297

I am trying to use hex color values in Swift, instead of the few standard ones that UIColor allows you to use, but I have no idea how to do it.

Example: how would I use #ffffff as a color?

32 Answers 32

608

#ffffff are actually 3 color components in hexadecimal notation - red ff, green ff and blue ff. You can write hexadecimal notation in Swift using 0x prefix, e.g 0xFF

To simplify the conversion, let's create an initializer that takes integer (0 - 255) values:

extension UIColor {
   convenience init(red: Int, green: Int, blue: Int) {
       assert(red >= 0 && red <= 255, "Invalid red component")
       assert(green >= 0 && green <= 255, "Invalid green component")
       assert(blue >= 0 && blue <= 255, "Invalid blue component")

       self.init(red: CGFloat(red) / 255.0, green: CGFloat(green) / 255.0, blue: CGFloat(blue) / 255.0, alpha: 1.0)
   }

   convenience init(rgb: Int) {
       self.init(
           red: (rgb >> 16) & 0xFF,
           green: (rgb >> 8) & 0xFF,
           blue: rgb & 0xFF
       )
   }
}

Usage:

let color = UIColor(red: 0xFF, green: 0xFF, blue: 0xFF)
let color2 = UIColor(rgb: 0xFFFFFF)

How to get alpha?

Depending on your use case, you can simply use the native UIColor.withAlphaComponent method, e.g.

let semitransparentBlack = UIColor(rgb: 0x000000).withAlphaComponent(0.5)

Or you can add an additional (optional) parameter to the above methods:

convenience init(red: Int, green: Int, blue: Int, a: CGFloat = 1.0) {
    self.init(
        red: CGFloat(red) / 255.0,
        green: CGFloat(green) / 255.0,
        blue: CGFloat(blue) / 255.0,
        alpha: a
    )
}

convenience init(rgb: Int, a: CGFloat = 1.0) {
    self.init(
        red: (rgb >> 16) & 0xFF,
        green: (rgb >> 8) & 0xFF,
        blue: rgb & 0xFF,
        a: a
    )
}

(we cannot name the parameter alpha because of a name collision with the existing initializer).

Called as:

let color = UIColor(red: 0xFF, green: 0xFF, blue: 0xFF, a: 0.5)
let color2 = UIColor(rgb: 0xFFFFFF, a: 0.5)

To get the alpha as an integer 0-255, we can

convenience init(red: Int, green: Int, blue: Int, a: Int = 0xFF) {
    self.init(
        red: CGFloat(red) / 255.0,
        green: CGFloat(green) / 255.0,
        blue: CGFloat(blue) / 255.0,
        alpha: CGFloat(a) / 255.0
    )
}

// let's suppose alpha is the first component (ARGB)
convenience init(argb: Int) {
    self.init(
        red: (argb >> 16) & 0xFF,
        green: (argb >> 8) & 0xFF,
        blue: argb & 0xFF,
        a: (argb >> 24) & 0xFF
    )
}

Called as

let color = UIColor(red: 0xFF, green: 0xFF, blue: 0xFF, a: 0xFF)
let color2 = UIColor(argb: 0xFFFFFFFF)

Or a combination of the previous methods. There is absolutely no need to use strings.

  • 88
    Great solution! Why on earth wouldn't Apple already have something like this???? – Oliver Spryn Apr 12 '15 at 1:05
  • 1
    @confile No, because that's not standardized. Alpha can be the first component or the last. If you need alpha, just add one parameter alpha – Sulthan Apr 25 '15 at 13:20
  • 4
    Same solution, Swift 1.2 compatible, with alpha support: gist.github.com/berikv/ecf1f79c5bc9921c47ef – Berik May 21 '15 at 12:43
  • 1
    Why not use UInt8 instead of asserting that your ints are in range 0...255? – Richard Venable Mar 21 '16 at 13:59
  • 4
    It's 2017, and Apple still doesn't have something like this. – Annjawn Nov 29 '17 at 21:04
297

This is a function that takes a hex string and returns a UIColor.
(You can enter hex strings with either format: #ffffff or ffffff)

Usage:

var color1 = hexStringToUIColor("#d3d3d3")

Swift 5: (Swift 4+)

func hexStringToUIColor (hex:String) -> UIColor {
    var cString:String = hex.trimmingCharacters(in: .whitespacesAndNewlines).uppercased()

    if (cString.hasPrefix("#")) {
        cString.remove(at: cString.startIndex)
    }

    if ((cString.count) != 6) {
        return UIColor.gray
    }

    var rgbValue:UInt32 = 0
    Scanner(string: cString).scanHexInt32(&rgbValue)

    return UIColor(
        red: CGFloat((rgbValue & 0xFF0000) >> 16) / 255.0,
        green: CGFloat((rgbValue & 0x00FF00) >> 8) / 255.0,
        blue: CGFloat(rgbValue & 0x0000FF) / 255.0,
        alpha: CGFloat(1.0)
    )
}

Swift 3:

func hexStringToUIColor (hex:String) -> UIColor {
    var cString:String = hex.trimmingCharacters(in: .whitespacesAndNewlines).uppercased()

    if (cString.hasPrefix("#")) {
        cString.remove(at: cString.startIndex)
    }

    if ((cString.characters.count) != 6) {
        return UIColor.gray
    }

    var rgbValue:UInt32 = 0
    Scanner(string: cString).scanHexInt32(&rgbValue)

    return UIColor(
        red: CGFloat((rgbValue & 0xFF0000) >> 16) / 255.0,
        green: CGFloat((rgbValue & 0x00FF00) >> 8) / 255.0,
        blue: CGFloat(rgbValue & 0x0000FF) / 255.0,
        alpha: CGFloat(1.0)
    )
}

