24

I'm using node-cron to run scheduled jobs. I want the jobs to run every 45 minutes, but its acting strangely

Here's the pattern I'm using

'00 */45 * * * *'

I started my script at Tue Jun 17 2014 08:17:39 GMT+0000 (GMT)

Here's are the first couple of times the job was executed

1. Tue Jun 17 2014 08:45:03 GMT+0000 (GMT)

2. Tue Jun 17 2014 09:00:01 GMT+0000 (GMT)

3. Tue Jun 17 2014 09:45:02 GMT+0000 (GMT)

This is definitely not what I expected or want. All I want is to run the Jobs every 45 minutes. Can anyone help me with the pattern? Thanks :)

10 Answers 10

55

You're probably looking for

0 */45 * * * *

The ranges are here.

  • Seconds: 0-59
  • Minutes: 0-59
  • Hours: 0-23
  • Day of Month: 1-31
  • Months: 0-11
  • Day of Week: 0-6
8
  • 11
    It's not "every 45 minutes" but "every hour at 45".
    – Cody
    Jun 17, 2014 at 9:48
  • tested this out, but it seems to run every second as well, which makes sense because of the first * When started at 17:50:18 it runs at 18:00:01 18:00:02 etc I'm going to try 00 in place of the first *
    – SamAko
    Jun 17, 2014 at 18:22
  • 1
    got it to work with a slight adjustment to the seconds field, here's the pattern; 0 */45 * * * *
    – SamAko
    Jun 22, 2014 at 5:45
  • @elimence: I've never used node-cron, but it appears that it's intended to be compatible with cron, with the addition of a "seconds" column. Does 0 */45 * * * * really run the job every 45 minutes? I'd expect it to run twice an hour, at 0 and 45 minutes after the hour (08:00, 08:45, 09:00, 09:45, 10:00, 10:45, ...). Jun 22, 2014 at 19:47
  • 4
    @elimence: Consider whether it would be fairer to accept an answer to the question you actually asked, rather than one that matches the string in your question that you very specifically said didn't meet your requirements. There's nothing wrong with changing your mind about what you wan to do, but we're not mind readers. (BTW, would running the command every 30 minutes meet your revised requirements?) Jun 24, 2014 at 0:01
22

I'm more familiar with cron than with node-cron, but I've taken a quick look at the documentation.

If I understand it correctly, node-cron uses a syntax similar to that used by cron, but with an additional "seconds" field. So where a cron job might have:

# min hour mday month wday command
*/15  *    *    *     *    some-command

to schedule some-command to run every 15 minutes, node-cron would use a similar syntax to specify the time to run:

'0 */15 * * * *'

(with an additional field to specify seconds), but it executes a specified JavaScript function, not an external command.

In standard cron, there is no syntax to specify running a job every 45 minutes. A specification of 0/45 * * * * would run a job twice each hour, at 0 and 45 minutes after the hour. To run a job every 45 minutes (at 00:00, 00:45, 01:30, 02:15, ..., i.e., 32 times per day) you'd have to schedule it to run every 15 minutes, and then invoke a script that checks the current time to decide whether to do anything.

Or you can write an exhaustive list of all the times you want the job to run:

 0  0 * * * some-command
45  0 * * * some_command
30  1 * * * some_command
15  2 * * * some_command
# 28 lines omitted

I'd definitely want to write a script to generate this list.

(This is workable because 24 hours happens to be a multiple of 45 minutes. You couldn't run something every 35 minutes this way.)

A similar approach should work for node-cron. Schedule the function to run every 15 minutes, and invoke a function that checks the current time to decide whether to run. For example, you can check whether the number of minutes since midnight modulo 45 is zero. (You might want to allow for a small variance in case the scheduling is not exact.)

I don't know JavaScript well enough to suggest the best way to write this function, but it should be reasonably straightforward.

Or write 32 lines to specify all the times you want it to run.

2

There is no direct way to do this. However, we can get the result by intercepting the schedule using a shell command within the target script.

