9

I have the following code inside a function

Myfunc<- function(directory, MyFiles, id = 1:332) {
# uncomment the 3 lines below for testing
#directory<-"local"
#id=c(2, 4)
#MyFiles<-c(f2.csv,f4.csv)
idd<-id

df2 <- data.frame()

for(i in 1:length(idd)) {
  EmptyVector <- read.csv(MyFiles[i])  
  comp_cases[i]<-sum(complete.cases(EmptyVector))
  print(comp_cases[[i]])
  id=idd[i]
  ret2=comp_cases[[i]]
  df2<-rbind(df2,data.frame(id,ret2))
 }
print(df2)
return(df2)
}

This works when I try to run it in R by selecting the code inside the function and commenting out the return. I get a nice data frame like from the print statement:

> df2
 id ret2
1 2  994
2 4  7112

However, when I try to return the dataframe df2 from the function it only returns the 1st row, ignoring all other values. My problem is that it works within the function for various values I have tried (opening multiple files with various combinations) and not when I try to return the data frame. Can someone help please. Thanks a lot in advance.

  • 1
    How are you calling your function? – MrFlick Jun 13 '14 at 19:46
7

If I understand you correctly, you are trying to create a dataframe with the number of complete cases for each id. Supposing your files are names with the id-numbers like you specified (e.g. f2.csv), you can simplify your function as follows:

myfunc <- function(directory, id = 1:332) {
  y <- vector()
  for(i in 1:length(id)){
    x <- id
    y <- c(y, sum(complete.cases(
      read.csv(as.character(paste0(directory,"/","f",id[i],".csv"))))))
  }
  df <- data.frame(x, y)
  colnames(df) <- c("id","ret2")
  return(df)
}

You can call this function like this:

myfunc("name-of-your-directory",25:87)

An explanation of the above code. You have to break down your problem into steps:

  1. You need a vector of the id's, that's done by x <- id
  2. For each id you want the number of complete cases. In order to get that, you have to read the file first. That's done by read.csv(as.character(paste0(directory,"/","f",id[i],".csv"))). To get the number of complete cases for that file, you have to wrap the read.csv code inside sum and complete.cases.
  3. Now you want to add that number to a vector. Therefore you need an empty vector (y <- vector()) to which you can add the number of complete cases from step 2. That's done by wrapping the code from step 2 inside y <- c(y, "code step 2"). With this you add the number of complete cases for each id to the vector y.
  4. The final step is to combine these two vectors into a dataframe with df <- data.frame(x, y) and assign some meaningfull colnames.

By including the steps 1, 2 and 3 (except the y <- vector() part) in a for-loop, you can iterate over the list of specified id's. Creating the empty vector with y <- vector() has to be done before the for-loop, so that the for-loop can add values to y.

  • @Japp - This worked great. The code is much more cleaner. Yes, I was trying to return a dataframe of complete cases with ID. If you tell me where I was going wrong, it would still help. – user3127034 Jun 14 '14 at 2:46
  • @user3127034 - The main part where you went wrong is by including the Myfiles parameter in your function. It wasn't needed as your filenames have all the same structure and can be derived from the id's. I added an explanation. I hope that helps. – Jaap Jun 14 '14 at 7:30
1

This one is actually pretty easy to get around by changing scope.

The issue is that you're creating the initial dataframe as a local variable initially, then you're just swapping out the rows, so you'll wind up with only the first and last results in the dataframe.

When I create a for loop with R and want to add the results of successive queries etc. to some initial dataframe, I do this:

function(<some_args>){ 
main_dataframe <<- do something to generate the first set of results from 
whatever you want to iterate, like 1:10, a given list, etc. and create the 
initial dataframe from the first iteration and use the global assignment 
('<<-'), not '<-' or '='

main_dataframe <<- do_something(whatever_you're_iterating_over[1])

for (i in 2:length(whatever_you're_iterating_over)) {
next_dataframe = do_something(whatever_you're_iterating_over[i])

main_dataframe <<- rbind(main_dataframe, next_dataframe)
    }
}

The scoping will allow each iteration to create a dataframe that you can append to the original without losing any of the iterations in between the first and the last.

  • thanks for mentioning the <<- global assignment operator. It was helpful in my context – Ashish Jul 2 '18 at 5:48
0

Two answers to this question have been posted and neither worked for my particular situation. For some reason, returning a data frame just doesn't seem an option for my simulation. This work-around initiates the main data frame - (using the terminology in the unevencodebro's helpful response - before the function block.

Shown below are two versions. The first identifies the main data frame outside the function and it works fine. The next block shows the main data frame identified inside the function and it only returns the last row:

         "tag" = as.character("tag"), stringsAsFactors = FALSE)
main_dataframe <- main_dataframe[-1, ]

try_this <- function(a = 10) {
  # first loop
  for(j in 1:10) {
      x.s <- runif(1, 0, a)
      y.s <- runif(1, 0, a)
      new_dataframe <- data.frame("x" = x.s, "y" = y.s, "tag" = "A")
      main_dataframe <<- rbind(main_dataframe, new_dataframe)
  }
}

try_this()

Below is the version that does not work. The data frame at the end only includes the last data point.

try_that <- function(a = 10) {

  main_dataframe <<- data.frame("x" = 0, "y" = 0,  
            "tag" = as.character("tag"), stringsAsFactors = FALSE)
  main_dataframe <- main_dataframe[-1, ]
  # first loop
  for(j in 1:10) {
      x.s <- runif(1, 0, a)
      y.s <- runif(1, 0, a)
      new_dataframe <- data.frame("x" = x.s, "y" = y.s, "tag" = "A")
      main_dataframe <<- rbind(main_dataframe, new_dataframe)
  }
}

try_that()

Note that the global assignment <<- is still necessary where used.

So, although try_that() didn't work, here is a version that effectively resets the main data frame with a reset function:

reset_main <- function() {
main_dataframe <<- data.frame("x" = 0, "y" = 0,  
          "tag" = as.character("tag"), stringsAsFactors = FALSE)
main_dataframe <<- main_dataframe[-1, ]
}

try_again <- function(a = 10) {
  reset_main()
  # first loop
  for(j in 1:10) {
      x.s <- runif(1, 0, a)
      y.s <- runif(1, 0, a)
      new_dataframe <- data.frame("x" = x.s, "y" = y.s, "tag" = "A")
      main_dataframe <<- rbind(main_dataframe, new_dataframe)
  }
}

try_again()

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