Swift 2:

func hexStringToUIColor (hex:String) -> UIColor {
    var cString:String = hex.stringByTrimmingCharactersInSet(NSCharacterSet.whitespaceAndNewlineCharacterSet() as NSCharacterSet).uppercaseString

    if (cString.hasPrefix("#")) {
      cString = cString.substringFromIndex(cString.startIndex.advancedBy(1))
    }

    if ((cString.characters.count) != 6) {
      return UIColor.grayColor()
    }

    var rgbValue:UInt32 = 0
    NSScanner(string: cString).scanHexInt(&rgbValue)

    return UIColor(
        red: CGFloat((rgbValue & 0xFF0000) >> 16) / 255.0,
        green: CGFloat((rgbValue & 0x00FF00) >> 8) / 255.0,
        blue: CGFloat(rgbValue & 0x0000FF) / 255.0,
        alpha: CGFloat(1.0)
    )
}



Source: arshad/gist:de147c42d7b3063ef7bc

Edit: Updated the code. Thanks, Hlung, jaytrixz, and Ahmad F!

  • robustness ftw! – Hlung Apr 6 '15 at 16:22
  • countelements is now just count :) – Hlung Apr 6 '15 at 16:24
  • @Hlung and @ethanstrider it looks like they don't even let you do count now instead of countElements, any idea what they want us to use? – SRMR Aug 30 '15 at 0:49
  • Before Swift 2.0, count was a global function. As of Swift 2.0, it can be called as a member function (i.e. aString.count). – Ethan Strider Sep 1 '15 at 16:22
  • 2
    Changed this line of code cString = cString.substringFromIndex(advance(cString.startIndex, 1)) to cString = cString.substringFromIndex(cString.startIndex.advancedBy(1)) for Swift 2.2 Xcode 7.3 – jaytrixz Apr 2 '16 at 7:29
143

Swift 4 UIColor extension:

extension UIColor {
    convenience init(hexString: String) {
        let hex = hexString.trimmingCharacters(in: CharacterSet.alphanumerics.inverted)
        var int = UInt32()
        Scanner(string: hex).scanHexInt32(&int)
        let a, r, g, b: UInt32
        switch hex.count {
        case 3: // RGB (12-bit)
            (a, r, g, b) = (255, (int >> 8) * 17, (int >> 4 & 0xF) * 17, (int & 0xF) * 17)
        case 6: // RGB (24-bit)
            (a, r, g, b) = (255, int >> 16, int >> 8 & 0xFF, int & 0xFF)
        case 8: // ARGB (32-bit)
            (a, r, g, b) = (int >> 24, int >> 16 & 0xFF, int >> 8 & 0xFF, int & 0xFF)
        default:
            (a, r, g, b) = (255, 0, 0, 0)
        }
        self.init(red: CGFloat(r) / 255, green: CGFloat(g) / 255, blue: CGFloat(b) / 255, alpha: CGFloat(a) / 255)
    }
}

Usage:

let darkGrey = UIColor(hexString: "#757575")

Swift 2.x version:

extension UIColor {
    convenience init(hexString: String) {
        let hex = hexString.stringByTrimmingCharactersInSet(NSCharacterSet.alphanumericCharacterSet().invertedSet)
        var int = UInt32()
        NSScanner(string: hex).scanHexInt(&int)
        let a, r, g, b: UInt32
        switch hex.characters.count {
        case 3: // RGB (12-bit)
            (a, r, g, b) = (255, (int >> 8) * 17, (int >> 4 & 0xF) * 17, (int & 0xF) * 17)
        case 6: // RGB (24-bit)
            (a, r, g, b) = (255, int >> 16, int >> 8 & 0xFF, int & 0xFF)
        case 8: // ARGB (32-bit)
            (a, r, g, b) = (int >> 24, int >> 16 & 0xFF, int >> 8 & 0xFF, int & 0xFF)
        default:
            (a, r, g, b) = (255, 0, 0, 0)
        }
        self.init(red: CGFloat(r) / 255, green: CGFloat(g) / 255, blue: CGFloat(b) / 255, alpha: CGFloat(a) / 255)
    }
}
  • 1
    This is my favorite implementation because of the way it handles the 3 cases. But I prefer the default: case to return nil, instead of white. – Richard Venable Mar 21 '16 at 13:54
  • by the way, the default case in this implementation seems to be UIColor.yellow() – Gui Moura Apr 15 '16 at 19:33
  • 2
    This does not work correctly with alpha values. e.g. Both inputs "ff00ff00" and "#ff00ff00" will output an RGBA of 0 1 0 1. (It should be 1 0 1 0). The input "#ff00ff" results in 1 0 1 1, which is correct. (Xcode 8.2.1, iOS 9.3.) – Womble Jan 6 '17 at 3:39
  • 2
    @Womble the first component is the alpha not the last one. So "#ff00ff00" has alpha 1 because of the "ff" at the beginning. I think you meant "#00ff00ff". Another example: "#ff00ff00" this is green with alpha 1, "#0000ff00" this is green with alpha 0 – Luca Torella Jan 6 '17 at 10:09
  • 1
    So this is ARGB instead of RGBA... – Jonny Jun 19 '18 at 10:23
67

UIColor:

extension UIColor {

    convenience init(hex: Int) {
        let components = (
            R: CGFloat((hex >> 16) & 0xff) / 255,
            G: CGFloat((hex >> 08) & 0xff) / 255,
            B: CGFloat((hex >> 00) & 0xff) / 255
        )
        self.init(red: components.R, green: components.G, blue: components.B, alpha: 1)
    }

}

CGColor:

extension CGColor {

    class func colorWithHex(hex: Int) -> CGColorRef {

        return UIColor(hex: hex).CGColor

    }

}

Usage

let purple = UIColor(hex: 0xAB47BC)
  • 4
    In my humble opinion, I found this the easiest to use and very clear compared to other answers. – thandasoru Dec 25 '14 at 12:35
  • 1
    How would you handle 123ABC? The compiler is burking at it not being a digit. – Islam Q. Mar 2 '16 at 6:28
  • 1
    for completeness: let foo: Int = 0x123ABC - note the '0x' – Carsten Apr 5 '16 at 14:34
  • Alas, like many other hex converters, this doesn't handle alpha components. So, for example, you can't get a UIColor.clear value from it. – Womble Jan 6 '17 at 3:27
  • This is a very good solution. – Ariel Antonio Fundora May 9 '18 at 11:10
35

