29

I created a project in Eclipse using the Spring Starter project template.

It automatically created an Application class file, and that path matches the path in the POM.xml file, so all is well. Here is the Application class:

@Configuration
@ComponentScan
@EnableAutoConfiguration
public class Application {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        //SpringApplication.run(ReconTool.class, args);  
        ReconTool.main(args);
    }
}

This is a command line app that I am building and in order to get it to run I had to comment out the SpringApplication.run line and just add the main method from my other class to run. Other than this quick jerry-rig, I can build it using Maven and it runs as a Spring application, sort of.

I'd rather, however, not have to comment out that line, and use the full Spring framework. How can I do this?

  • you mean you want to launch this app by maven instead of launching from IDE ? – Jigar Joshi Jun 17 '14 at 19:23
  • 2
    Your ReconTool is Spring application? Or maybe plain Java application? – MariuszS Jun 17 '14 at 19:40
47

You need to run Application.run() because this method starts whole Spring Framework. Code below integrates your main() with Spring Boot.

Application.java

@SpringBootApplication
public class Application {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        SpringApplication.run(Application.class, args);
    }
}

ReconTool.java

@Component
public class ReconTool implements CommandLineRunner {

    @Override
    public void run(String... args) throws Exception {
        main(args);
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        // Recon Logic
    }
}

Why not SpringApplication.run(ReconTool.class, args)

Because this way spring is not fully configured (no component scan etc.). Only bean defined in run() is created (ReconTool).

Example project: https://github.com/mariuszs/spring-run-magic

  • I think you meant: SpringApplication.run(ReconTool.class, args); – Alexander Mills Jun 17 '14 at 20:06
  • 1
    But you are true, SpringApplication.run(ReconTool.class, args) works too :) – MariuszS Jun 17 '14 at 20:10
  • 1
    I would rather leave SpringApplication.run(Application.class because this works, second solution looks too magic to me :) – MariuszS Jun 17 '14 at 20:17
  • 1
    Your solution works without @Component :) github.com/mariuszs/spring-run-magic – MariuszS Jun 17 '14 at 20:42
  • 1
    Nowadays, you could replace @Configuration, @ComponentScan and @EnableAutoConfiguration and use @SpringBootApplication instead – Villat Apr 10 at 23:03
11

Using:

@ComponentScan
@EnableAutoConfiguration
public class Application {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        SpringApplication.run(Application.class, args);  

        //do your ReconTool stuff
    }
}

will work in all circumstances. Whether you want to launch the application from the IDE, or the build tool.

Using maven just use mvn spring-boot:run

while in gradle it would be gradle bootRun

An alternative to adding code under the run method, is to have a Spring Bean that implements CommandLineRunner. That would look like:

@Component
public class ReconTool implements CommandLineRunner {

    @Override
    public void run(String... args) throws Exception {
       //implement your business logic here
    }
}

Check out this guide from Spring's official guide repository.

The full Spring Boot documentation can be found here

  • 1
    You steal all my ideas :) – MariuszS Jun 17 '14 at 19:53
  • 2
    It seams like we are thinking in parallel :) – geoand Jun 17 '14 at 19:53
0

One more way is to extend the application (as my application was to inherit and customize the parent). It invokes the parent and its commandlinerunner automatically.

@SpringBootApplication
public class ChildApplication extends ParentApplication{
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        SpringApplication.run(ChildApplication.class, args);
    }
}

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