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Having 32 bits stored in a uint32_t in memory, what's the fastest way to unpack each bit to a separate byte element of an AVX register? The bits can be in any position within their respective byte.

Edit: to clarify, I mean bit 0 goes to byte 0, bit 1 to byte 1. Obviously all other bits within the byte on zero. Best I could at the moment is 2 PSHUFB and having a mask register for each position.

If the uint32_t is a bitmap, then the corresponding vector elements should be 0 or non-0. (i.e. so we could get a vector mask with a vpcmpeqb against a vector of all-zero).

https://software.intel.com/en-us/forums/topic/283382

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  • What language are you using? Is there some approach that you have tried that is too slow? – John Gietzen Jun 15 '14 at 2:10
  • C with Intel intrinsics. I tried the obvious approaches: broadcast the u32, then either variable shift or multiplication to shift each u32. But it starts to get complicated and would need several registers for mask. Then merge. I think I saw something similar a couple of years ago, in some assembly for video codecs or something. – alecco Jun 15 '14 at 2:15
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    Broadast first. With AVX2 then use _mm256_and_si256. With AVX you need to split the lanes, do _mm_and_si128 twice, then join high and low. – Z boson Jun 15 '14 at 11:26
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    @alecco, I posted an answer to do this with AVX. It would be a bit simpler with AVX2. – Z boson Jun 16 '14 at 11:31
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    AVX512BW: VPMOVM2B ymm1, k1: sets each byte of ymm1 to 0 or -1, according to the corresponding bit in k1. If the mask wasn't already in a mask register, then you also need a KMOVD k1, k2/m32 or KMOVD k1, r32. Obviously you can do this with 64bit masks into 512b zmm registers, too. – Peter Cordes Feb 25 '16 at 1:55
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To "broadcast" the 32 bits of a 32-bit integer x to 32 bytes of a 256-bit YMM register z or 16 bytes of a two 128-bit XMM registers z_low and z_high you can do the following.

With AVX2:

__m256i y = _mm256_set1_epi32(x);
__m256i z = _mm256_shuffle_epi8(y,mask1);
z = _mm256_and_si256(z,mask2);

Without AVX2 it's best to do this with SSE:

__m128i y = _mm_set1_epi32(x);      
__m128i z_low  = _mm_shuffle_epi8(y,mask_low);
__m128i z_high = _mm_shuffle_epi8(y,mask_high); 
z_low  = _mm_and_si128(z_low ,mask2);
z_high = _mm_and_si128(z_high,mask2);

The masks and a working example are shown below. If you plan to do this several times you should probably define the masks outside of the main loop.

#include <immintrin.h>
#include <stdio.h>

int main() {
    int x = 0x87654321;

    static const char mask1a[32] = {
        0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00,
        0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00,
        0x01, 0x01, 0x01, 0x01,
        0x01, 0x01, 0x01, 0x01,
        0x02, 0x02, 0x02, 0x02,
        0x02, 0x02, 0x02, 0x02,
        0x03, 0x03, 0x03, 0x03,
        0x03, 0x03, 0x03, 0x03
    };

    static const char mask2a[32] = {
        0x01, 0x02, 0x04, 0x08,
        0x10, 0x20, 0x40, 0x80,
        0x01, 0x02, 0x04, 0x08,
        0x10, 0x20, 0x40, 0x80,
        0x01, 0x02, 0x04, 0x08,
        0x10, 0x20, 0x40, 0x80,
        0x01, 0x02, 0x04, 0x08,
        0x10, 0x20, 0x40, 0x80,
    };

char out[32];

#if defined ( __AVX2__ )
    __m256i mask2 = _mm256_loadu_si256((__m256i*)mask2a);
    __m256i mask1  = _mm256_loadu_si256((__m256i*)mask1a);

    __m256i y =    _mm256_set1_epi32(x);
    __m256i z =    _mm256_shuffle_epi8(y,mask1);
    z = _mm256_and_si256(z,mask2);

    _mm256_storeu_si256((__m256i*)out,z);

#else
    __m128i mask2 = _mm_loadu_si128((__m128i*)mask2a);
    __m128i mask_low  = _mm_loadu_si128((__m128i*)&mask1a[ 0]);
    __m128i mask_high = _mm_loadu_si128((__m128i*)&mask1a[16]);    

    __m128i y = _mm_set1_epi32(x); 
    __m128i z_low  = _mm_shuffle_epi8(y,mask_low);
    __m128i z_high = _mm_shuffle_epi8(y,mask_high);
    z_low  = _mm_and_si128(z_low,mask2);
    z_high = _mm_and_si128(z_high,mask2);

    _mm_storeu_si128((__m128i*)&out[ 0],z_low);
    _mm_storeu_si128((__m128i*)&out[16],z_high);
#endif
    for(int i=0; i<8; i++) {
        for(int j=0; j<4; j++) {        
            printf("%x ", out[4*i+j]);
        }printf("\n");
    } printf("\n");
}

To get 0 or -1 in each vector element:

It takes one extra step _mm256_cmpeq_epi8 against all-zeros. Any non-zero turns into 0, and zero turns into -1. If we don't want this inversion, use andnot instead of and. It inverts its first operand.

__m256i expand_bits_to_bytes(uint32_t x)
{
    __m256i xbcast = _mm256_set1_epi32(x);    // we only use the low 32bits of each lane, but this is fine with AVX2

    // Each byte gets the source byte containing the corresponding bit
    __m256i shufmask = _mm256_set_epi64x(
        0x0303030303030303, 0x0202020202020202,
        0x0101010101010101, 0x0000000000000000);
    __m256i shuf  = _mm256_shuffle_epi8(xbcast, shufmask);

    __m256i andmask  = _mm256_set1_epi64x(0x8040201008040201);  // every 8 bits -> 8 bytes, pattern repeats.
    __m256i isolated_inverted = _mm256_andnot_si256(shuf, andmask);

    // this is the extra step: compare each byte == 0 to produce 0 or -1
    return _mm256_cmpeq_epi8(isolated_inverted, _mm256_setzero_si256());
     // alternative: compare against the AND mask to get 0 or -1,
     // avoiding the need for a vector zero constant.
}

See it on the Godbolt Compiler Explorer.

Also see is there an inverse instruction to the movemask instruction in intel avx2? for other element sizes.

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    @alecco, I updated my answer showing how to do this with AVX2. I tested it as well. – Z boson Jun 17 '14 at 9:25
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    You're a star! Thanks a lot. Wish I could give you more upvotes. – alecco Jun 17 '14 at 14:00
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    If you want the resulting bytes to be 0 or -1 (so each bit of the mask expands to all bits of the vector byte), you need one more step. After the shuffle, use andn instead of and (inverting y). Then use a _mm256_cmpeq_epi8 against a vector of all-zeros to invert again. – Peter Cordes May 26 '16 at 22:44
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    Also, I'd write mask2a as _mm256_set1_epi64x(0x80'40'20'10'08'04'02'01). (The C++14 ' separators for readability are totally optional.) To make it easy to select 128 vs. 256, you can use a _mm_set1_epi64x() and then the AVX2 version can use _mm256_set_m128i(same,same). It all optimizes away at compile time. – Peter Cordes May 26 '16 at 22:58
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    There's a duplicate of this that has the same the strategy. (Also suggesting an OR with a mask that has one bit unset and vpcmpeqb against set1(0xFF), but an all-zeros vector is slightly cheaper to than all-ones) Not sure if I should close it. I was looking for a non-AVX version to link. I guess this has a non-AVX2 version at least. – Peter Cordes Nov 19 '17 at 6:30

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