Swift 4 : Combining the answers of Sulthan and Luca Torella :

extension UIColor {
    convenience init(hexFromString:String, alpha:CGFloat = 1.0) {
        var cString:String = hexFromString.trimmingCharacters(in: .whitespacesAndNewlines).uppercased()
        var rgbValue:UInt32 = 10066329 //color #999999 if string has wrong format

        if (cString.hasPrefix("#")) {
            cString.remove(at: cString.startIndex)
        }

        if ((cString.count) == 6) {
            Scanner(string: cString).scanHexInt32(&rgbValue)
        }

        self.init(
            red: CGFloat((rgbValue & 0xFF0000) >> 16) / 255.0,
            green: CGFloat((rgbValue & 0x00FF00) >> 8) / 255.0,
            blue: CGFloat(rgbValue & 0x0000FF) / 255.0,
            alpha: alpha
        )
    }
}

Usage examples:

let myColor = UIColor(hexFromString: "4F9BF5")

let myColor = UIColor(hexFromString: "#4F9BF5")

let myColor = UIColor(hexFromString: "#4F9BF5", alpha: 0.5)
  • This one works seamlessly. !! – Yash Bedi May 3 at 10:44
  • Still working with swift 4.0 and later – iMHitesh Surani May 8 at 11:03
24

With Swift 2.0 and Xcode 7.0.1 you can create this function:

    // Creates a UIColor from a Hex string.
    func colorWithHexString (hex:String) -> UIColor {
        var cString:String = hex.stringByTrimmingCharactersInSet(NSCharacterSet.whitespaceAndNewlineCharacterSet()).uppercaseString

        if (cString.hasPrefix("#")) {
            cString = (cString as NSString).substringFromIndex(1)
        }

        if (cString.characters.count != 6) {
            return UIColor.grayColor()
        }

        let rString = (cString as NSString).substringToIndex(2)
        let gString = ((cString as NSString).substringFromIndex(2) as NSString).substringToIndex(2)
        let bString = ((cString as NSString).substringFromIndex(4) as NSString).substringToIndex(2)

        var r:CUnsignedInt = 0, g:CUnsignedInt = 0, b:CUnsignedInt = 0;
        NSScanner(string: rString).scanHexInt(&r)
        NSScanner(string: gString).scanHexInt(&g)
        NSScanner(string: bString).scanHexInt(&b)


        return UIColor(red: CGFloat(r) / 255.0, green: CGFloat(g) / 255.0, blue: CGFloat(b) / 255.0, alpha: CGFloat(1))
    }

and then use it in this way:

let color1 = colorWithHexString("#1F437C")

Updated For Swift 4

func colorWithHexString (hex:String) -> UIColor {

    var cString = hex.trimmingCharacters(in: CharacterSet.whitespacesAndNewlines).uppercased()

    if (cString.hasPrefix("#")) {
        cString = (cString as NSString).substring(from: 1)
    }

    if (cString.characters.count != 6) {
        return UIColor.gray
    }

    let rString = (cString as NSString).substring(to: 2)
    let gString = ((cString as NSString).substring(from: 2) as NSString).substring(to: 2)
    let bString = ((cString as NSString).substring(from: 4) as NSString).substring(to: 2)

    var r:CUnsignedInt = 0, g:CUnsignedInt = 0, b:CUnsignedInt = 0;
    Scanner(string: rString).scanHexInt32(&r)
    Scanner(string: gString).scanHexInt32(&g)
    Scanner(string: bString).scanHexInt32(&b)


    return UIColor(red: CGFloat(r) / 255.0, green: CGFloat(g) / 255.0, blue: CGFloat(b) / 255.0, alpha: CGFloat(1))
}
19

Swift 4: Hex and CSS color name support via a UIColor

Gist code

Example strings:

  • Orange, Lime, Tomato, etc.
  • Clear, Transparent, nil, and empty string yield [UIColor clearColor]
  • abc
  • abc7
  • #abc7
  • 00FFFF
  • #00FFFF
  • 00FFFF77

Playground output: Playground output

14

The sample should work on Swift2.2, Swift2.3, Swift3, Swift4:

public extension UIColor {
    convenience init(hex: Int, alpha: Double = 1.0) {
        self.init(red: CGFloat((hex>>16)&0xFF)/255.0, green: CGFloat((hex>>8)&0xFF)/255.0, blue: CGFloat((hex)&0xFF)/255.0, alpha: CGFloat(255 * alpha) / 255)
    }

    convenience init(hexString: String, alpha: Double = 1.0) {
        let hex = hexString.trimmingCharacters(in: CharacterSet.alphanumerics.inverted)
        var int = UInt32()
        Scanner(string: hex).scanHexInt32(&int)
        let r, g, b: UInt32
        switch hex.count {
        case 3: // RGB (12-bit)
            (r, g, b) = ((int >> 8) * 17, (int >> 4 & 0xF) * 17, (int & 0xF) * 17)
        case 6: // RGB (24-bit)
            (r, g, b) = (int >> 16, int >> 8 & 0xFF, int & 0xFF)
        default:
            (r, g, b) = (1, 1, 0)
        }
        self.init(red: CGFloat(r) / 255, green: CGFloat(g) / 255, blue: CGFloat(b) / 255, alpha: CGFloat(255 * alpha) / 255)
    }
}

