7

I have been searching a lot for any good examples of the use of a ControlsFX PropertySheet but couldn’t find anything but this.

https://www.google.nl/search?q=Main.java+amazonaws.com&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8&aq=t&rls=org.mozilla:nl:official&client=firefox-a&channel=sb&gfe_rd=cr&ei=d5aeU5bvBI3k-gan94HQBA#channel=sb&q=https%3A%2F%2Fbitbucket-assetroot.s3.amazonaws.com%2Fcontrolsfx%2Fcontrolsfx+Main.java&rls=org.mozilla:nl:official

In this example, the ObservableList items which includes NameItem objects, is added to the PropertySheet object in its constructor just like the documentation tells.

http://controlsfx.bitbucket.org/org/controlsfx/control/PropertySheet.html

However, as this documentation says, a column of a PropertySheet “provides a PropertyEditor that allows the end user the means to manipulate the property”. It even says that there is a “CheckEditor, ChoiceEditor, TextEditor and FontEditor, among the many editors that are available in the Editors package.”.

I don’t want to be limited to my NameItem example. I also want to add check boxes, choice boxes and other dynamic editor elements. Can anyone please give an example on how to use one or more of the editors to build a simple PropertySheet?

  • Have you looked at samples? Specifically HelloPropertySheet sample. – Eugene Ryzhikov Jun 18 '14 at 16:23
9

PropertySheet does support few property editors out of the box, depending on a property type.

Following example is an extension from ControlsFX sample application. It shows how String, LocalDate, Enum, Boolean and Integer types are mapped to the TextField, DatePicker, ChoiceBox, CheckBox and NumericField respectively.

public class PropertySheetExample extends VBox {
    private static Map<String, Object> customDataMap = new LinkedHashMap<>();
    static {
        customDataMap.put("Group 1#My Text", "Same text"); // Creates a TextField in property sheet
        customDataMap.put("Group 1#My Date", LocalDate.of(2000, Month.JANUARY, 1)); // Creates a DatePicker
        customDataMap.put("Group 2#My Enum Choice", SomeEnumType.EnumValue); // Creates a ChoiceBox
        customDataMap.put("Group 2#My Boolean", false); // Creates a CheckBox
        customDataMap.put("Group 2#My Number", 500); // Creates a NumericField
    }

    class CustomPropertyItem implements PropertySheet.Item {
        private String key;
        private String category, name;

        public CustomPropertyItem(String key) {
            this.key = key;
            String[] skey = key.split("#");
            category = skey[0];
            name = skey[1];
        }

        @Override
        public Class<?> getType() {
            return customDataMap.get(key).getClass();
        }

        @Override
        public String getCategory() {
            return category;
        }

        @Override
        public String getName() {
            return name;
        }

        @Override
        public String getDescription() {
            return null;
        }

        @Override
        public Object getValue() {
            return customDataMap.get(key);
        }

        @Override
        public void setValue(Object value) {
            customDataMap.put(key, value);
        }
    }

    public PropertySheetExample {
        ObservableList<PropertySheet.Item> list = FXCollections.observableArrayList();
        for (String key : customDataMap.keySet())
            list.add(new CustomPropertyItem(key));

        PropertySheet propertySheet = new PropertySheet(list);
        VBox.setVgrow(propertySheet, Priority.ALWAYS);
        getChildren().add(propertySheet);
    }
}

This behavior can be further extended in two ways. First, an existing editor can be used for types which are not supported by default property editor factory. Following example sets new property editor factory which will create ChoiceBox for List<String> type. For other types it delegates editor creation to the default factory.

SimpleObjectProperty<Callback<PropertySheet.Item, PropertyEditor<?>>> propertyEditorFactory = new SimpleObjectProperty<>(this, "propertyEditor", new DefaultPropertyEditorFactory());

propertySheet.setPropertyEditorFactory(new Callback<PropertySheet.Item, PropertyEditor<?>>() {
    @Override
    public PropertyEditor<?> call(PropertySheet.Item param) {
        if(param.getValue() instanceof List) {
            return Editors.createChoiceEditor(param, (List) param.getValue());
        }

        return propertyEditorFactory.get().call(param);
    }
});

And finally, we can create custom editor and override getPropertyEditorClass() method from the PropertySheet.Item to return the custom editor type. In that case, default property editor factory will create the editor, and there is no need to override the factory method.

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    Your answer is great but I cant find where to put this list to property thingy. When my data is selected, it becomes text again for some reason. – Jeredriq Demas Sep 24 '18 at 10:28
  • Not sure if this happens to you because of the property sheet - if you see the ComboBox when window is created it should stay ComboBox all the time. I generally extend the PropertySheet class and call setPropertyEditorFactory() method in the constructor. Then I put that my class into the window and that's all. – user645859 Sep 24 '18 at 20:44
3

Even after looking at the samples and trying to find out more, I was also very confused as to how to change the types of user input in a property sheet. It took me about a while to work out but it turns out the answer is relatively simple.

