9

If I have a piece of code written in C# wrapped in an #if directive, what (if any) precedence is applied to any boolean operators that might be used in that directive?

In other words:

#if DEBUG || MYTEST && PLATFORM_WINDOWS
// ... Some code here
#endif

Will that be simply evaluated left to right as

#if (DEBUG || MYTEST) && PLATFORM_WINDOWS

And similarly, would

#if PLATFORM_WINDOWS && DEBUG || MYTEST

Be evaluated as

#if (PLATFORM_WINDOWS && DEBUG) || MYTEST

Or is there some precedence order for && vs ||?

Edit: To be clear, I am well aware that I can run the code myself to test it, and I have. I'm looking for an answer that gives me something official - a reference to documentation or the like, which can give me a deeper understanding of the underlying mechanics of directives. I'd like to know if there is a specifically intended behaviour or if this is purely something that is undefined.

17
  • 4
    IMO parenthesis should be used anyways, to avoid thinking overhead and such confusion Jun 20, 2014 at 18:02
  • 5
    Why not run some tests and tell us? This is something you could easily find out for yourself.
    – Bob Horn
    Jun 20, 2014 at 18:02
  • 2
    @BobHorn As far as I can tell from my tests, it is evaluated left to right. However, I'm looking for a more official answer (ideally something that points to some official documentation) to have a more complete understanding. My own tests are fine, but it would be nice to know if my findings are intended behaviour, or simply something undefined that just happens to work this way right now.
    – Blobinator
    Jun 20, 2014 at 18:05
  • 5
    You already have the code. You only need to execute it. Doing so would have taken you far less time than you've spent writing this question.
    – Servy
    Jun 20, 2014 at 18:07
  • 3
    @Mehrdad It's not a matter of figuring out what happens in my program, that's simple (and as mentioned above, I always add parens to clarify the order of evaluation anyway). I'm looking for something more official, to understand the underlying mechanics of directives better.
    – Blobinator
    Jun 20, 2014 at 18:07

4 Answers 4

13

2.5.2 Pre-processing expressions

Evaluation of a pre-processing expression always yields a boolean value. The rules of evaluation for a pre-processing expression are the same as those for a constant expression (§7.19), except that the only user-defined entities that can be referenced are conditional compilation symbols

7.19 Constant expressions

The compile-time evaluation of constant expressions uses the same rules as run-time evaluation of non-constant expressions*, except that where run-time evaluation would have thrown an exception, compile-time evaluation causes a compile-time error to occur.

So the same operator precedence applies to pre-processing expressions, constant expressions and runtime evaluation.

7.3.1 Operator precedence and associativity

(...)

7.11 Logical AND &

7.11 Logical XOR ^

7.11 Logical OR |

7.12 Conditional AND &&

7.12 Conditional OR ||

(...)

From highest to lowest precedence.

3
7

See 2.5.2 Pre-processing expressions in the C# Language Specification Version 5.0.

The specification doesn't talk about operator precedence, but it follows from the BNF grammar given in that section.

  1. Parentheses, constants (true, false) and conditional-symbols (PLATFORM_WINDOWS, DEBUG etc.)
  2. Unary !
  3. Equality ==, !=
  4. And &&
  5. Or ||

It also says:

When referenced in a pre-processing expression, a defined conditional compilation symbol has the boolean value true, and an undefined conditional compilation symbol has the boolean value false.

Evaluation of a pre-processing expression always yields a boolean value. The rules of evaluation for a pre-processing expression are the same as those for a constant expression (§7.19), except that the only user-defined entities that can be referenced are conditional compilation symbols.

1
  • Regarding the last paragraph of that citation, what it means in practical terms is that, while #if FOO == FOO is always be true, it's only because in this special case the condition ("FOO is (not) defined") will always equal the condition ("FOO is (not) defined"). To see that these "variables" don't have proper identities however, just consider that if "BAR" also happens to be "defined," then FOO == BAR is also true. Conversely, FOO != BAR prevails when the two are in opposite "defined" states, true/false or false/true. Mar 13, 2018 at 2:52
2

The precedence in preprocessor directives is the same as the usual precedence: && has a higher precedence than ||. To demonstrate this, run the following code:

#undef A
#define B
#define C
#if A && B || C
    Console.WriteLine(1);
#endif
#if (A && B) || C
    Console.WriteLine(2);
#endif
#if A && (B || C)
    Console.WriteLine(3);
#endif
#if B || C && A
    Console.WriteLine(4);
#endif
#if B || (C && A)
    Console.WriteLine(5);
#endif
#if (B || C) && A
    Console.WriteLine(6);
#endif

The output is:

1
2
4
5

Which shows that the parentheses are equivalent when they're around the &&, not the two items on the left.

0

I believe that the && operator has higher precedence than the || Operator in C# as shown here, http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa691323(v=vs.71).aspx.

So your code would then be evaluated :

#if DEBUG || MYTEST && PLATFORM_WINDOWS
// ... Some code here
#endif

would be evaluated as

#if (MYTEST && PLATFORM_WINDOWS) || DEBUG
// ... Some code here
#endif
2
  • This is true for C# expressions (and most every other language), but I have no been able to find a reference that explicitly states this holds true for C# preprocess conditionals. Showing an actual tested result would add evidence to the claim, finding an official reference/specification, even more so. Jun 20, 2014 at 18:12
  • @user2864740 That's exactly what the OP was asked to do in the comments against the question!
    – ClickRick
    Jun 20, 2014 at 18:15

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