Use them like below: Example

Old Answer

I've made another UIColor extension in Swift 2.2, it can use hex value to UIColor straight, wish can help someone:

extension UIColor {
   convenience init(hex: Int, alpha: Double = 1.0) {
      self.init(red: CGFloat((hex>>16)&0xFF)/255.0, green:CGFloat((hex>>8)&0xFF)/255.0, blue: CGFloat((hex)&0xFF)/255.0, alpha:  CGFloat(255 * alpha) / 255)
   }
}

And use it like this:

UIColor(hex: 0xffffff) // r 1.0 g 1.0 b 1.0 a 1.0
UIColor(hex: 0xffffff, alpha: 0.5) // r 1.0 g 1.0 b 1.0 a 0.5
13

This answer shows how to do it in Obj-C. The bridge is to use

let rgbValue = 0xFFEEDD
let r = Float((rgbValue & 0xFF0000) >> 16)/255.0
let g = Float((rgbValue & 0xFF00) >> 8)/255.0
let b = Float((rgbValue & 0xFF))/255.0
self.backgroundColor = UIColor(red:r, green: g, blue: b, alpha: 1.0)
  • why does this have no votes? this is exactly what I needed – quemeful Mar 28 '15 at 19:52
10

The simplest way to add color programmatically is by using ColorLiteral.

Just add the property ColorLiteral as shown in the example, Xcode will prompt you with a whole list of colors which you can choose. The advantage of doing so is lesser code, add HEX values or RGB. You will also get the recently used colors from the storyboard.

Example: self.view.backgroundColor = ColorLiteral enter image description here

  • 2
    Wow! you are the champ... I was looking for a really simple solution... This is the one... Cheers... – jeet.chanchawat Sep 26 '18 at 12:30
  • 1
    This is useful! – Brad Thomas Mar 18 at 23:02
6

Another method

Swift 3.0

Write a extension for UIColor

// To change the HexaDecimal value to Corresponding Color
extension UIColor
{
    class func uicolorFromHex(_ rgbValue:UInt32, alpha : CGFloat)->UIColor

    {
        let red = CGFloat((rgbValue & 0xFF0000) >> 16) / 255.0
        let green = CGFloat((rgbValue & 0xFF00) >> 8) / 255.0
        let blue = CGFloat(rgbValue & 0xFF) / 255.0
        return UIColor(red:red, green:green, blue:blue, alpha: alpha)
    }
}

you can directly create UIColor with hex like this

let carrot = UIColor.uicolorFromHex(0xe67e22, alpha: 1))
5

Latest swift3 Version

        extension UIColor {
convenience init(hexString: String) {
    let hex = hexString.trimmingCharacters(in: CharacterSet.alphanumerics.inverted)
    var int = UInt32()
    Scanner(string: hex).scanHexInt32(&int)
    let a, r, g, b: UInt32
    switch hex.characters.count {
    case 3: // RGB (12-bit)
        (a, r, g, b) = (255, (int >> 8) * 17, (int >> 4 & 0xF) * 17, (int & 0xF) * 17)
    case 6: // RGB (24-bit)
        (a, r, g, b) = (255, int >> 16, int >> 8 & 0xFF, int & 0xFF)
    case 8: // ARGB (32-bit)
        (a, r, g, b) = (int >> 24, int >> 16 & 0xFF, int >> 8 & 0xFF, int & 0xFF)
    default:
        (a, r, g, b) = (255, 0, 0, 0)
    }
      self.init(red: CGFloat(r) / 255, green: CGFloat(g) / 255, blue:      CGFloat(b) / 255, alpha: CGFloat(a) / 255)
}
}

Use in your class or where ever you converted into hexcolor to uicolor like in this way

             let color1 = UIColor(hexString: "#FF323232")
4

Hex with validation

Based on Eduardo answer

Details

  • Xcode 10.0, Swift 4.2
  • Xcode 10.2.1 (10E1001), Swift 5

Solution

import UIKit

extension UIColor {

    convenience init(r: UInt8, g: UInt8, b: UInt8, alpha: CGFloat = 1.0) {
        let divider: CGFloat = 255.0
        self.init(red: CGFloat(r)/divider, green: CGFloat(g)/divider, blue: CGFloat(b)/divider, alpha: alpha)
    }

    private convenience init(rgbWithoutValidation value: Int32, alpha: CGFloat = 1.0) {
        self.init(
            r: UInt8((value & 0xFF0000) >> 16),
            g: UInt8((value & 0x00FF00) >> 8),
            b: UInt8(value & 0x0000FF),
            alpha: alpha
        )
    }

    convenience init?(rgb: Int32, alpha: CGFloat = 1.0) {
        if rgb > 0xFFFFFF || rgb < 0 { return nil }
        self.init(rgbWithoutValidation: rgb, alpha: alpha)
    }

    convenience init?(hex: String, alpha: CGFloat = 1.0) {
        var charSet = CharacterSet.whitespacesAndNewlines
        charSet.insert("#")
        let _hex = hex.trimmingCharacters(in: charSet)
        guard _hex.range(of: "^[0-9A-Fa-f]{6}$", options: .regularExpression) != nil else { return nil }
        var rgb: UInt32 = 0
        Scanner(string: _hex).scanHexInt32(&rgb)
        self.init(rgbWithoutValidation: Int32(rgb), alpha: alpha)
    }
}

Usage

let alpha: CGFloat = 1.0

// Hex
print(UIColor(rgb: 0x4F9BF5) ?? "nil")
print(UIColor(rgb: 0x4F9BF5, alpha: alpha) ?? "nil")
print(UIColor(rgb: 5217269) ?? "nil")
print(UIColor(rgb: -5217269) ?? "nil")                  // = nil
print(UIColor(rgb: 0xFFFFFF1) ?? "nil")                 // = nil

// String
print(UIColor(hex: "4F9BF5") ?? "nil")
print(UIColor(hex: "4F9BF5", alpha: alpha) ?? "nil")
print(UIColor(hex: "#4F9BF5") ?? "nil")
print(UIColor(hex: "#4F9BF5", alpha: alpha) ?? "nil")
print(UIColor(hex: "#4F9BF56") ?? "nil")                // = nil
print(UIColor(hex: "#blabla") ?? "nil")                 // = nil

