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I am building a library to talk a third party's web service, which we connect to directly on an IP. The service is SSL secured, and we present a client certificate to identify us. The certificate they are presenting is self signed, I have the CA public key so that is fine, but their certificate's CN is an email address so it isn't treated as valid.

Is there anyway to verify only that the certificate is signed by the CA? I'm using Ruby if that's helpful, although I guess it's more an OpenSSL thing. The alternative is to not verify their certificate, but I'd obviously rather not do that.

(In case you are wondering, asking them to change the certificate or add a hostname isn't an option. This is enterprise :D)

  • "... but their certificate's CN is an email address so it isn't treated as valid" - Use the Subject Alternate Names (SAN), not the Common Name (CN). Putting a DNS name in the CN is deprecated by both the IETF and CA/B. So it sounds like they are doing the right thing if the DNS name is in the SAN. – jww Jun 18 '14 at 10:35
  • "...I'm using Ruby if that's helpful,..." - Ruby is kind of a disadvantage. Its kind of lame when it comes to SSL/TLS and PKI goodness. It does not expose enough of the stuff from OpenSSL. – jww Jun 18 '14 at 10:37
  • Can you provide the certificate details? You can use openssl x509 -in <cert> -inform PEM -text -noout. Paste the output in the question. – jww Jun 18 '14 at 10:38
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Only checking a CA and not the hostname provides as much security as not checking at all. E.g. if a CA issues google.com and the same CA issues attacker.com I could simply use the certificate for attacker.com to incorporate google.com if you don't check that the name in the certificate matches the target name.

If you know the expected peer certificate already and you just want to make sure that you connect to the host providing this certificate, it should be possible to just disable any built-in certificate verification and check the fingerprint of the certificate after the SSL connection got established. I don't know much ruby, but this would probably mean to use the peer_cert method to access the certificate and then to_pem or to_der to get a string representation, which you can use to compare against what you expect (or extract the public key for comparison).

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    "...and not the hostname provides as much security as not checking at". +1. Might as well uses Anonymous Diffie-Hellman (ADH) a do away with the security theater. – jww Jun 18 '14 at 22:14

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