148

I want to pass my Swift Array account.chats to chatsViewController.chats by reference (so that when I add a chat to account.chats, chatsViewController.chats still points to account.chats). I.e., I don't want Swift to separate the two arrays when the length of account.chats changes.

2
  • 3
    I ended up just making account a global variable and defining the chats property of ChatsViewController as: var chats: [Chat] { return account.chats }.
    – ma11hew28
    Jan 2, 2017 at 23:12
  • ma11hew28, your solution is worthy of an Answer. You could also add a setter to make chats updateable. var chats: [Chat] { get { return account.chats } set { account.chats = newValue } }
    – jk7
    Jun 10, 2022 at 17:18

9 Answers 9

156

For function parameter operator we use:

let (it's default operator, so we can omit let) to make a parameter constant (it means we cannot modify even local copy);

var to make it variable (we can modify it locally, but it wont affect the external variable that has been passed to the function); and

inout to make it an in-out parameter. In-out means in fact passing variable by reference, not by value. And it requires not only to accept value by reference, by also to pass it by reference, so pass it with & - foo(&myVar) instead of just foo(myVar)

So do it like this:

var arr = [1, 2, 3]

func addItem(_ localArr: inout [Int]) {
    localArr.append(4)
}

addItem(&arr)    
print(arr) // it will print [1, 2, 3, 4]

To be exact it's not just a reference, but a real alias for the external variable, so you can do such a trick with any variable type, for example with integer (you can assign new value to it), though it may not be a good practice and it may be confusing to modify the primitive data types like this.

8
  • 13
    This does not really explain how to use array as an instance variable that is referenced not copied. Jan 15, 2015 at 10:20
  • 2
    I thought inout used a getter and a setter to copy the array to a temporary and then reset it on the way out of the function - i.e. it copies
    – dumbledad
    Oct 5, 2015 at 9:41
  • 2
    Actually in-out uses copy-in copy-out or call by value result. However, as an optimization it may use by reference. "As an optimization, when the argument is a value stored at a physical address in memory, the same memory location is used both inside and outside the function body. The optimized behavior is known as call by reference; it satisfies all of the requirements of the copy-in copy-out model while removing the overhead of copying." Mar 28, 2016 at 17:47
  • 12
    In Swift 3, inout position has changed, i.e. func addItem(localArr: inout [Int])
    – elquimista
    Dec 1, 2016 at 5:34
  • 4
    Also, var is no longer available for function parameter attribute.
    – elquimista
    Dec 1, 2016 at 5:41
87

Structs in Swift are passed by value, but you can use the inout modifier to modify your array (see answers below). Classes are passed by reference. Array and Dictionary in Swift are implemented as structs.

6
  • 2
    Array is not copied / passed by value in Swift - it has very different behavior in Swift compared to regular struct. See stackoverflow.com/questions/24450284/…
    – Boon
    Jun 29, 2014 at 15:39
  • 16
    @Boon Array is still semantically copied/passed-by-value, but just optimised to use COW.
    – eonil
    Oct 14, 2014 at 3:38
  • 4
    And I don't recommend using of NSArray because NSArray and Swift array have subtle semantic differences (such as reference-type), and that possibly lead you to more bugs.
    – eonil
    Oct 14, 2014 at 4:00
  • 2
    This was seriously killing me. I was banging my head why things not working the way.
    – khunshan
    Nov 26, 2015 at 11:30
  • 2
    What if using inout with Structs?
    – Alston
    Feb 7, 2016 at 4:54
27

Define yourself a BoxedArray<T> that implements the Array interface but delegates all functions to a stored property. As such

class BoxedArray<T> : MutableCollection, Reflectable, ... {
  var array : Array<T>

  // ...

  subscript (index: Int) -> T { 
    get { return array[index] }
    set(newValue) { array[index] = newValue }
  }
}

Use the BoxedArray anywhere you'd use an Array. Assigning of a BoxedArray will be by reference, it is a class, and thus changes to the stored property, through the Array interface, will be visible to all references.