// RGB
print(UIColor(r: 79, g: 155, b: 245))
print(UIColor(r: 79, g: 155, b: 245, alpha: alpha))
//print(UIColor(r: 792, g: 155, b: 245, alpha: alpha))  // Compiler will throw an error, r,g,b = [0...255]
  • 2
    You don't need NSPredicate just to test regular expressions. string.range(of: pattern, options: .regularExpression) works too. – Sulthan Oct 7 '18 at 12:57
  • Thanks @Sulthan – Vasily Bodnarchuk Oct 7 '18 at 13:11
3

Here's a Swift extension on UIColor that takes a hex string:

import UIKit

extension UIColor {

    convenience init(hexString: String) {
        // Trim leading '#' if needed
        var cleanedHexString = hexString
        if hexString.hasPrefix("#") {
//            cleanedHexString = dropFirst(hexString) // Swift 1.2
            cleanedHexString = String(hexString.characters.dropFirst()) // Swift 2
        }

        // String -> UInt32
        var rgbValue: UInt32 = 0
        NSScanner(string: cleanedHexString).scanHexInt(&rgbValue)

        // UInt32 -> R,G,B
        let red = CGFloat((rgbValue >> 16) & 0xff) / 255.0
        let green = CGFloat((rgbValue >> 08) & 0xff) / 255.0
        let blue = CGFloat((rgbValue >> 00) & 0xff) / 255.0

        self.init(red: red, green: green, blue: blue, alpha: 1.0)
    }

}
  • 1
    what is drop drop first ? – Kishore Kumar Dec 22 '15 at 11:59
3
public static func hexStringToUIColor (hex:String) -> UIColor {
    var cString:String = hex.trimmingCharacters(in: .whitespacesAndNewlines).uppercased()

    if (cString.hasPrefix("#")) {
        cString.remove(at: cString.startIndex)
    }

    if ((cString.characters.count) == 6) {

        var rgbValue:UInt32 = 0
        Scanner(string: cString).scanHexInt32(&rgbValue)

        return UIColor(
            red: CGFloat((rgbValue & 0xFF0000) >> 16) / 255.0,
            green: CGFloat((rgbValue & 0x00FF00) >> 8) / 255.0,
            blue: CGFloat(rgbValue & 0x0000FF) / 255.0,
            alpha: CGFloat(1.0)
        )
    }else if ((cString.characters.count) == 8) {

        var rgbValue:UInt32 = 0
        Scanner(string: cString).scanHexInt32(&rgbValue)

        return UIColor(
            red: CGFloat((rgbValue & 0x00FF0000) >> 16) / 255.0,
            green: CGFloat((rgbValue & 0x0000FF00) >> 8) / 255.0,
            blue: CGFloat(rgbValue & 0x000000FF) / 255.0,
            alpha: CGFloat((rgbValue & 0xFF000000) >> 24) / 255.0
        )
    }else{
        return UIColor.gray
    }
}

How to use

var color: UIColor = hexStringToUIColor(hex: "#00ff00"); // Without transparency
var colorWithTransparency: UIColor = hexStringToUIColor(hex: "#dd00ff00"); // With transparency
3

I've merged a few ideas from this thread of answers and updated it to Swift 4.

extension UIColor {

  convenience init(hex: String, alpha: CGFloat = 1.0) {
    var cString:String = hex.trimmingCharacters(in: .whitespacesAndNewlines).uppercased()

    if (cString.hasPrefix("#")) { cString.removeFirst() }

    if ((cString.count) != 6) {
      self.init(hex: "ff0000") // return red color for wrong hex input
      return
    }

    var rgbValue: UInt32 = 0
    Scanner(string: cString).scanHexInt32(&rgbValue)

    self.init(red: CGFloat((rgbValue & 0xFF0000) >> 16) / 255.0,
              green: CGFloat((rgbValue & 0x00FF00) >> 8) / 255.0,
              blue: CGFloat(rgbValue & 0x0000FF) / 255.0,
              alpha: alpha)
  }

}

You can then use it like this:

UIColor(hex: "#ff0000") // with #
UIColor(hex: "ff0000")  // without #
UIColor(hex: "ff0000", alpha: 0.5) // using optional alpha value
0

Supporting 7 Hex color types

There are 7 hex color formats: ""#FF0000","0xFF0000", "FF0000", "F00", "red", 0x00FF00 , 16711935

NSColorParser.nsColor("#FF0000",1)//red nsColor
NSColorParser.nsColor("FF0",1)//red nsColor
NSColorParser.nsColor("0xFF0000",1)//red nsColor
NSColorParser.nsColor("#FF0000",1)//red nsColor
NSColorParser.nsColor("FF0000",1)//red nsColor
NSColorParser.nsColor(0xFF0000,1)//red nsColor
NSColorParser.nsColor(16711935,1)//red nsColor

CAUTION: This isn't a "one-file-solution", there are some dependencies, but hunting them down may be faster than researching this from scratch.

https://github.com/eonist/swift-utils/blob/2882002682c4d2a3dc7cb3045c45f66ed59d566d/geom/color/NSColorParser.swift

Permalink:
https://github.com/eonist/Element/wiki/Progress#supporting-7-hex-color-types

