207

I have a dataframe:

s1 = pd.Series([5, 6, 7])
s2 = pd.Series([7, 8, 9])

df = pd.DataFrame([list(s1), list(s2)],  columns =  ["A", "B", "C"])

   A  B  C
0  5  6  7
1  7  8  9

[2 rows x 3 columns]

and I need to add a first row [2, 3, 4] to get:

   A  B  C
0  2  3  4
1  5  6  7
2  7  8  9

I've tried append() and concat() functions but can't find the right way how to do that.

How to add/insert series to dataframe?

4
  • 6
    note that it's better to use s1.values as opposed to list(s1) as you will be creating an entirely new list using list(s1).
    – acushner
    Jun 18, 2014 at 13:56
  • 41
    I don't understand why everyone loves pandas so much when something that should be so simple is such a pain in the ass and so slow. Aug 2, 2017 at 9:27
  • 2
    @MattCochrane - Almost every time that I have found Pandas to be slow, I have found a different pandas method that is much faster later on or realised I was doing things weirdly backward. I find a lot of database functions like how you describe -I think that's due to the way database theory works, not down to Pandas specifically. I'm aware that there are other more specialised libraries that are faster for specific purposes, but few that do as much as broadly well as Pandas. If you / anyone has an alternate suggestion, I'd love to hear it! Aug 2, 2022 at 10:25
  • 2
    @ciaranhaines I find pandas and numpy being just bandaids for the fact that python being a (very slow) interpreted language. There's only a handful of 'optimized' building blocks that they provide, versus the infinite scope of potential problems I regularly face. I spend countless time finding the right combination of those primitives that would do what I need, and more often than not I figure out that there isn't one. I can write an unvectorized loop to do the same in a fraction of my time, but it will run slow. Python is good only as a prototyping language. Sep 8, 2022 at 15:06

18 Answers 18

228

Just assign row to a particular index, using loc:

 df.loc[-1] = [2, 3, 4]  # adding a row
 df.index = df.index + 1  # shifting index
 df = df.sort_index()  # sorting by index

And you get, as desired:

    A  B  C
 0  2  3  4
 1  5  6  7
 2  7  8  9

See in Pandas documentation Indexing: Setting with enlargement.

6
  • 2
    If you don't want to set with enlargement, but insert inside the dataframe, have a look at stackoverflow.com/questions/15888648/…
    – FooBar
    Jun 18, 2014 at 11:51
  • 7
    shifting index alternative: df.sort().reset_index(drop=True)
    – Meloun
    Jun 18, 2014 at 11:56
  • 5
    df.sort is deprecated, use df.sort_index()
    – GBGOLC
    Sep 20, 2017 at 13:30
  • 27
    I think df.loc[-1] = [2, 3, 4] # adding a row is a bit misleading, as -1 isn't the last row/element, as it is for Python arrays.
    – flow2k
    Apr 24, 2019 at 2:05
  • 3
    If you don't want to do any re-sorting of the index you can just do df.loc[len(df)] = [2,3,4]. Of course this makes assumption that the last index in the frame would be len(df)-1. However most of the dataframes I work with are structured like this.
    – Greg
    Nov 18, 2021 at 5:42
62

Not sure how you were calling concat() but it should work as long as both objects are of the same type. Maybe the issue is that you need to cast your second vector to a dataframe? Using the df that you defined the following works for me:

df2 = pd.DataFrame([[2,3,4]], columns=['A','B','C'])
pd.concat([df2, df])
4
  • 4
    Best answer ^ :) Mar 16, 2019 at 0:48
  • 3
    Should not be this modified a bit to do the job correctly? I think that code by @mgilbert inserts row at 0 but we end up with two rows having index 0. I think line two needs to be modified to look like the one below pd.concat([df2, df]).reset_index(drop=True) Mar 24, 2021 at 9:03
  • One problem is if the row that we want to be inserted is pd.Series due to iloc. The solution is to use iloc with double bracket as shown in my answer. Jul 31, 2022 at 7:45
  • @Thesmellofroses Or, better yet, pd.concat([df2, df], ignore_index=True) Dec 23, 2022 at 18:08
44

Testing a few answers it is clear that using pd.concat() is more efficient for large dataframes.

