I have a dataframe..

s1 = pd.Series([5, 6, 7])
s2 = pd.Series([7, 8, 9])

df = pd.DataFrame([list(s1), list(s2)],  columns =  ["A", "B", "C"])

   A  B  C
0  5  6  7
1  7  8  9

[2 rows x 3 columns]

and I need to add a first row [2, 3, 4] to get..

   A  B  C
0  2  3  4
1  5  6  7
2  7  8  9

I've tried append() and concat() functions but somehow I can't find the right way how to do that.

Any ideas? Is there any direct way how to add/insert series to dataframe?

  • 5
    note that it's better to use s1.values as opposed to list(s1) as you will be creating an entirely new list using list(s1). – acushner Jun 18 '14 at 13:56
  • 1
    I don't understand why everyone loves pandas so much when something that should be so simple is such a pain in the ass and so slow. – MattClimbs Aug 2 '17 at 9:27

Just assign row to a particular index, using loc:

 df.loc[-1] = [2, 3, 4]  # adding a row
 df.index = df.index + 1  # shifting index
 df = df.sort_index()  # sorting by index

And you get, as desired:

    A  B  C
 0  2  3  4
 1  5  6  7
 2  7  8  9

See in Pandas documentation Indexing: Setting with enlargement.

  • 2
    If you don't want to set with enlargement, but insert inside the dataframe, have a look at stackoverflow.com/questions/15888648/… – FooBar Jun 18 '14 at 11:51
  • 5
    shifting index alternative: df.sort().reset_index(drop=True) – Meloun Jun 18 '14 at 11:56
  • 1
    df.sort is deprecated, use df.sort_index() – GBGOLC Sep 20 '17 at 13:30
  • @Piotr - this works great, but what happens when you want to duplicate a row from your data frame, such as df.loc[-1] = df.iloc[[0]], and insert that? The frame comes with an added index column giving error ValueError: cannot set a row with mismatched columns (see stackoverflow.com/questions/47340571/…) – Growler Nov 16 '17 at 23:11

One way to achieve this is

>>> pd.DataFrame(np.array([[2, 3, 4]]), columns=['A', 'B', 'C']).append(df, ignore_index=True)
Out[330]: 
   A  B  C
0  2  3  4
1  5  6  7
2  7  8  9

Generally, it's easiest to append dataframes, not series. In your case, since you want the new row to be "on top" (with starting id), and there is no function pd.prepend(), I first create the new dataframe and then append your old one.

ignore_index will ignore the old ongoing index in your dataframe and ensure that the first row actually starts with index 1 instead of restarting with index 0.

Typical Disclaimer: Cetero censeo ... appending rows is a quite inefficient operation. If you care about performance and can somehow ensure to first create a dataframe with the correct (longer) index and then just inserting the additional row into the dataframe, you should definitely do that. See:

>>> index = np.array([0, 1, 2])
>>> df2 = pd.DataFrame(columns=['A', 'B', 'C'], index=index)
>>> df2.loc[0:1] = [list(s1), list(s2)]
>>> df2
Out[336]: 
     A    B    C
0    5    6    7
1    7    8    9
2  NaN  NaN  NaN
>>> df2 = pd.DataFrame(columns=['A', 'B', 'C'], index=index)
>>> df2.loc[1:] = [list(s1), list(s2)]

So far, we have what you had as df:

>>> df2
Out[339]: 
     A    B    C
0  NaN  NaN  NaN
1    5    6    7
2    7    8    9

But now you can easily insert the row as follows. Since the space was preallocated, this is more efficient.

>>> df2.loc[0] = np.array([2, 3, 4])
>>> df2
Out[341]: 
   A  B  C
0  2  3  4
1  5  6  7
2  7  8  9
  • That's nice workarround solution, I was trying to insert series into dataframe. It's good enough for me at the moment. – Meloun Jun 18 '14 at 11:43

Not sure how you were calling concat() but it should work as long as both objects are of the same type. Maybe the issue is that you need to cast your second vector to a dataframe? Using the df that you defined the following works for me.

>>>df2 = pd.DataFrame([[2,3,4]],columns=['A','B','C'])
>>>pd.concat([df2,df])

I put together a short function that allows for a little more flexibility when inserting a row:

def insert_row(idx, df, df_insert):
    dfA = df.iloc[:idx, ]
    dfB = df.iloc[idx:, ]

    df = dfA.append(df_insert).append(dfB).reset_index(drop = True)

    return df

which could be further shortened to:

def insert_row(idx, df, df_insert):
    return df.iloc[:idx, ].append(df_insert).append(df.iloc[idx:, ]).reset_index(drop = True)

Then you could use something like:

df = insert_row(2, df, df_new)

where 2 is the index position in df where you want to insert df_new.

We can use numpy.insert. This has the advantage of flexibility. You only need to specify the index you want to insert to.

s1 = pd.Series([5, 6, 7])
s2 = pd.Series([7, 8, 9])

df = pd.DataFrame([list(s1), list(s2)],  columns =  ["A", "B", "C"])

pd.DataFrame(np.insert(df.values, 0, values=[2, 3, 4], axis=0))

    0   1   2
0   2   3   4
1   5   6   7
2   7   8   9

For np.insert(df.values, 0, values=[2, 3, 4], axis=0), 0 tells the function the place/index you want to place the new values.

  • Can downvoter leave a comment? – Tai Oct 15 at 16:09

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