The key is the PropertyEditorFactory which can be set directly onto the PropertySheet using setPropertyEditorFactory(Callback<PropertySheet.Item,PropertyEditor<?>> factory) In this callback the method returns a type of PropertyEditor which are contained within the Editors package. As the call provides the PropertySheet.Item parameter, you can retrieve the value being set, in my example below I checked the type of the returned object to provide a relevant editor.

propertySheet.setPropertyEditorFactory(new Callback<PropertySheet.Item, PropertyEditor<?>>() {
    @Override
    public PropertyEditor<?> call(Item param) {
        if(param.getValue() instanceof String[]) {   
            return Editors.createChoiceEditor(param, choices);
         } else if (param.getValue() instanceof Boolean) {
            return Editors.createCheckEditor(param);
         } else if (param.getValue() instanceof Integer) {
            return Editors.createNumericEditor(param);
         } else {
            return Editors.createTextEditor(param);
         }
     }
});

Once you override this editor factory however, you must provide a PropertyEditor for every type of setting you need, for instance if you only returned Editors.createNumericEditor(param); but had String options, you'll get an exception. Also don't override getPropertyEditorClass() from PropertySheet.Item which is where I wasted most of my time. Hope this helps anyone else trying to do this!

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    where should I type this becuase whenever I choose something from the choice editor, it becomes a textfield and string again – Jeredriq Demas Sep 24 '18 at 10:39
1

I couldn't find any example for a custom Editor for the PropertySheet, but I think I figured it out now. In my case I simply want to use a Slider as an editor for a Number. This may not be practical, since you would have no way of seeing the value of the Slider, but I imagine the Slider could simply be replaced by a pane with the slider and a label.

To start with, we need our implementation of Item, here a slightly modified version of the controlsfx-samples. The Map was moved into this class, but could be anywhere. You might not want to use a map at all though, since it is already somewhat impractical to have the category and the name combined; plus there is no room to create descriptions for the items.

public class CustomPropertyItem implements PropertySheet.Item {
    public static Map<String, Object> customDataMap = new LinkedHashMap<>();
    static {
        customDataMap.put("basic.My Text", "Same text"); // Creates a TextField in property sheet
        customDataMap.put("basic.My Date", LocalDate.of(2016, Month.JANUARY, 1)); // Creates a DatePicker
        customDataMap.put("misc.My Enum", SomeEnum.ALPHA); // Creates a ChoiceBox
        customDataMap.put("misc.My Boolean", false); // Creates a CheckBox
        customDataMap.put("misc.My Number", 500); // Creates a NumericField
        customDataMap.put("misc.My Color", Color.ALICEBLUE); // Creates a ColorPicker
    }

    private String key;
    private String category, name;

    public CustomPropertyItem(String key) 
    {
        this.key = key;
        String[] skey = key.split("\\.", 2);
        category = skey[0];
        name = skey[1];
    }

    @Override
    public Class<?> getType() {
        return customDataMap.get(key).getClass();
    }

    @Override
    public String getCategory() {
        return category;
    }

    @Override
    public String getName() {
        return name;
    }

    @Override
    public String getDescription() {
        // doesn't really fit into the map
        return null;
    }

    @Override
    public Object getValue() {
        return customDataMap.get(key);
    }

    @Override
    public void setValue(Object value) {
        customDataMap.put(key, value);
    }

    @Override
    public Optional<ObservableValue<? extends Object>> getObservableValue() {
        return Optional.empty();
    }

    @Override
    public Optional<Class<? extends PropertyEditor<?>>> getPropertyEditorClass() {
        // for an item of type number, specify the type of editor to use
        if (Number.class.isAssignableFrom(getType())) return Optional.of(NumberSliderEditor.class);

        // ... return other editors for other types

        return Optional.empty();
    }
}

Next up, the PropertyEditor implementation, which is a Node and a set of methods that connect the property item value with a control. The first constructor is necessary for the implementation and the second constructor is needed, because the method Editors.createCustomEditor(Item) uses reflection to look for this constructor. You do not have to use this method, but the default PropertyEditorFactory most likely relies on this. If you want to avoid reflection for some reason, you don't need to override getPropertyEditorClass() in your Item and you can use setPropertyEditorFactory(Callback) and create a new instance of your PropertyEditor in there. Note that you don't need to use setPropertyEditorFactory(Callback) at all (in this example).

public class NumberSliderEditor extends AbstractPropertyEditor<Number, Slider> {

    public NumberSliderEditor(Item property, Slider control) 
    {
        super(property, control);
    }

    public NumberSliderEditor(Item item)
    {
        this(item, new Slider());
    }

    @Override
    public void setValue(Number n) {
        this.getEditor().setValue(n.doubleValue());
    }

    @Override
    protected ObservableValue<Number> getObservableValue() {
        return this.getEditor().valueProperty();
    }

}

From here on you just create your PropertySheet and add all the map entries.

PropertySheet propertySheet = new PropertySheet();
for (String key : CustomPropertyItem.customDataMap.keySet()) propertySheet.getItems().add(new CustomPropertyItem(key));

I hope this is helpful to anyone, as there don't seem to be any examples out there that show the use of a custom Editor. The only hint towards this is the javadoc of Item.getPropertyEditorClass(), which has a default interface implementation so you normally wouldn't look at it. The fact that there is an answer here saying not to look at this method didn't help either :/

| improve this answer | |

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.