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I try to evalaute the performance of numpy linked to ATLAS compared to numpy linked to OpenBLAS. I get some strange results for ATLAS which I describe below.

The Python code for evaluating matrix-matrix multiplication (aka sgemm) looks like this:

import sys
sys.path.insert(0, "numpy-1.8.1")

import numpy
import timeit

for i in range(100, 501, 100):
    setup = "import numpy; m1 = numpy.random.rand(%d, %d).astype(numpy.float32)" % (i, i)
    timer = timeit.Timer("numpy.dot(m1, m1)", setup)
    times = timer.repeat(100, 1)
    print "%3d" % i,
    print "%7.4f" % numpy.mean(times),
    print "%7.4f" % numpy.min(times),
    print "%7.4f" % numpy.max(times)

If I run this script with numpy linked to ATLAS I get large variations in the measured time. You see the matrix size in the frist column, followed by mean, min and max of execution times gained by running the matrix matrix multiplication 100 fold:

100  0.0003  0.0003  0.0004
200  0.0023  0.0010  0.0073
300  0.0052  0.0026  0.0178
400  0.0148  0.0066  0.0283
500  0.0295  0.0169  0.0531

If I repeat this procedure with numpy linked to OpenBLAS using one thread the running times are much more stable:

100  0.0002  0.0002  0.0003
200  0.0014  0.0014  0.0015
300  0.0044  0.0044  0.0047
400  0.0102  0.0101  0.0105
500  0.0169  0.0168  0.0177

Can anybody explane this observation ?

Edit: Additional information:

The oberved min and max values for ATLAS are no outliers, the times are distributed over the given range.

I uploaded ATALS times for i=500 at https://gist.github.com/uweschmitt/768bd165477d7c14095e

The given times come from a different run, so avg, min and max values differ slightly.

Edit: Additional finding:

May CPU Throttling (http://www.scipy.org/scipylib/building/linux.html#step-1-disable-cpu-throttling) be the cause ? I do not know enough about CPU throtting in order to judge its impact on my measurements. Regrettably I can not set / unset it on my target machine.

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  • I run this script in two different folders containing a different built of numpy. Do you mean, you get other timings in respect of their magnitude, or in respect of the distribution ? – rocksportrocker Jun 13 '14 at 9:30
  • The linked file is fine, thanks. – Veedrac Jun 13 '14 at 9:35
  • What happens if you put numpy.random.seed(0) in setup before the rand call? – Veedrac Jun 13 '14 at 9:38
  • This does not change the observed deviations. – rocksportrocker Jun 13 '14 at 10:36
  • can you try with much larger sizes too, just to see if the difference stays? – usethedeathstar Jun 13 '14 at 13:03
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+50

I cannot reproduce, but I think I know the reason. I am using Numpy 1.8.1 on a Linux 64 box.

First, my results with ATLAS (I have added the standard deviation in the last column):

100  0.0003  0.0002  0.0025  0.0003
200  0.0012  0.0010  0.0067  0.0006
300  0.0028  0.0026  0.0047  0.0004
400  0.0070  0.0059  0.0089  0.0004
500  0.0122  0.0109  0.0149  0.0009

And now, the results with MKL provided by Anaconda:

100  0.0003  0.0001  0.0155  0.0015
200  0.0005  0.0005  0.0006  0.0000
300  0.0018  0.0017  0.0021  0.0001
400  0.0039  0.0038  0.0042  0.0001
500  0.0079  0.0077  0.0084  0.0002

MKL is faster, but the spread is consistent.

ATLAS is tuned at compile time, it will try different configurations and algorithms and keep the fastest for your particular set of hardware. If you install a precompiled version, you are using the optimal configuration for the building machine, not for yours. This misconfiguration is the probable cause of the spread. In my case, I have compiled ATLAS myself.

On the contrary, OpenBLAS is hand tuned to the specific architecture, so any binary install will be equivalent. MKL decides dynamically.

This is what happens if I run the script on Numpy installed from the repositories and linked with a pre-compiled ATLAS (SSE3 not activated):

100  0.0007  0.0003  0.0064  0.0007
200  0.0021  0.0015  0.0090  0.0009
300  0.0050  0.0040  0.0114  0.0010
400  0.0113  0.0101  0.0186  0.0011
500  0.0217  0.0192  0.0329  0.0020

These numbers are more similar to your data.

For completeness, I aksed a friend to run the snippet on her machine, that has numpy installed from Ubuntu repositories and no ATLAS, so Numpy is falling back to its crappy default:

100  0.0007  0.0007  0.0008  0.0000
200  0.0058  0.0053  0.0107  0.0014
300  0.0178  0.0175  0.0188  0.0003
400  0.0418  0.0401  0.0528  0.0014
500  0.0803  0.0797  0.0818  0.0004

So, what may be happening?

You have a non optimal installation of ATLAS, and that is why you get such a scatter. My numbers were run on a Intel i5 CPU @ 1.7 GHz on a laptop. I don't know which machine you have, but I doubt it is almost three times slower than mine. This suggest ATLAS is not fully optimised.

How can I be sure?

Running numpy.show_config() will tell you which libraries it is linked to, and where they are. The output is something like this:

atlas_threads_info:
    libraries = ['lapack', 'ptf77blas', 'ptcblas', 'atlas']
    library_dirs = ['/usr/lib64/atlas-sse3']
    define_macros = [('ATLAS_INFO', '"\\"3.8.4\\""')]
    language = f77
    include_dirs = ['/usr/include']
blas_opt_info:

If this is true, how to fix it?

You may have a stale precompiled binary atlas (it is a dependency for some packages), or the flags you used to compile it are wrong. The smoothest solution is to build the RMPS from source. Here are instructions for CentOS.

Note that OpenBLAS is not compatible (yet) with multiprocessing, so be aware of the limitations. If you are very heavy on linear algebra, MKL is the best option, but it is expensive. Academics can get it for free from Continuum Anaconda Python distribution, and many universities have a campus-wide licence.

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  • I have to say that I used as self compiled ATLAS for the tests. – rocksportrocker Jun 20 '14 at 8:49
  • @rocksportrocker what OS? How was it built? – Davidmh Jun 20 '14 at 14:09
  • I am puzzled, then. I cannot replicate on a Fedora box. Could it be the CPU is not so well suited for ATLAS? I have an i5. Another possibility is that some compilation flags are incorrect, I built it from the RPM from the official repository. – Davidmh Jun 21 '14 at 12:03
  • @rocksportrocker I have added some new data and my interpretation. – Davidmh Jun 23 '14 at 1:32

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