4
  • A bit scary solution :) - not exactly elegant - but it seems it would work. Jan 15, 2015 at 10:21
  • Well, it sure is better than falling back to 'Use NSArray' to get 'pass by reference semantics'!
    – GoZoner
    Jan 15, 2015 at 16:25
  • 17
    I just have a feeling defining Array as struct instead of class is language design mistake. Jan 18, 2015 at 11:06
  • 1
    I agree. There is also the abomination where String is a subtype of Any BUT if you import Foundation then String becomes a subtype of AnyObject.
    – GoZoner
    Jan 18, 2015 at 15:16
19

For Swift versions 3-4 (XCode 8-9), use

var arr = [1, 2, 3]

func addItem(_ localArr: inout [Int]) {
    localArr.append(4)
}

addItem(&arr)
print(arr)
0
3

Something like

var a : Int[] = []
func test(inout b : Int[]) {
    b += [1,2,3,4,5]
}
test(&a)
println(a)

???

3
  • 4
    I think the question is asking for a means to have properties of two different objects point to the same array. If that's the case, Kaan's answer is correct: one must either wrap the array in a class, or use NSArray. Jun 16, 2014 at 20:00
  • 1
    right, inout works only for the lifetime of the function body (no closure behaviour) Jun 16, 2014 at 20:01
  • Minor nit: it's func test(b: inout [Int]) ... maybe this is an old syntax; I only got into Swift in 2016 and this answer is from 2014 so maybe things used to be different?
    – Ray Toal
    Nov 2, 2019 at 18:08
3

One other option is to have the consumer of the array ask the owner for it as needed. For example, something along the lines of:

class Account {
    var chats : [String]!
    var chatsViewController : ChatsViewController!

    func InitViewController() {
        chatsViewController.getChats = { return self.chats }
    }

}

class ChatsViewController {
    var getChats: (() -> ([String]))!

    func doSomethingWithChats() {
        let chats = getChats()
        // use it as needed
    }
}

You can then modify the array as much as you like inside the Account class. Note that this doesn't help you if you want to also modify the array from the view controller class.

1

Using inout is one solution but it doesn't feel very swifty to me since arrays are value types. Stylistically I personally prefer to return a mutated copy:

func doSomething(to arr: [Int]) -> [Int] {
    var arr = arr
    arr.append(3) // or likely some more complex operation
    return arr
}

var ids = [1, 2]
ids = doSomething(to: ids)
print(ids) // [1,2,3]
4
  • 1
    There is a performance downside to this sort of thing. It uses a tad bit less phone battery to just modify the original array :) Jun 12, 2020 at 23:16
  • I respectfully disagree. In this case readability at the call site generally trumps the performance hit. Start with immutable code and then optimize by making it mutable later. There are cases with massive arrays where you are correct but in most apps that's a 0.01% edge case.
    – ToddH
    Jun 14, 2020 at 6:37
  • 1
    I don't know what you are disagreeing with. There is a performance penalty to copy the array and lesser performance operations do use more CPU and therefore more battery. I think you assumed that I was saying that it is a better solution, which I was not. I was making sure people have all of the information available to make an informed choice. Jun 15, 2020 at 18:07
  • 1
    Yep, you're correct, there's no question inout is more efficient. I thought you were suggesting that inout is universally better because it saves battery. To which I'd say the readability, immutability, and thread safety of this solution are universally better and that inout should only be used as an optimization in those rare cases where the use case warrants it.
    – ToddH
    Jun 16, 2020 at 19:33
1

use a NSMutableArray or a NSArray, which are classes

this way you don't need to implment any wraper and can use the build in bridging

open class NSArray : NSObject, NSCopying, NSMutableCopying, NSSecureCoding, NSFastEnumeration
-1

Based off of GoZoner's BoxedArray answer, I created the class below that worked for me. I like the freedom of passing around arrays as references (as the other languages I work with do).

class MArray<T> : MutableCollection {
    
    var array : Array<T> = Array()
    var count: Int { return array.count }   // getter (without, index func below will be called repeatedly to determine)
    
    func add(_ value: T) {
        array.append(value)
    }

    // MutableCollection requires:
    subscript (index: Int) -> T {
      get { return array[index] }
      set(value) { array[index] = value }
    }
    var startIndex: Int {
        return 0
    }
    var endIndex: Int {
        return array.count
    }
    func index(after i: Int) -> Int {
        return i+1
    }
}

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.