1

I'm building a simple language parser, and having an issue with lower precedence prefix expressions. Here's an example grammar:

E = E5
E5 = E4 'OR' E4 | E4
E4 = E3 'AND' E3 | E3
E3 = 'NOT' E3 | E2
E2 = E1 '==' E1 | E1
E1 = '(' E ')' | 'true' | 'false'

However, this grammar doesn't work correctly for the NOT, if it's used as the RHS of a higher precedence infix operator, i.e.:

true == NOT false

This is due to the == operator requiring E1 on the RHS, which cannot be a NOT operation.

I'm unsure the correct way to express this grammar? Is it still possible using this simplistic recursive descent approach, or will I need to move to a more featured algorithm (shunting yard or precedence climbing).

  • Note that true == (NOT false) does parse, due to the explicit parenthesis rule that restarts the evaluation from the top level. – Chris Leishman Jun 18 '14 at 10:06
  • Maybe use polish notation? E = E5 E5 = 'OR' E4 E4 | E4 E4 = 'AND' E3 E3 | E3 E3 = 'NOT' E3 | E2 E2 = '==' E1 E1 | E1 E1 = '(' E ')' | 'true' | 'false' – user2746020 Jun 18 '14 at 10:56
  • If I understand correctly, you want not E == E to parse as though it were not (E == E), but E == not E to parse as though it were E == (not E). That's possible but weird. If that's actually what you want, please make it clearer in the question. – rici Jun 18 '14 at 15:32
  • It's definitely weird, but that's the only logically valid way to parse E == not E. – Chris Leishman Jun 20 '14 at 23:21
  • Note - I've clarified and extended in stackoverflow.com/questions/24337000 – Chris Leishman Jun 20 '14 at 23:22
1

Assuming the following input and expected parses are correct:

  1. test 1
    • input: true == NOT false
    • output: (true == (NOT false))
  2. test 2
    • input: NOT true == false
    • output: (NOT (true == false))
  3. test 3
    • input: NOT true == NOT false
    • output: (NOT (true == (NOT false)))

Here's an (ANTLR4) grammar that does the trick:

grammar Expr;

e : e5;
e5 : e4 'OR' e5 | e4;
e4 : e3 'AND' e4 | e3;
e3 : 'NOT' e3 | e2;
e2 : e1 '==' e3 | e1;
e1 : '(' e ')' | 'true' | 'false';

S : [ \t\r\n] -> skip;

Parses ANTLR created:

1

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2

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3

enter image description here

  • Nice summary, and nice graphs! I can see how that works, and it shows me that I over simplified the example - if there were multiple infix precedence levels higher than the NOT, this breaks down. I'll accept the answer, but I've also opened a new stackoverflow question with a more advanced example here: stackoverflow.com/questions/24337000 – Chris Leishman Jun 20 '14 at 23:19
0

Your language is also (unnecessarily) ambiguous. Fixing that helps you fix this problem, too.

Here, D is shorthand for "disjunction", C for conjunction, N for negation, and P for primary, E for equality.

D = C | C 'OR'  D
C = N | N 'AND' C
N = E |   'NOT' N
E = P | P '=='  P
P = '(' E ')' | 'true' | 'false'
  • 1
    In curiosity: how is it ambiguous? Your solution would help, except that it changes the precedence. == is supposed to bind more tightly than NOT, where instead you have reversed that. NOT 1==2 should parse as NOT(==(1, 2)), but yours will parse as ==((NOT 1), 2). – Chris Leishman Jun 19 '14 at 12:28
  • @ChrisLeishman: Yours is ambiguous when parsing true AND true AND true, it doesn't know how to group them. As for == binding more tightly, you can just fix that yourself... but I fixed it for you. Why the downvote? :( – user541686 Jun 19 '14 at 17:14
  • The downvote was because it changed the grammar to not be what I was after. But you fixed that now. However, the grammar you have now will not work E = P | P '==' P means that a 'NOT' term cannot exist on the RHS of '==' (only '(', 'true' or 'false'). – Chris Leishman Jun 20 '14 at 13:57
  • @ChrisLeishman: Do you have any guesses how to fix it yourself? – user541686 Jun 20 '14 at 17:47
  • If I did, I wouldn't be asking :) Other than to consider moving to a different algorithm (shunting yard or precedence climbing perhaps). – Chris Leishman Jun 21 '14 at 13:20
-2

Maybe use polish notation?

E = E5
E5 = 'OR' E4 E4 | E4
E4 = 'AND' E3 E3 | E3
E3 = 'NOT' E3 | E2
E2 = '==' E1 E1 | E1
E1 = '(' E ')' | 'true' | 'false'
  • 1
    That's not helpful for parsing the stated grammar. == is supposed to be infix. – Chris Leishman Jun 19 '14 at 12:26

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