35

I saw this example from php.net:

<?php
class MyClass {

     const MY_CONST = "yonder";

     public function __construct() {

          $c = get_class( $this );
          echo $c::MY_CONST;
     }
}

class ChildClass extends MyClass {

     const MY_CONST = "bar";
}

$x = new ChildClass(); // prints 'bar'
$y = new MyClass(); // prints 'yonder'
?>

But $c::MY_CONST is only recognized in version 5.3.0 or later. The class I'm writing may be distributed a lot.

Basically, I have defined a constant in ChildClass and one of the functions in MyClass (father class) needs to use the constant. Any idea?

89

How about using static::MY_CONST?

  • 1
    I do not get why people are getting to deep into OOP in other answers. Your solution is the only correct one and way simpler – Vladimir Hraban Jan 15 '14 at 10:26
  • 2
    There is something wrong about accessing a const by using the static keyword. Could you explain why that works? PHP Docs confused me in this as well. Thanks. – pavlindrom Jul 2 '14 at 15:26
  • 4
    @checksum: no, thats wrong – self::MY_CONST prints in both cases "yonder" – constant defined in child. Question was "How to access constant defined in child class from parent class functions?". – pevik Feb 22 '15 at 21:16
  • I'm super glad this works but I'm left scratching my head...why would it? Eh whatever my stuff works now. Thanks poster! – Dylan Pierce Jun 10 '15 at 19:25
  • 3
    Note about the implementation: self::MY_CONST is based on Late static bindings, released in PHP 5.3.0 (implemented in git Added support for Late Static Binding. (Dmitry, Etienne Kneuss)). Core implementation is in get_called_class(). PHP <= 5.2.x gives error Parse error: syntax error, unexpected T_STATIC. – pevik Dec 8 '15 at 20:06
13

Since php 5.3:

Use static::MY_CONST


More details on static

In this case the keyword static is a reference to the actually called class.

This illustrates the difference between static $var, static::$var and self::$var:

class Base {
    const VALUE = 'base';

    static function testSelf() {
        // Output is always 'base', because `self::` is always class Base
        return self::VALUE;
    }

    static function testStatic() {
        // Output is variable: `static::` is a reference to the called class.
        return static::VALUE;
    }
}

class Child extends Base {
    const VALUE = 'child';
}

echo Base::testStatic();  // output: base
echo Base::testSelf();    // output: base

echo Child::testStatic(); // output: child
echo Child::testSelf();   // output: base

Also note that the keyword static has 2 quite different meanings:

class StaticDemo {
    static function demo() {
        // Type 1: `static` defines a static variable.
        static $Var = 'bar';

        // Type 2: `static::` is a reference to the called class.
        return static::VALUE;
    }
}
  • 1
    great explanation – doz87 Aug 25 '18 at 13:20
  • Is it behaving the same when using static calls to static methods vs instanciating and calling object methods however? The "static" keyword in front of each method is concerning – NaturalBornCamper May 1 '19 at 12:46
  • @NaturalBornCamper there's no difference beterrn Child::testStatic() and $child::testStatic(). Though also $child->testStatic() works, you should stick to :: for static methods - using -> will throw a notice, and can be confusing for other developers – Philipp May 2 '19 at 7:44
4

Instead of

$c = get_class( $this );
echo $c::MY_CONST;

Do this

$c = get_class( $this );
echo constant($c . '::MY_CONST');
0

I couldn't get it to work with const as it prints "yonderyonder" (that's the thing about constants, they don't change), but it works fine with var:

<?php
class MyClass {

     var $MY_CONST = "yonder";

     public function __construct() {

     echo $this->MY_CONST;
     }
}

class ChildClass extends MyClass {

     var $MY_CONST = "bar";
}

$x = new ChildClass(); // prints 'bar'
$y = new MyClass(); // prints 'yonder'

?>
  • 2
    2015 - we don't need var – Herr Nentu' Dec 2 '15 at 9:45
  • 3
    Yeah, this response was written 5 years ago, where it was still a thing! – Cetra Dec 2 '15 at 22:44
0

If you need to access constants, properties, methods of classes or objects you can use reflection, it provides much more details about structure of the object.
example:

class MainClass
{
    const name = 'Primary';

    public $foo = 'Foo Variable';
}
class ExtendedClass extends MainClass
{
    const name = 'Extended';
}

/**
 * From Class Name
 */

//get reflection of main class
$mainReflection = new ReflectionClass('MainClass');

if($mainReflection->hasConstant('name'))
    var_dump($mainReflection->getConstant('name'));//Primary

//get reflection of extended class
$extendedReflection = new ReflectionClass('ExtendedClass');

if($extendedReflection->hasConstant('name'))
    var_dump($extendedReflection->getConstant('name'));//Extended

/**
 * From Objects
 */
$main = new MainClass();
$extended = new ExtendedClass();

//get reflection of main class
$mainReflection = new ReflectionObject($main);

if($mainReflection->hasConstant('name'))
    var_dump($mainReflection->getConstant('name'));//Primary

//get reflection of extended class
$extendedReflection = new ReflectionObject($extended);

if($extendedReflection->hasConstant('name'))
    var_dump($extendedReflection->getConstant('name'));//Extended

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