80

What is the way of printing "Foo" here? In this example, what prints is "string".

http://play.golang.org/p/ZnK6PRwEPp

type A struct {
    Foo string
}

func (a *A) PrintFoo() {
    fmt.Println("Foo value is " + a.Foo)
}

func main() {
    a := &A{Foo: "afoo"}
    val := reflect.Indirect(reflect.ValueOf(a))
    fmt.Println(val.Field(0).Type().Name())
}

7 Answers 7

86

You want val.Type().Field(0).Name. The Field method on reflect.Type will return a struct describing that field, which includes the name, among other information.

There is no way to retrieve the field name for a reflect.Value representing a particular field value, since that is a property of the containing struct.

8
  • "There is no way to retrieve the field name for a reflect.Value representing a particular field value" - Why is that the case? Isn't the type and name part of the field itself?
    – sat
    Jun 21, 2014 at 0:57
  • @sat As soon as you have the reflect.Value of a specific field, it is no different to any other variable. Only the struct has the information about it's fields.
    – nemo
    Jun 21, 2014 at 1:06
  • 1
    @sat: in your example, val.Field(0) is no different to a reflect.Value for any other string. It doesn't "remember" that it was part of a struct. Jun 21, 2014 at 1:10
  • @JamesHenstridge - But I don't really need it to remember that it belongs to a struct. All I was trying to print was the name of the variable from the field itself using reflection (whether its part of a struct or not). Sorry if its really a newbie question
    – sat
    Jun 21, 2014 at 1:30
  • That's the thing: the variable doesn't have a name -- its just a location in memory. Jun 21, 2014 at 1:34
32

You need to Get the Field of the Type Definition not of the Value.

http://play.golang.org/p/7Bc7MJikbJ

package main

import "fmt"
import "reflect"

type A struct {
    Foo string
}

func (a *A) PrintFoo() {
    fmt.Println("Foo value is " + a.Foo)
}

func main() {
    a := &A{Foo: "afoo"}
    val := reflect.Indirect(reflect.ValueOf(a))
    fmt.Println(val.Type().Field(0).Name)
}
1
  • 1
    Nice example but your answer lacks an explanation.
    – nemo
    Jun 21, 2014 at 1:06
32

I think the better way to get the fields' name in the struct is

func main() {
    a := &A{Foo: "afoo"}
    val := reflect.ValueOf(a).Elem()
    for i:=0; i<val.NumField();i++{
        fmt.Println(val.Type().Field(i).Name)
    }
}

There are two tips:

  1. use .Elem() after you reflect.ValueOf(a), because in your case, a is a pointer.
  2. val.Field(i).Type().Name is totally different from val.Type().Field(i).Name. The latter one can get the name of the field in the struct

Hope that it is helpful..

If you want to have a look at more cases, please check my 2mins article

28

With the new Names method of the structs package it's even more easier:

package main

import (
    "fmt"

    "github.com/fatih/structs"
)

type A struct {
    Foo string
    Bar int
}

func main() {
    names := structs.Names(&A{})
    fmt.Println(names) // ["Foo", "Bar"]
}
4
  • 43
    You should probably mention that it's your own package.
    – kovac
    Feb 24, 2019 at 11:33
  • @swdon When Fatih Arslan build a lib it's almost as it was the standard library. Feb 18, 2020 at 9:12
  • 1
    Mention that's my own package? The package name itself already has my name, I'm not sure how else I can tell that :) Apr 7, 2020 at 17:12
  • 2
    this package is no longer maintained
    – lev
    Nov 19, 2020 at 14:18
2

You can also use https://github.com/fatih/structs

// Convert the fields of a struct to a []*Field
fields := s.Fields()

for _, f := range fields {
    fmt.Printf("field name: %+v\n", f.Name())
}
2
package main

import "fmt"
import "reflect"

type A struct {
    Foo string
}

func (a *A) PrintFoo() {
    fmt.Println("Foo value is " + a.Foo)
}

func main() {
    a := &A{Foo: "afoo"}

    //long and bored code
    t := reflect.TypeOf(*a)
    if t.Kind() == reflect.Struct {
        for i := 0; i < t.NumField(); i++ {
            fmt.Println(t.Field(i).Name)
        }
    } else {
        fmt.Println("not a stuct")
    }

    //shorthanded call
    fmt.Println(reflect.TypeOf(*a).Field(0).Name)//can panic if no field exists

}
1

You can use this function, which takes the struct as the first parameter, and then its fields. It returns the map type, which is convenient to use

If you use fields from another structure, nothing will happen

If you try to use a different type, it will cause panic

Note that the field has an ordinal number according to the list (starting from 0). All fields in the structure must start with uppercase

func GetStructFieldName(Struct interface{}, StructField ...interface{}) (fields map[int]string) {
    fields = make(map[int]string)
    s := reflect.ValueOf(Struct).Elem()

    for r := range StructField {
        f := reflect.ValueOf(StructField[r]).Elem()

        for i := 0; i < s.NumField(); i++ {
            valueField := s.Field(i)
            if valueField.Addr().Interface() == f.Addr().Interface() {
                fields[i] = s.Type().Field(i).Name
            }
        }
    }
    return fields
}

Full example and playground

package main

import (
    "fmt"
    "reflect"
)

type Example struct {
    Apple bool
    Pear  int
}

func GetStructFieldName(Struct interface{}, StructField ...interface{}) (fields map[int]string) {
    fields = make(map[int]string)

    for r := range StructField {
        s := reflect.ValueOf(Struct).Elem()
        f := reflect.ValueOf(StructField[r]).Elem()

        for i := 0; i < s.NumField(); i++ {
            valueField := s.Field(i)
            if valueField.Addr().Interface() == f.Addr().Interface() {
                fields[i] = s.Type().Field(i).Name
            }
        }
    }
    return fields
}

func main() {
    e := Example{}

    names := GetStructFieldName(&e, &e.Apple, &e.Pear)

    fmt.Println(names)
    fmt.Println(names[0], names[1])

    for i := range names {
        fmt.Println(names[i])
    }

    /* Output:
    map[0:Apple 1:Pear]
    Apple Pear
    Apple
    Pear
    */
}

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