Comparing the performance using dict and list, the list is more efficient, but for small dataframes, using a dict should be no problem and somewhat more readable.


1st - pd.concat() + list

%%timeit
df = pd.DataFrame(columns=['a', 'b'])
for i in range(10000):
    df = pd.concat([pd.DataFrame([[1,2]], columns=df.columns), df], ignore_index=True)

4.88 s ± 47.1 ms per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 1 loop each)

2nd - pd.append() + dict

%%timeit

df = pd.DataFrame(columns=['a', 'b'])
for i in range(10000):
    df = df.append({'a': 1, 'b': 2}, ignore_index=True)

10.2 s ± 41.4 ms per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 1 loop each)

3rd - pd.DataFrame().loc + index operations

%%timeit
df = pd.DataFrame(columns=['a','b'])
for i in range(10000):
    df.loc[-1] = [1,2]
    df.index = df.index + 1
    df = df.sort_index()

17.5 s ± 37.3 ms per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 1 loop each)

1
32

One way to achieve this is

>>> pd.DataFrame(np.array([[2, 3, 4]]), columns=['A', 'B', 'C']).append(df, ignore_index=True)
Out[330]: 
   A  B  C
0  2  3  4
1  5  6  7
2  7  8  9

Generally, it's easiest to append dataframes, not series. In your case, since you want the new row to be "on top" (with starting id), and there is no function pd.prepend(), I first create the new dataframe and then append your old one.

ignore_index will ignore the old ongoing index in your dataframe and ensure that the first row actually starts with index 1 instead of restarting with index 0.

Typical Disclaimer: Cetero censeo ... appending rows is a quite inefficient operation. If you care about performance and can somehow ensure to first create a dataframe with the correct (longer) index and then just inserting the additional row into the dataframe, you should definitely do that. See:

>>> index = np.array([0, 1, 2])
>>> df2 = pd.DataFrame(columns=['A', 'B', 'C'], index=index)
>>> df2.loc[0:1] = [list(s1), list(s2)]
>>> df2
Out[336]: 
     A    B    C
0    5    6    7
1    7    8    9
2  NaN  NaN  NaN
>>> df2 = pd.DataFrame(columns=['A', 'B', 'C'], index=index)
>>> df2.loc[1:] = [list(s1), list(s2)]

So far, we have what you had as df:

>>> df2
Out[339]: 
     A    B    C
0  NaN  NaN  NaN
1    5    6    7
2    7    8    9

But now you can easily insert the row as follows. Since the space was preallocated, this is more efficient.

>>> df2.loc[0] = np.array([2, 3, 4])
>>> df2
Out[341]: 
   A  B  C
0  2  3  4
1  5  6  7
2  7  8  9
2
  • That's nice workarround solution, I was trying to insert series into dataframe. It's good enough for me at the moment.
    – Meloun
    Jun 18, 2014 at 11:43
  • I like most the last option. This truly matches what I really want to do. Thank you @FooBar!
    – Jade Cacho
    Dec 19, 2019 at 8:03
20

I put together a short function that allows for a little more flexibility when inserting a row:

def insert_row(idx, df, df_insert):
    dfA = df.iloc[:idx, ]
    dfB = df.iloc[idx:, ]

    df = dfA.append(df_insert).append(dfB).reset_index(drop = True)

    return df

which could be further shortened to:

def insert_row(idx, df, df_insert):
    return df.iloc[:idx, ].append(df_insert).append(df.iloc[idx:, ]).reset_index(drop = True)

Then you could use something like:

df = insert_row(2, df, df_new)

where 2 is the index position in df where you want to insert df_new.