First, run the script at every 15 minutes:

*/15 * * * * <target_script>

Then, within the target_script, place the following code before actual codes:

#!/bin/sh

# Exit except at 0:45, 1:30, 2:15, 3:00, 3:45 etc

if ! echo "((`date +%-H`*60)+`date +%-M`)/45" | bc -l | grep "\.0*$" &> /dev/null;
then exit 1;
fi

# Your actual code goes here;
2

I tried this string for a 45-second interval and it works well:

'*/45 * * * * *'
1
  • Did it? I'd expect that to run twice every minute, and 0 and 45 seconds after the minute (alternating 45-second and 15-second intervals). Mar 27, 2020 at 19:47
1

You need to write a script as a wrapper to decide if the actual command shall be executed at every 45 minutes. That's 0, 45, 30 (= 45 + 45 - 60), 15 (= 30 + 45 - 60), 0 (= 15 + 45 - 60). so, the minutes to run the script shall be 0,15,30,45.

The command date +%M may be helpful in the shell script.

3
  • I'm using a library called node-cron, all it requires from me is the right cron pattern. I don't think I can write scripts to work with it, if thats possible, then I don't know how. heres a link github.com/ncb000gt/node-cron
    – SamAko
    Jun 17, 2014 at 18:38
  • Sorry, I don't use node-cron. Never heard of it. The method above is for cron. Maybe node-cron has some additional syntax that cron doesn't have. I've met a similar problem, and have read the manual of crontab. I don't think it's possible for cron to do things like "every two weeks" or "every 45 minutes". So, writing a script as a wrapper to check whether to run seems to be the only choice.
    – Cody
    Jun 18, 2014 at 3:26
  • I think you probably have the right idea. But since node-cron schedules execution of JavaScript code, not commands, the OP will need to write a JavaScript function that checks whether it should run. Jun 22, 2014 at 19:54
1

you can use node-reel which is more readable, straight forward and awesome 😉.

const reel = require('node-reel')

reel().call(() => {
    console.log(Date.now());
}).everyFortyFiveMinutes().run()

https://github.com/shakee93/node-reel

0

use cron npm moduel something like this

var cronJob = require('cron').CronJob;  
var job = new cronJob({ 
    cronTime:'0 */45 * * * *', 
    onTick: function(){
        var my_date = new Date();
        var tomorrow_date = my_date.getFullYear() + "-" + ('0'+(my_date.getMonth()+1)) + "-" + (my_date.getDate()+1)
        var condition = [{},{$set: {'plannedDeliveryDate' :tomorrow_date +'T00:00:00.000Z'}}]
        dbQuery.updateMany(orderModel, condition, function(err, result){
            if(result.nModified == result.n) console.log(err, result)
        })
    },
    start:true,
    timeZone:'Asia/Kolkata'
});
job.start();
0

You can refer to cronr, it supports all the macro pattern and provides online demo cronr -- online demo

0

Answer: */45 * * * *

This will run every 45th minute


Have a look here for clear understanding 👇

https://crontab.guru/#/45_*_

0

Just recently (27|01|22) used Node Cron in my project

const TaskSchedulerTimeInterval = 45;

// Runs a job for every 45 mins asynchronously
const fetchYoutubeAPIScheduler = () => {
    try {
        nodeCron.schedule(`*/${TaskSchedulerTimeInterval} * * * *`, async () => {
            console.log('Running');
        })
    } catch (error) {
        console.log('error =', error);
    }
};

Underlying Meaning (loved the explanations given by others, so referencing them together in one post) :

#sec min hour monthday month weekday
*/15  *    *     *       *       *  

Above example runs every 15 secs

range of each field:

Sec: 0-59
Min: 0-59
Hour: 0-23
monthday(Day of Month): 1-31
Months: 0-11
weekDay(Day of Week): 0-6
2
  • A good answer will always include an explanation why this would solve the issue, so that the OP and any future readers can learn from it.
    – Tyler2P
    Jan 30 at 11:35
  • Thanks for letting me know! I have added explanations now @Tyler2P.
    – Akshay R R
    Feb 3 at 3:42

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