15

I have a matrix M with 16 rows and 12 columns and I want to split it into a array of 16 matrices, each with 4 rows and 3 columns. I can do it manually by:

M = matrix(sample(0:127,16*12,replace=TRUE), c(16,12))

ma1 = M[1:4,1:3]
ma2 = M[1:4,4:6]
ma3 = M[1:4,7:9]
ma4 = M[1:4,10:12]

ma5 = M[5:8,1:3]
ma6 = M[5:8,4:6]
.....

But how can I create a generic function matsplitter(M, r, c) which splits M into an array of matrices, each with r rows and c columns?

Thanks for your help.

6
  • So now you want the inverse of stackoverflow.com/questions/24287889/…?
    – MrFlick
    Jun 19 '14 at 5:14
  • Have you looked at array()? Jun 19 '14 at 5:32
  • @MrFlick: yes please. Looking forward to some more clever coding from you.
    – rnso
    Jun 19 '14 at 5:41
  • @RichardScriven: I tried array(M,c(4,3)) but it takes all numbers from first column of M only.
    – rnso
    Jun 19 '14 at 5:45
  • 1
    @rnso Ok. I tried my best just for you.
    – MrFlick
    Jun 19 '14 at 5:59
18

If you have a 16x12 array like this

mb <- structure(c("a1", "a2", "a3", "a4", "e1", "e2", "e3", "e4", "i1", 
"i2", "i3", "i4", "m1", "m2", "m3", "m4", "a5", "a6", "a7", "a8", 
"e5", "e6", "e7", "e8", "i5", "i6", "i7", "i8", "m5", "m6", "m7", 
"m8", "a9", "a10", "a11", "a12", "e9", "e10", "e11", "e12", "i9", 
"i10", "i11", "i12", "m9", "m10", "m11", "m12", "b1", "b2", "b3", 
"b4", "f1", "f2", "f3", "f4", "j1", "j2", "j3", "j4", "n1", "n2", 
"n3", "n4", "b5", "b6", "b7", "b8", "f5", "f6", "f7", "f8", "j5", 
"j6", "j7", "j8", "n5", "n6", "n7", "n8", "b9", "b10", "b11", 
"b12", "f9", "f10", "f11", "f12", "j9", "j10", "j11", "j12", 
"n9", "n10", "n11", "n12", "c1", "c2", "c3", "c4", "g1", "g2", 
"g3", "g4", "k1", "k2", "k3", "k4", "o1", "o2", "o3", "o4", "c5", 
"c6", "c7", "c8", "g5", "g6", "g7", "g8", "k5", "k6", "k7", "k8", 
"o5", "o6", "o7", "o8", "c9", "c10", "c11", "c12", "g9", "g10", 
"g11", "g12", "k9", "k10", "k11", "k12", "o9", "o10", "o11", 
"o12", "d1", "d2", "d3", "d4", "h1", "h2", "h3", "h4", "l1", 
"l2", "l3", "l4", "p1", "p2", "p3", "p4", "d5", "d6", "d7", "d8", 
"h5", "h6", "h7", "h8", "l5", "l6", "l7", "l8", "p5", "p6", "p7", 
"p8", "d9", "d10", "d11", "d12", "h9", "h10", "h11", "h12", "l9", 
"l10", "l11", "l12", "p9", "p10", "p11", "p12"), .Dim = c(16L, 
12L))

You can define matsplitter as

matsplitter<-function(M, r, c) {
    rg <- (row(M)-1)%/%r+1
    cg <- (col(M)-1)%/%c+1
    rci <- (rg-1)*max(cg) + cg
    N <- prod(dim(M))/r/c
    cv <- unlist(lapply(1:N, function(x) M[rci==x]))
    dim(cv)<-c(r,c,N)
    cv
} 

Then

matsplitter(mb,4,3)

will return (output clipped)

, , 1

     [,1] [,2] [,3] 
[1,] "a1" "a5" "a9" 
[2,] "a2" "a6" "a10"
[3,] "a3" "a7" "a11"
[4,] "a4" "a8" "a12"

, , 2

     [,1] [,2] [,3] 
[1,] "b1" "b5" "b9" 
[2,] "b2" "b6" "b10"
[3,] "b3" "b7" "b11"
[4,] "b4" "b8" "b12"

, , 3

     [,1] [,2] [,3] 
[1,] "c1" "c5" "c9" 
[2,] "c2" "c6" "c10"
[3,] "c3" "c7" "c11"
[4,] "c4" "c8" "c12"

...
0
9

Here is a function that uses Kronecker products to do the same thing. Why? Because I enjoy Kronecker products. The bonus here is that if your row and column values don't divide evenly into your input matrix then this function will pad out the smaller matrices at the right and bottom edges with NAs so you can still have an array output.