1
  • 1
    Note that 2 is a positional index here, not index in ordinary pandas meaning. Dec 23, 2022 at 18:18
14

We can use numpy.insert. This has the advantage of flexibility. You only need to specify the index you want to insert to.

s1 = pd.Series([5, 6, 7])
s2 = pd.Series([7, 8, 9])

df = pd.DataFrame([list(s1), list(s2)],  columns =  ["A", "B", "C"])

pd.DataFrame(np.insert(df.values, 0, values=[2, 3, 4], axis=0))

    0   1   2
0   2   3   4
1   5   6   7
2   7   8   9

For np.insert(df.values, 0, values=[2, 3, 4], axis=0), 0 tells the function the place/index you want to place the new values.

1
  • 1
    Good solution for this example. Generally, you lose column names this way though
    – verwirrt
    Jun 23, 2022 at 10:08
13

It is pretty simple to add a row into a pandas DataFrame:

  1. Create a regular Python dictionary with the same columns names as your Dataframe;

  2. Use pandas.append() method and pass in the name of your dictionary, where .append() is a method on DataFrame instances;

  3. Add ignore_index=True right after your dictionary name.

3
  • 3
    This is probably the most preferable option (circa 2020). Jun 25, 2020 at 0:12
  • 3
    This function doesn't have an inplace argument, so: df = df.append(your_dict, ignore_index=True) Jan 15, 2021 at 21:12
  • 1
    append has been deprecated for a while now Jun 19, 2022 at 12:32
8

this might seem overly simple but its incredible that a simple insert new row function isn't built in. i've read a lot about appending a new df to the original, but i'm wondering if this would be faster.

df.loc[0] = [row1data, blah...]
i = len(df) + 1
df.loc[i] = [row2data, blah...]
3
  • Did you mean "appending a new df" or just "appending a new row", as your code shows?
    – smci
    Dec 11, 2019 at 6:52
  • sorry my sentence wasn't clear. i've read other people solutions that concat/append a whole new dataframe with just a single row. but in my solution its just a single row in the existing dataframe no need for an additional dataframe to be created Jan 15, 2020 at 19:15
  • OP wanted to insert a row at position 0. Your code overwrites whatever there is at position 0. Dec 23, 2022 at 18:23
7

Below would be the best way to insert a row into pandas dataframe without sorting and reseting an index:

import pandas as pd

df = pd.DataFrame(columns=['a','b','c'])

def insert(df, row):
    insert_loc = df.index.max()

    if pd.isna(insert_loc):
        df.loc[0] = row
    else:
        df.loc[insert_loc + 1] = row

insert(df,[2,3,4])
insert(df,[8,9,0])
print(df)
3
  • why would you say this is the best way?
    – Yuca
    Apr 12, 2019 at 16:44
  • 1
    then it would be nice to provide evidence to support that claim, did you time it?
    – Yuca
    Apr 15, 2019 at 11:42
  • 2
    you can use pd.isna to avoid importing numpy
    – kato2
    Jun 14, 2019 at 21:13
3

concat() seems to be a bit faster than last row insertion and reindexing. In case someone would wonder about the speed of two top approaches:

In [x]: %%timeit
     ...: df = pd.DataFrame(columns=['a','b'])
     ...: for i in range(10000):
     ...:     df.loc[-1] = [1,2]
     ...:     df.index = df.index + 1
     ...:     df = df.sort_index()

17.1 s ± 705 ms per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 1 loop each)

In [y]: %%timeit
     ...: df = pd.DataFrame(columns=['a', 'b'])
     ...: for i in range(10000):
     ...:     df = pd.concat([pd.DataFrame([[1,2]], columns=df.columns), df])

6.53 s ± 127 ms per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 1 loop each)

2

It just came up to me that maybe T attribute is a valid choice. Transpose, can get away from the somewhat misleading df.loc[-1] = [2, 3, 4] as @flow2k mentioned, and it is suitable for more universal situation such as you want to insert [2, 3, 4] before arbitrary row, which is hard for concat(),append() to achieve. And there's no need to bare the trouble defining and debugging a function.

a = df.T
a.insert(0,'anyName',value=[2,3,4])
# just give insert() any column name you want, we'll rename it.
a.rename(columns=dict(zip(a.columns,[i for i in range(a.shape[1])])),inplace=True)
# set inplace to a Boolean as you need.
df=a.T
df

    A   B   C
0   2   3   4
1   5   6   7
2   7   8   9

I guess this can partly explain @MattCochrane 's complaint about why pandas doesn't have a method to insert a row like insert() does.

