33

How do I use the Comparable protocol in Swift? In the declaration it says I'd have to implement the three operations <, <= and >=. I put all those in the class but it doesn't work. Also do I need to have all three of them? Because it should be possible to deduce all of them from a single one.

58

The Comparable protocol extends the Equatable protocol -> implement both of them

In Apple's Reference is an example from Apple (within the Comparable protocol reference) you can see how you should do it: Don't put the operation implementations within the class, but rather on the outside/global scope. Also you only have to implement the < operator from Comparable protocol and == from Equatable protocol.

Correct example:

class Person : Comparable {
    let name : String

    init(name : String) {
        self.name = name
    }
}

func < (lhs: Person, rhs: Person) -> Bool {
    return lhs.name < rhs.name
}

func == (lhs: Person, rhs: Person) -> Bool {
    return lhs.name == rhs.name
}

let paul = Person(name: "Paul")
let otherPaul = Person(name: "Paul")
let ben = Person(name: "Ben")

paul > otherPaul  // false
paul <= ben       // false
paul == otherPaul // true
  • How do I do this in playground? – Van Du Tran Nov 16 '14 at 22:59
  • 2
    I don't get how this is considered 'implemented' when the actual code isn't in the class at all... Shouldn't the == < and all the rest be inside the class? Yet when I try that I get errors.. Do you know what I'm failing to understand? – fjlksahfob Nov 26 '14 at 15:06
  • 5
    @fjlksahfob the reason is because it's adding an extension to the operator at a scope outside the class. You could even do something like func == (lhs: ClassA, rhs: ClassB) -> Bool if you wanted, to compare two different classes (from testing it appears to only work in the direction specified, so you would also have to create func == (lhs: ClassB, rhs: ClassA) -> Bool). In other words, the Swift compiler interprets (X == Y) as ==(X, Y) and not X.==(Y) – Oliver Mar 17 '15 at 4:31
  • @oliver makes sense, thanks! – fjlksahfob Mar 17 '15 at 16:08
  • 1
    @Kametrixom, oh, cool, I haven't used Haskell, so I don't know, thanks for enlightening me. And C# does have custom operator overloading, but for sorting you use the IComparable interface, and compare by doing a.CompareTo(b) < 0, which means a < b. Why not just Make IComparable have the < operator instead? That was my point. Swift looks nice. – Pavel Jul 20 '15 at 10:31
3

Update for Swift 3 for Kametrixom answer

class Person : Comparable {
let name : String

init(name : String) {
    self.name = name
}


static func < (lhs: Person, rhs: Person) -> Bool {
    return lhs.name < rhs.name
}

static func == (lhs: Person, rhs: Person) -> Bool {
    return lhs.name == rhs.name
}

}

// then call from some other place

let paul = Person(name: "Paul")
let otherPaul = Person(name: "Paul")
let ben = Person(name: "Ben")

print(paul > otherPaul)  // false
print(paul <= ben)       // false
print(paul == otherPaul) // true

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.