68

The official document of CMake 2.8.12 says about macro

When it is invoked, the commands recorded in the macro are first modified by replacing formal parameters (${arg1}) with the arguments passed, and then invoked as normal commands.

and about function

When it is invoked, the commands recorded in the function are first modified by replacing formal parameters (${arg1}) with the arguments passed, and then invoked as normal commands.

Obviously, two quotes are almost same but confusing me. Does replace parameters at first when calling a function just like macro?

  • 6
    There is at least one other important, albeit fairly obvious difference between function and macro: the semantics of return(): When used in a macro, you won't return from the macro but from the calling function. – Joachim W Sep 17 '15 at 16:06
73

I wrote a sample code below

set(var "ABC")

macro(Moo arg)
  message("arg = ${arg}")
  set(arg "abc")
  message("# After change the value of arg.")
  message("arg = ${arg}")
endmacro()
message("=== Call macro ===")
Moo(${var})

function(Foo arg)
  message("arg = ${arg}")
  set(arg "abc")
  message("# After change the value of arg.")
  message("arg = ${arg}")
endfunction()
message("=== Call function ===")
Foo(${var})

and the output is

=== Call macro ===
arg = ABC
# After change the value of arg.
arg = ABC
=== Call function ===
arg = ABC
# After change the value of arg.
arg = abc

So it seems arg is assigned the value of var when call Foo and ${arg} are just string replaced with ${var} when call Moo.

So I think the above two quotes are very easy to make one confuse although the official documents also said that

They are string replacements much like the C preprocessor would do with a macro. If you want true CMake variables and/or better CMake scope control you should look at the function command.

  • I've forgotten that, but I think it may be. – Shawn Xie Jun 11 '16 at 3:05
  • @EmileCormier, my question was about posting a question just to answer it immediately, not about asking, doing research and finally answering it. – robert Jun 8 '17 at 15:53
  • 1
    @robert Answering your own question immediately is permitted as per the Help Center (especially if it's a good, non-duplicate question of general interest to others). This is to help SO become a better knowledge base. Did you read the blog post linked in that Help Center topic? stackoverflow.blog/2011/07/01/… – Emile Cormier Jun 8 '17 at 17:47
  • 1
    @robert I'm just relaying what the founder of SO himself thinks about this practice. Take it up with him. ;-) – Emile Cormier Jun 9 '17 at 22:19
  • 1
    Running examples like this with cmake --trace-expand is enlightening – MarcH Jan 24 at 18:38
28

In other words, function pushes and pops new variable scope (variables created and changed exist only in the function), macro does not. However, you can override the function default behaviour with the PARENT_SCOPE parameter of the set command.

2

The cmake documentation you quoted is so misleading that it's basically wrong. It should be clarified/fixed like this:

  • macro: when it is invoked, the commands recorded in the macro are first all modified before any is run by replacing formal parameters (${arg1}) with the arguments passed.

cmake --trace-expand shows exactly what happens.

The cmake 3.13.3 doc hasn't changed compared to 2.8.12 with respect to this.

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