1

For those that want to concat a row from the previous data frame, use double bracket ([[...]]) for iloc.

s1 = pd.Series([5, 6, 7])
s2 = pd.Series([7, 8, 9])

df = pd.DataFrame([list(s1), list(s2)],  columns =  ["A", "B", "C"])

#   A   B   C
# 0 5   6   7
# 1 7   8   9

pd.concat((df.iloc[[0]],  # [[...]] used to slice DataFrame as DataFrame
           df), ignore_index=True)

#   A   B   C
# 0 5   6   7
# 1 5   6   7
# 2 7   8   9

For duplicating or replicating arbitrary times, combine with star.

pd.concat((df.iloc[[0]],
           df,
           *[df.iloc[[1]]] * 4), ignore_index=True)

#   A   B   C
# 0 5   6   7
# 1 7   8   9
# 2 7   8   9
# 3 7   8   9
# 4 7   8   9
2
  • What's the benefit of using a nested concat here? Dec 23, 2022 at 18:12
  • @AntonyHatchkins apparently, there is none. You can remove the concat inside and it just works. I might be use that due to copy paste from the previous section. Might edit and delete that after testing to make sure. Dec 24, 2022 at 21:59
0

You can simply append the row to the end of the DataFrame, and then adjust the index.

For instance:

df = df.append(pd.DataFrame([[2,3,4]],columns=df.columns),ignore_index=True)
df.index = (df.index + 1) % len(df)
df = df.sort_index()

Or use concat as:

df = pd.concat([pd.DataFrame([[1,2,3,4,5,6]],columns=df.columns),df],ignore_index=True)
0

Do as following example:

a_row = pd.Series([1, 2])

df = pd.DataFrame([[3, 4], [5, 6]])

row_df = pd.DataFrame([a_row])

df = pd.concat([row_df, df], ignore_index=True)

and the result is:

   0  1
0  1  2
1  3  4
2  5  6
0

Create empty df with columns name:

df = pd.DataFrame(columns = ["A", "B", "C"])

Insert new row:

df.loc[len(df.index)] = [2, 3, 4]
df.loc[len(df.index)] = [5, 6, 7]
df.loc[len(df.index)] = [7, 8, 9]
0

Give the data structure of dataframe of pandas is a list of series (each series is a column), it is convenient to insert a column at any position. So one idea I came up with is to first transpose your data frame, insert a column, and transpose it back. You may also need to rename the index (row names), like this:

s1 = pd.Series([5, 6, 7])
s2 = pd.Series([7, 8, 9])

df = pd.DataFrame([list(s1), list(s2)],  columns =  ["A", "B", "C"])
df = df.transpose()
df.insert(0, 2, [2,3,4])
df = df.transpose()
df.index = [i for i in range(3)]
df

    A   B   C
0   2   3   4
1   5   6   7
2   7   8   9
0
s1 = pd.Series([5, 6, 7])
s2 = pd.Series([7, 8, 9])

df = pd.DataFrame([list(s1), list(s2)],  columns =  ["A", "B", "C"])

To insert a new row anywhere, you can specify the row position: row_pos = -1 for inserting at the top or row_pos = 0.5 for inserting between row 0 and row 1.

row_pos = -1
insert_row = [2,3,4]

df.loc[row_pos] = insert_row
df = df.sort_index()
df = df.reset_index(drop = True)

row_pos = -1

The outcome is:

    A   B   C
0   2   3   4
1   5   6   7
2   7   8   9

row_pos = 0.5

The outcome is:

    A   B   C
0   5   6   7
1   2   3   4
2   7   8   9
-3

The simplest way add a row in a pandas data frame is:

DataFrame.loc[ location of insertion ]= list( )

Example :

DF.loc[ 9 ] = [ ´Pepe’ , 33, ´Japan’ ]

NB: the length of your list should match that of the data frame.

0

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