mat_split <- function(M, r, c){
  nr <- ceiling(nrow(M)/r)
  nc <- ceiling(ncol(M)/c)
  newM <- matrix(NA, nr*r, nc*c)
  newM[1:nrow(M), 1:ncol(M)] <- M

  div_k <- kronecker(matrix(seq_len(nr*nc), nr, byrow = TRUE), matrix(1, r, c))
  matlist <- split(newM, div_k)
  N <- length(matlist)
  mats <- unlist(matlist)
  dim(mats)<-c(r, c, N)
  return(mats)
}

So using the original example:

> M = matrix(sample(0:127,16*12,replace=TRUE), c(16,12))
> mat_split(M, 4, 3)
, , 1

     [,1] [,2] [,3]
[1,]  107   45  107
[2,]   49  119   32
[3,]   79  114   26
[4,]   71  104   16

, , 2

     [,1] [,2] [,3]
[1,]   79   77    4
[2,]   46   55   49
[3,]  122   15    0
[4,]   19   12   34

, , 3

     [,1] [,2] [,3]
[1,]  114   28   74
[2,]  116   28   84
[3,]   80   49   95
[4,]   41    6   82

, , 4

     [,1] [,2] [,3]
[1,]   17   17   13
[2,]  107   78   94
[3,]   22   16   14
[4,]  104   14  117
...

but if you do this:

mat_split(M, 4, 5)

you get:

, , 1

     [,1] [,2] [,3] [,4] [,5]
[1,]  107   45  107   79   77
[2,]   49  119   32   46   55
[3,]   79  114   26  122   15
[4,]   71  104   16   19   12

, , 2

     [,1] [,2] [,3] [,4] [,5]
[1,]    4  114   28   74   17
[2,]   49  116   28   84  107
[3,]    0   80   49   95   22
[4,]   34   41    6   82  104

, , 3

     [,1] [,2] [,3] [,4] [,5]
[1,]   17   13   NA   NA   NA
[2,]   78   94   NA   NA   NA
[3,]   16   14   NA   NA   NA
[4,]   14  117   NA   NA   NA

, , 4

     [,1] [,2] [,3] [,4] [,5]
[1,]  112   56   20   54   68
[2,]   59   37   30  110  126
[3,]   34   22  110   13   73
[4,]  116   57   48   77   41

...

Another useful addition might be to have the option to output as a list of matrices, instead of an array, which means you wouldn't have to pad with NAs.

1
  • This implementation is beautiful but can be slow when nrow(A) is big (> 10000), due to the evaluation of this line: matlist <- split(newM, div_k)
    – yliueagle
    Apr 4 '18 at 10:13
6

Answer using expand.grid, using a list of rows and columns to split by. Can generalise to splitting by differently sized column/row blocks.

M = matrix(sample(0:127,16*12,replace=TRUE), c(16,12))

split_matrix = function(M, list_of_rows,list_of_cols){
  temp = expand.grid(list_of_rows,list_of_cols)
  lapply(seq(nrow(temp)), function(i) {
  M[unlist(temp[i,1]),unlist(temp[i,2]) ]
  })
}

split_matrix(M,list(1:4,5:8,9:12,13:16),list(1:3,4:6,7:9,10:12))
4

Initial data

M = matrix(sample(0:127,16*12,replace=TRUE), c(16,12))


> M
      [,1] [,2] [,3] [,4] [,5] [,6] [,7] [,8] [,9] [,10] [,11] [,12]
 [1,]   46   46   64   54   48   78  125   38  103    43    15   125
 [2,]   75    9   10  119  108   29   13  104   51    74    83    86
 [3,]   52   22   97   12   44  115  118  111  114    56    31    36
 [4,]    1  116   70   27   61   22   36   34   16    62    20    23
 [5,]   32   61   11   46   34  120   50   71   44   105    52    81
 [6,]   88    1   60   75   68   85    0    0   66   125    52    65
 [7,]  119   32   75   14  119   57   74  107   21    32   110    39
 [8,]  103   70   18  127   32   44   14  103  118   120     0   119
 [9,]   12   99    0   48   31  126   92   78    9    11    52    21
[10,]   51   73   22   29   53   43   75  110   80    28    26    48
[11,]   64    5   81  127   25   59   50   21   46    87    66   122
[12,]   35    9   26  100    2   97   62  101    9    26    57    58
[13,]   90   16   70  118  122  120   50  125   26    34    54    55
[14,]   40   71   25   67   14   69   39   63  102     3    20   102
[15,]   51   66   92   19    7   53   33  123   50    78    83   111
[16,]   31   10   75   55  115   20   15  126   39   114   115    62

Split by columns

matrices_split_by_col = lapply(1:4, function(col){
  M[,((col-1)*3+1):((col-1)*3+3)]
})


