6

Let's say we've got an class 'A' that acts as a context manager in it's own right, so it implements the

def __enter__()
def __exit__()

interface. It's valid for client code to make 'A' objects directly using a with statement.

Now, we've also got another class 'B' that encapsulates other functionality, as well makes use of an 'A' object.

If we'd like to have 'B' act as a context manager as well, what's the right way of managing it's 'A' instance?

Should the implementation of __enter__ and __exit__ on 'B' call __enter__ and __exit__ (respectively) on it's A-object instance? Or is there a better way?

To give a concrete example (this is not what I'm using in my application, it's just the first non-abstract example that came to mind) consider two classes

  • DatabaseConnection
  • DatabaseConnectionPool

It's valid to use a single DatabaseConnection on it's own, thus DatabaseConnection implements the context-manager interface.

DatabaseConnectionPool makes use of several DatabaseConnections as well as other bits and bobs. Using DatabaseConnectionPool (i.e. "with") should do the set up and tear-down on it's DatabaseConnection instances (along with whatever else it might want to do)

Update: I've written some test code which I was hoping would give the following output:

Enter invoked on Outer
Enter invoked on Inner
Within outer context...
do_foo invoked!
Still using outer...
Exit invoked on inner
Exit invoked on outer
Done using outer

but I got the following:

Enter invoked on Outer
Enter invoked on Inner
Exit invoked on inner
Within outer context...
do_foo invoked!
Still using outer...
Exit invoked on outer
Done using outer

Code:


class Inner(object):
  def __enter__(self):
    print "Enter invoked on Inner"
    return self

  def __exit__(self, typ, val, tb):
    print "Exit invoked on inner"

  def do_foo(self):
    print "do_foo invoked!"

class Outer(object):
  def __init__(self):
    self._inner = Inner()

  def __enter__(self):
    print "Enter invoked on Outer"

    with self._inner as ctx:
      return self

  def __exit__(self, typ, val, tb):
    print "Exit invoked on outer"

with Outer() as outer:
  print "Within outer context..."
  outer._inner.do_foo()
  print "Still using outer..."

print "Done using outer"

Any ideas on how to make this work?

1
  • I've upvoted this, it was an interesting question. – Aaron Hall Jun 16 '14 at 1:25
0

It's really a design question and a judgment call. I'm going to suggest the following:

Pool class instance provides a context, which then programmatically uses DB connection instances as needed. But that would be a bit more complex than simply calling __enter__ and __exit__ for each DB instance, and I don't think you should attempt to do that, they're not intended for that purpose. In this case, I would suggest directly using the DB instance's context manager.

If you want to use their context managers, something like this would work:

def __enter__(self):
    for db in self.pool:
        with db as d:
            d.transaction()

def __exit__(self, type, value, traceback):
    pass 

But if you want to error handle yourself:

def __enter__(self):
    for db in self.pool:
        try:
            db.connection()
            # ... write and transact here

def __exit__(self, type, value, traceback):
    if type is None: # no errors, so close as normal
        for db in self.pool:
            db.close()
    # ... more code here for proper error handling
2
  • 'A' is not a subclass of 'B', rather, 'B' uses an instance of 'A' to do it's job. – eddiewould Jun 16 '14 at 0:42
  • Have updated my description to hopefully indicate better what it is I'm trying to achieve (composite context management) – eddiewould Jun 16 '14 at 0:50

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