0

Swift 2.0

The code below is tested on xcode 7.2

import UIKit
extension UIColor{

    public convenience init?(colorCodeInHex: String, alpha: Float = 1.0){

        var filterColorCode:String =  colorCodeInHex.stringByReplacingOccurrencesOfString("#", withString: "")

        if  filterColorCode.characters.count != 6 {
            self.init(red: 0.0, green: 0.0, blue: 0.0, alpha: CGFloat(alpha))
            return
        }

        filterColorCode = filterColorCode.stringByTrimmingCharactersInSet(NSCharacterSet.whitespaceAndNewlineCharacterSet()).uppercaseString

        var range = Range(start: filterColorCode.startIndex.advancedBy(0), end: filterColorCode.startIndex.advancedBy(2))
        let rString = filterColorCode.substringWithRange(range)

        range = Range(start: filterColorCode.startIndex.advancedBy(2), end: filterColorCode.startIndex.advancedBy(4))
        let gString = filterColorCode.substringWithRange(range)


        range = Range(start: filterColorCode.startIndex.advancedBy(4), end: filterColorCode.startIndex.advancedBy(6))
        let bString = filterColorCode.substringWithRange(range)

        var r:CUnsignedInt = 0, g:CUnsignedInt = 0, b:CUnsignedInt = 0;
        NSScanner(string: rString).scanHexInt(&r)
        NSScanner(string: gString).scanHexInt(&g)
        NSScanner(string: bString).scanHexInt(&b)


        self.init(red: CGFloat(r) / 255.0, green: CGFloat(g) / 255.0, blue: CGFloat(b) / 255.0, alpha: CGFloat(alpha))
        return
    }
}
0

Swift 2.0:

Make an extension of UIColor.

extension UIColor {
    convenience init(hexString:String) {
        let hexString:NSString = hexString.stringByTrimmingCharactersInSet(NSCharacterSet.whitespaceAndNewlineCharacterSet())
        let scanner            = NSScanner(string: hexString as String)
        if (hexString.hasPrefix("#")) {
            scanner.scanLocation = 1
        }

        var color:UInt32 = 0
        scanner.scanHexInt(&color)

        let mask = 0x000000FF
        let r = Int(color >> 16) & mask
        let g = Int(color >> 8) & mask
        let b = Int(color) & mask

        let red   = CGFloat(r) / 255.0
        let green = CGFloat(g) / 255.0
        let blue  = CGFloat(b) / 255.0
        self.init(red:red, green:green, blue:blue, alpha:1)
    }

    func toHexString() -> String {
        var r:CGFloat = 0
        var g:CGFloat = 0
        var b:CGFloat = 0
        var a:CGFloat = 0
        getRed(&r, green: &g, blue: &b, alpha: &a)
        let rgb:Int = (Int)(r*255)<<16 | (Int)(g*255)<<8 | (Int)(b*255)<<0
        return NSString(format:"#%06x", rgb) as String
    }

}

Usage:

//Hex to Color
    let countPartColor =  UIColor(hexString: "E43038")

//Color to Hex
let colorHexString =  UIColor(red: 228, green: 48, blue: 56, alpha: 1.0).toHexString()
  • 1
    Please avoid posting duplicate answers. If a question is a duplicate, flag it as such instead of answering. Thank you. – ayaio Apr 15 '16 at 10:48
0

Swift 2.0:

In viewDidLoad()

 var viewColor:UIColor
    viewColor = UIColor()
    let colorInt:UInt
    colorInt = 0x000000
    viewColor = UIColorFromRGB(colorInt)
    self.View.backgroundColor=viewColor



func UIColorFromRGB(rgbValue: UInt) -> UIColor {
    return UIColor(
        red: CGFloat((rgbValue & 0xFF0000) >> 16) / 255.0,
        green: CGFloat((rgbValue & 0x00FF00) >> 8) / 255.0,
        blue: CGFloat(rgbValue & 0x0000FF) / 255.0,
        alpha: CGFloat(1.0)
    )
}
  • You saved my day, mate! – oskarko Jan 14 '17 at 23:03
0

For swift 3

extension String {
    var hexColor: UIColor {        
        let hex = trimmingCharacters(in: CharacterSet.alphanumerics.inverted)
        var int = UInt32()       
        Scanner(string: hex).scanHexInt32(&int)
        let a, r, g, b: UInt32
        switch hex.characters.count {
        case 3: // RGB (12-bit)
            (a, r, g, b) = (255, (int >> 8) * 17, (int >> 4 & 0xF) * 17, (int & 0xF) * 17)
        case 6: // RGB (24-bit)
            (a, r, g, b) = (255, int >> 16, int >> 8 & 0xFF, int & 0xFF)
        case 8: // ARGB (32-bit)
            (a, r, g, b) = (int >> 24, int >> 16 & 0xFF, int >> 8 & 0xFF, int & 0xFF)
        default:
            return .clear
        }
        return UIColor(red: CGFloat(r) / 255, green: CGFloat(g) / 255, blue: CGFloat(b) / 255, alpha: CGFloat(a) / 255)
    }
}
0

You can use this extension on UIColor which converts Your String (Hexadecimal , RGBA) to UIColor and vice versa.

extension UIColor {

  //Convert RGBA String to UIColor object
  //"rgbaString" must be separated by space "0.5 0.6 0.7 1.0" 50% of Red 60% of Green 70% of Blue Alpha 100%
  public convenience init?(rgbaString : String){
      self.init(ciColor: CIColor(string: rgbaString))
  }

  //Convert UIColor to RGBA String
  func toRGBAString()-> String {
    var r: CGFloat = 0
    var g: CGFloat = 0
    var b: CGFloat = 0
    var a: CGFloat = 0
    self.getRed(&r, green: &g, blue: &b, alpha: &a)
    return "\(r) \(g) \(b) \(a)"
  }

