28

How do I stop a block enumeration?

    myArray.enumerateObjectsUsingBlock( { object, index, stop in
        //how do I stop the enumeration in here??
    })

I know in obj-c you do this:

    [myArray enumerateObjectsUsingBlock:^(id *myObject, NSUInteger idx, BOOL *stop) {
        *stop = YES;
    }];
  • possible duplicate of enumerateObjectsUsingBlock in Swift – David Berry Jun 13 '14 at 21:51
  • The link basically says, don't use enumerateObjectsUsingBlock in swift, because the functionality is better expressed using for ... in.. enumerate – David Berry Jun 13 '14 at 21:52
  • 4
    @David: not a duplicate. the other thread does not cover the stop parameter. – vikingosegundo Jun 13 '14 at 21:53
  • Yeah it does, the answer deals with how to replace this older call with the newer syntax and how to stop it early as well. – David Berry Jun 13 '14 at 21:58
  • 3
    if we are asked to give an answer regarding a specific api, It might be helpful to give an alternate option but technically it is not an answer. only one opinion. If you are ask in a math exam to calculate some function with Taylor but you use Fourier, because ou think it is better for what reason ever, it is complete failure. if OP needs/wants to use enumerateObjectsUsingBlock, we shouldn't force him to use something else. though we should mention a better way. – vikingosegundo Jun 13 '14 at 22:07
21

In Swift 1:

stop.withUnsafePointer { p in p.memory = true }

In Swift 2:

stop.memory = true

In Swift 3 - 4:

stop.pointee = true
  • Holy FSM, why is that so difficult to do? I guess because your not suppose to use enumerateObjectsUsingBlock but for crap – random Jun 13 '14 at 21:54
  • 2
    Because they are bridging some of the horrible stuff from Objective-C into Swift – hypercrypt Jun 13 '14 at 21:55
  • Because Apple now recommends using for (index, value) in array.enumerate() instead, which eliminates the block and the stop entirely, while duplicating exactly the same functionality much more clearly. – David Berry Jun 13 '14 at 21:57
  • @random. if you can you should use Array, not NSArray and the for obj in myArray-Syntax. – vikingosegundo Jun 13 '14 at 21:57
  • @david: enumerate is a global function, not a method on array. it is called enumerate(array) – vikingosegundo Jun 14 '14 at 0:27
33

This has unfortunately changed every major version of Swift. Here's a breakdown:

Swift 1

stop.withUnsafePointer { p in p.memory = true }

Swift 2

stop.memory = true

Swift 3

stop.pointee = true
  • 6
    lol swift 4: stop.pointeee = true – random Aug 30 '16 at 20:29
20

since XCode6 Beta4, the following way can be used instead:

let array: NSArray = // the array with some elements...

array.enumerateObjectsUsingBlock( { (object: AnyObject!, idx: Int, stop: UnsafePointer<ObjCBool>) -> Void in

        // do something with the current element...

        var shouldStop: ObjCBool = // true or false ...
        stop.initialize(shouldStop)

        })
  • 4
    I was about to post an answer that noted that stop[0] = true worked, but I think I like stop.initialize(true) more. The lack of clear guidance on this topic (for a pattern that is used a lot) is a tad frustrating. – Rob Aug 1 '14 at 15:27
6

The accepted answer is correct but will work for NSArrays only. Not for the Swift datatype Array. If you like you can recreate it with an extension.

extension Array{
    func enumerateObjectsUsingBlock(enumerator:(obj:Any, idx:Int, inout stop:Bool)->Void){
        for (i,v) in enumerate(self){
            var stop:Bool = false
            enumerator(obj: v, idx: i,  stop: &stop)
            if stop{
                break
            }
        }
    }
}

call it like

[1,2,3,4,5].enumerateObjectsUsingBlock({
    obj, idx, stop in

    let x = (obj as Int) * (obj as Int)
    println("\(x)")

    if obj as Int == 3{
        stop = true
    }
})

or for function with a block as the last parameter you can do

[1,2,3,4,5].enumerateObjectsUsingBlock(){
    obj, idx, stop in

    let x = (obj as Int) * (obj as Int)
    println("\(x)")

    if obj as Int == 3{
        stop = true
    }
}
  • stop = true doesn't work in beta 3 FYI – nsdebug Jul 14 '14 at 11:45
  • 1
    it does on my machine. with beta 3. – vikingosegundo Jul 15 '14 at 20:19
  • why does this upvoted if it doesn't work? – Vyachaslav Gerchicov Jun 19 '18 at 12:40
  • @VyachaslavGerchicov I guess your question is: "Why has this been upvoted if it doesn't work". Well, it did 4 years ago. Swift has been undergoing several incompatible changes. Fell free to fix it. – vikingosegundo Jun 19 '18 at 12:58
  • @vikingosegundo Cannot assign to value: 'stop' is a 'let' constant. The simplest solution I found is stop.initialize(to: true). Do you know a better one which works? – Vyachaslav Gerchicov Jun 19 '18 at 13:18
-3

Just stop = true

Since stop is declared as inout, swift will take care of mapping the indirection for you.

  • 6
    Cannot assign 'let' value 'stop' – random Jun 13 '14 at 21:41
  • This information is outdated – ctietze Nov 24 '14 at 10:57
  • Use stop.memory = true – Sam Soffes Jan 5 '16 at 18:56

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