> matrices_split_by_col[[1]]
      [,1] [,2] [,3]
 [1,]   46   46   64
 [2,]   75    9   10
 [3,]   52   22   97
 [4,]    1  116   70
 [5,]   32   61   11
 [6,]   88    1   60
 [7,]  119   32   75
 [8,]  103   70   18
 [9,]   12   99    0
[10,]   51   73   22
[11,]   64    5   81
[12,]   35    9   26
[13,]   90   16   70
[14,]   40   71   25
[15,]   51   66   92
[16,]   31   10   75

Now do two lapplies to split each column into rows

matrices_split_by_row = lapply(matrices_split_by_col, function(mat){

  lapply(1:4, function(row){
    mat[((row-1)*3+1):((row-1)*3+4),]
  })

})

Unlist the result:

matrices_split_by_row_and_col = unlist(matrices_split_by_row,recursive=FALSE)

Check result:

> matrices_split_by_row_and_col[[2]]
     [,1] [,2] [,3]
[1,]    1  116   70
[2,]   32   61   11
[3,]   88    1   60
[4,]  119   32   75

Oops, this gives the matrices going down the columns first, but anyway, you can modify the code and turn it into a function if you want, using the underlying logic.

4

Modification of @MrFlick's answer:

matsplitter<-function(M, r, c) {
  simplify2array(lapply(
    split(M, interaction((row(M)-1)%/%r+1,(col(M)-1)%/%c+1)),
    function(x) {dim(x) <- c(r,c); x;}
  ))
} 
1
  • Elegant improvement. We just return results in a slightly different order (I go along the top row of matrices first, this goes down the first column of matrices).
    – MrFlick
    Jun 19 '14 at 6:35
3

Using my limited regular programming knowledge, I came up with following code:

matsplitter = function(mat, submatr, submatc){
    matr = dim(mat)[1]
    matc = dim(mat)[2]
    mats_per_row=matc/submatc

    submat = array(NA, c(submatr,submatc,matr*matc/(submatr*submatc)))

    cur_submat=1; k=0
    i=j=a=b=1

    while(TRUE){
        submat[i,j,cur_submat+k] = mat[a,b]

        j=j+1
        if(j>submatc){j=1; k=k+1; if(k>(mats_per_row-1)){k=0; i=i+1; if(i>submatr){i=1;cur_submat=cur_submat+mats_per_row;}}}

        b=b+1
        if(b>matc){b=1;a=a+1; if(a>matr){break};}
    }
    submat
}
4
  • 3
    You deserve some credit for having the guts to at least try and put your code out there. Keep trying and you will get there!
    – Beaker
    Jan 5 '15 at 2:38
  • You should check the dates of posts. Thanks for reminding me about this post after so many months. Do you have a real solution?
    – rnso
    Jan 5 '15 at 3:39
  • No, it was just a compliment for taking the time to give it a shot. I was trying to find an answer here to my own question and found some use in parts of the code you posted.
    – Beaker
    Jan 5 '15 at 5:32
  • I just realized I forgot to upvote your post since it did give me some ideas that did help. Thanks!
    – Beaker
    Jan 5 '15 at 5:50
1

Here is another solution using split.data.frame:

matsplitter <- function(M, r, c) {
  splitMatrix <- function(mat, nrow) {
    split.data.frame(t(mat), ceiling(1:ncol(mat)/ncol(mat)*nrow))
  }
  sapply(splitMatrix(M, c), splitMatrix, r)
}

Then the function provides a matrix of lists:

res <- matsplitter(M, 4, 3)
res

  1          2          3
1 Integer,16 Integer,16 Integer,16
2 Integer,16 Integer,16 Integer,16
3 Integer,16 Integer,16 Integer,16
4 Integer,16 Integer,16 Integer,16

And you can subset any part of the matrix you want. For example the 2nd row 2nd column block:

res[2,2]
[[1]]
     [,1] [,2] [,3] [,4]
[1,]  116   93   73   53
[2,]   29   33   32   27
[3,]   29   57   89   96
[4,]   32   14   33   85

And this works with any specified dimensions, even when the number is not multiple of row/column length:

> matsplitter(M, 7, 7)
  1         2         3         4         5         6         7
1 Integer,2 Integer,4 Integer,4 Integer,2 Integer,4 Integer,4 Integer,4
2 Integer,2 Integer,4 Integer,4 Integer,2 Integer,4 Integer,4 Integer,4
3 Integer,2 Integer,4 Integer,4 Integer,2 Integer,4 Integer,4 Integer,4
4 Integer,3 Integer,6 Integer,6 Integer,3 Integer,6 Integer,6 Integer,6
5 Integer,2 Integer,4 Integer,4 Integer,2 Integer,4 Integer,4 Integer,4
6 Integer,2 Integer,4 Integer,4 Integer,2 Integer,4 Integer,4 Integer,4
7 Integer,3 Integer,6 Integer,6 Integer,3 Integer,6 Integer,6 Integer,6

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