  //return UIColor from Hexadecimal Color string
  public convenience init?(hexString: String) {  
    let r, g, b, a: CGFloat

    if hexString.hasPrefix("#") {
      let start = hexString.index(hexString.startIndex, offsetBy: 1)
      let hexColor = hexString.substring(from: start)

      if hexColor.characters.count == 8 {
        let scanner = Scanner(string: hexColor)
        var hexNumber: UInt64 = 0

        if scanner.scanHexInt64(&hexNumber) {
          r = CGFloat((hexNumber & 0xff000000) >> 24) / 255
          g = CGFloat((hexNumber & 0x00ff0000) >> 16) / 255
          b = CGFloat((hexNumber & 0x0000ff00) >> 8) / 255
          a = CGFloat(hexNumber & 0x000000ff) / 255
          self.init(red: r, green: g, blue: b, alpha: a)
          return
        }
      }
    }

    return nil
  }

  // Convert UIColor to Hexadecimal String
  func toHexString() -> String {
    var r: CGFloat = 0
    var g: CGFloat = 0
    var b: CGFloat = 0
    var a: CGFloat = 0
    self.getRed(&r, green: &g, blue: &b, alpha: &a)
    return String(
        format: "%02X%02X%02X",
        Int(r * 0xff),
        Int(g * 0xff),
        Int(b * 0xff))
  }
}
  • Alpha is not supported in toHexString() – Womble Apr 4 '18 at 1:05
0

UIColor extension, This will greatly help you! (version:Swift 4.0)

import UIKit
extension UIColor {
/// rgb颜色
convenience init(r: CGFloat, g: CGFloat, b: CGFloat) {
    self.init(red: r/255.0 ,green: g/255.0 ,blue: b/255.0 ,alpha:1.0)
}

/// 纯色(用于灰色)
convenience init(gray: CGFloat) {
    self.init(red: gray/255.0 ,green: gray/255.0 ,blue: gray/255.0 ,alpha:1.0)
}
/// 随机色
class func randomCGColor() -> UIColor {
    return UIColor(r: CGFloat(arc4random_uniform(256)), g: CGFloat(arc4random_uniform(256)), b: CGFloat(arc4random_uniform(256)))
}

/// hex颜色-Int
convenience init(hex:Int, alpha:CGFloat = 1.0) {
    self.init(
        red:   CGFloat((hex & 0xFF0000) >> 16) / 255.0,
        green: CGFloat((hex & 0x00FF00) >> 8)  / 255.0,
        blue:  CGFloat((hex & 0x0000FF) >> 0)  / 255.0,
        alpha: alpha
    )
}
/// hex颜色-String
convenience init(hexString: String){
    var red:   CGFloat = 0.0
    var green: CGFloat = 0.0
    var blue:  CGFloat = 0.0
    var alpha: CGFloat = 1.0
    let scanner = Scanner(string: hexString)
    var hexValue: CUnsignedLongLong = 0
    if scanner.scanHexInt64(&hexValue) {
        switch (hexString.characters.count) {
        case 3:
            red   = CGFloat((hexValue & 0xF00) >> 8)       / 15.0
            green = CGFloat((hexValue & 0x0F0) >> 4)       / 15.0
            blue  = CGFloat(hexValue & 0x00F)              / 15.0
        case 4:
            red   = CGFloat((hexValue & 0xF000) >> 12)     / 15.0
            green = CGFloat((hexValue & 0x0F00) >> 8)      / 15.0
            blue  = CGFloat((hexValue & 0x00F0) >> 4)      / 15.0
            alpha = CGFloat(hexValue & 0x000F)             / 15.0
        case 6:
            red   = CGFloat((hexValue & 0xFF0000) >> 16)   / 255.0
            green = CGFloat((hexValue & 0x00FF00) >> 8)    / 255.0
            blue  = CGFloat(hexValue & 0x0000FF)           / 255.0
        case 8:
            alpha = CGFloat((hexValue & 0xFF000000) >> 24) / 255.0
            red   = CGFloat((hexValue & 0x00FF0000) >> 16) / 255.0
            green = CGFloat((hexValue & 0x0000FF00) >> 8)  / 255.0
            blue  = CGFloat(hexValue & 0x000000FF)         / 255.0
        default:
            log.info("Invalid RGB string, number of characters after '#' should be either 3, 4, 6 or 8")
        }
    } else {
        log.error("Scan hex error")
    }
    self.init(red:red, green:green, blue:blue, alpha:alpha)
}}
  • just a combination of the previous answers. – Sulthan Feb 23 '18 at 10:58
0

RGBA Version Swift 3/4

I like @Luca's answer as i think it's the most elegant.

However I don't want my colours specified in ARGB. I'd rather RGBA + also i needed to hack in the case of dealing with strings that specify 1 character for each of the channels "#FFFA".

This version also adds error throwing + strips the '#' character if it's included in the string. Here is my modified form for Swift.

public enum ColourParsingError: Error
{

    case invalidInput(String)
}
extension UIColor {
    public convenience init(hexString: String) throws
    {
        let hexString = hexString.replacingOccurrences(of: "#", with: "")
        let hex = hexString.trimmingCharacters(in:NSCharacterSet.alphanumerics.inverted)
        var int = UInt32()
        Scanner(string: hex).scanHexInt32(&int)
        let a, r, g, b: UInt32
        switch hex.count 
        {
        case 3: // RGB (12-bit)
            (r, g, b,a) = ((int >> 8) * 17, (int >> 4 & 0xF) * 17, (int & 0xF) * 17,255)
        //iCSS specification in the form of #F0FA
        case 4: // RGB (24-bit)
            (r, g, b,a) = ((int >> 12) * 17, (int >> 8 & 0xF) * 17, (int >> 4 & 0xF) * 17, (int & 0xF) * 17)
        case 6: // RGB (24-bit)
            (r, g, b, a) = (int >> 16, int >> 8 & 0xFF, int & 0xFF,255)
        case 8: // ARGB (32-bit)
            (r, g, b, a) = (int >> 24, int >> 16 & 0xFF, int >> 8 & 0xFF, int & 0xFF)
        default:
            throw ColourParsingError.invalidInput("String is not a valid hex colour string: \(hexString)")
        }
        self.init(red: CGFloat(r) / 255, green: CGFloat(g) / 255, blue: CGFloat(b) / 255, alpha: CGFloat(a) / 255)
    }
}
0

