StringProtocol>(of target: Target, with replacement: Replacement, options: String.CompareOptions = [], locale: Locale? = nil) {
        var range: Range<Index>?
        repeat {
            range = self.range(of: target, options: options, range: range.map { self.index($0.lowerBound, offsetBy: replacement.count)..<self.endIndex }, locale: locale)
            if let range = range {
                self.replaceSubrange(range, with: replacement)
            }
        } while range != nil
    }
}

(The method signature also mimics the signature of the built-in String.replacingOccurrences() method)

May be used in the following way:

var string = "this is a string"
string.replaceOccurrences(of: " ", with: "_")
print(string) // "this_is_a_string"
1
  • I've updated the code to prevent infinite loops if the contained text was contained in the target text. Jan 28 '19 at 14:18

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