You can use it in swift 5

SWIFT 5

import UIKit

extension UIColor {
    static func hexStringToUIColor (hex:String) -> UIColor {
        var cString:String = hex.trimmingCharacters(in: .whitespacesAndNewlines).uppercased()

        if (cString.hasPrefix("#")) {
            cString.remove(at: cString.startIndex)
        }

        if ((cString.count) != 6) {
            return UIColor.gray
        }

        var rgbValue:UInt32 = 0
        Scanner(string: cString).scanHexInt32(&rgbValue)

        return UIColor(
            red: CGFloat((rgbValue & 0xFF0000) >> 16) / 255.0,
            green: CGFloat((rgbValue & 0x00FF00) >> 8) / 255.0,
            blue: CGFloat(rgbValue & 0x0000FF) / 255.0,
            alpha: CGFloat(1.0)
        )
    }
}
-1

Just some addiotion to the first answer

(haven't cehcked the alpha, may need to add an if netHext > 0xffffff):

extension UIColor {

struct COLORS_HEX {
    static let Primary = 0xffffff
    static let PrimaryDark = 0x000000
    static let Accent = 0xe89549
    static let AccentDark = 0xe27b2a
    static let TextWhiteSemiTransparent = 0x80ffffff
}

convenience init(red: Int, green: Int, blue: Int, alphaH: Int) {
    assert(red >= 0 && red <= 255, "Invalid red component")
    assert(green >= 0 && green <= 255, "Invalid green component")
    assert(blue >= 0 && blue <= 255, "Invalid blue component")
    assert(alphaH >= 0 && alphaH <= 255, "Invalid alpha component")

    self.init(red: CGFloat(red) / 255.0, green: CGFloat(green) / 255.0, blue: CGFloat(blue) / 255.0, alpha: CGFloat(alphaH) / 255.0)
}

convenience init(netHex:Int) {
    self.init(red:(netHex >> 16) & 0xff, green:(netHex >> 8) & 0xff, blue:netHex & 0xff, alphaH: (netHex >> 24) & 0xff)
}

}
-1

Swift 2.3: UIColor Extension. I Think its simpler.

extension UIColor {
    static func colorFromHex(hexString: String, alpha: CGFloat = 1) -> UIColor {
        //checking if hex has 7 characters or not including '#'
        if hexString.characters.count < 7 {
            return UIColor.whiteColor()
        }
        //string by removing hash
        let hexStringWithoutHash = hexString.substringFromIndex(hexString.startIndex.advancedBy(1))

        //I am extracting three parts of hex color Red (first 2 characters), Green (middle 2 characters), Blue (last two characters)
        let eachColor = [
            hexStringWithoutHash.substringWithRange(hexStringWithoutHash.startIndex...hexStringWithoutHash.startIndex.advancedBy(1)),
            hexStringWithoutHash.substringWithRange(hexStringWithoutHash.startIndex.advancedBy(2)...hexStringWithoutHash.startIndex.advancedBy(3)),
            hexStringWithoutHash.substringWithRange(hexStringWithoutHash.startIndex.advancedBy(4)...hexStringWithoutHash.startIndex.advancedBy(5))]

        let hexForEach = eachColor.map {CGFloat(Int($0, radix: 16) ?? 0)} //radix is base of numeric system you want to convert to, Hexadecimal has base 16

        //return the color by making color
        return UIColor(red: hexForEach[0] / 255, green: hexForEach[1] / 255, blue: hexForEach[2] / 255, alpha: alpha)
    }
}

Usage:

let color = UIColor.colorFromHex("#25ac09")
-1

Swift 3

extension UIColor {
    convenience init(r: Int, g: Int, b: Int, a: Int = 255) {
        self.init(red: CGFloat(r) / 255.0, green: CGFloat(g) / 255.0, blue: CGFloat(b) / 255.0, alpha: CGFloat(a) / 255.0)
    }

    convenience init(netHex:Int) {
        self.init(r:(netHex >> 16) & 0xff, g:(netHex >> 8) & 0xff, b:netHex & 0xff)
    }
}

Using:

self.view.backgroundColor = UIColor(netHex: 0x27ae60)
-1

Swift 4.0

use this Single line of method

override func viewDidLoad() {
    super.viewDidLoad()

   let color = UIColor(hexColor: "FF00A0")
   self.view.backgroundColor = color

}

You have to create new Class or use any controller where u need to use Hex color. This extension class provide you UIColor that will convert Hex to RGB color.

extension UIColor {
convenience init(hexColor: String) {
    let scannHex = Scanner(string: hexColor)
    var rgbValue: UInt64 = 0
    scannHex.scanLocation = 0
    scannHex.scanHexInt64(&rgbValue)
    let r = (rgbValue & 0xff0000) >> 16
    let g = (rgbValue & 0xff00) >> 8
    let b = rgbValue & 0xff
    self.init(
        red: CGFloat(r) / 0xff,
        green: CGFloat(g) / 0xff,
        blue: CGFloat(b) / 0xff, alpha: 1
    )
  }
}
  • Again, that unnecessary usage of strings. Also, you are just copying the other answers. – Sulthan Mar 14 '18 at 19:36
-2
extension UIColor {

      convenience init(hex: Int, alpha: Double = 1.0) {

      self.init(red: CGFloat((hex>>16)&0xFF)/255.0, green:CGFloat((hex>>8)&0xFF)/255.0, blue: CGFloat((hex)&0xFF)/255.0, alpha:  CGFloat(255 * alpha) / 255)
     }
}

Use this extension like:

let selectedColor = UIColor(hex: 0xFFFFFF)
let selectedColor = UIColor(hex: 0xFFFFFF, alpha: 0.5)
  • Utility classes are an antipattern in Swift. Swift has extensions. – Sulthan Mar 26 '17 at 10:17

protected by Sulthan Oct 19 '16 at 12:25

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