125

Say I want to init a UIView subclass with a String and an Int.

How would I do this in Swift if I'm just subclassing UIView? If I just make a custom init() function but the parameters are a String and an Int, it tells me that "super.init() isn't called before returning from initializer".

And if I call super.init() I'm told I must use a designated initializer. What should I be using there? The frame version? The coder version? Both? Why?

207

The init(frame:) version is the default initializer. You must call it only after initializing your instance variables. If this view is being reconstituted from a Nib then your custom initializer will not be called, and instead the init?(coder:) version will be called. Since Swift now requires an implementation of the required init?(coder:), I have updated the example below and changed the let variable declarations to var and optional. In this case, you would initialize them in awakeFromNib() or at some later time.

class TestView : UIView {
    var s: String?
    var i: Int?
    init(s: String, i: Int) {
        self.s = s
        self.i = i
        super.init(frame: CGRect(x: 0, y: 0, width: 100, height: 100))
    }

    required init?(coder aDecoder: NSCoder) {
        super.init(coder: aDecoder)
    }
}
| improve this answer | |
  • 5
    Then by all means make them var. But the default best practice in Swift is to declare variables let unless there is a reason to declare them var. There was no such reason to do so in my code example above, hence let. – Wolf McNally Jun 24 '14 at 14:27
  • 2
    This code doesn't compile. You need to implement the required initialiser init(coder:). – Decade Moon Nov 29 '14 at 0:24
  • 3
    interesting how this compiled years ago. Nowadays it complains under init(coder:) that "Property self.s not initialized at super.init call" – mafiOSo Apr 11 '17 at 6:20
  • Fixed example for Swift 3.1. Compiles under a playground importing UIKit. – Wolf McNally Apr 13 '17 at 20:41
  • 1
    @LightNight I made s and i Optional to keep things simple here. If they were not optional, they would also need to be initialized in the required initializer. Making them optional means they get to be nil when super.init() is called. If they weren't optional, they would indeed need to be assigned before calling super.init(). – Wolf McNally Aug 24 '17 at 18:33
33

I create a common init for the designated and required. For convenience inits I delegate to init(frame:) with frame of zero.

Having zero frame is not a problem because typically the view is inside a ViewController's view; your custom view will get a good, safe chance to layout its subviews when its superview calls layoutSubviews() or updateConstraints(). These two functions are called by the system recursively throughout the view hierarchy. You can use either updateContstraints() or layoutSubviews(). updateContstraints() is called first, then layoutSubviews(). In updateConstraints() make sure to call super last. In layoutSubviews(), call super first.

Here's what I do:

@IBDesignable
class MyView: UIView {

      convenience init(args: Whatever) {
          self.init(frame: CGRect.zero)
          //assign custom vars
      }

      override init(frame: CGRect) {
           super.init(frame: frame)
           commonInit()
      }

      required init?(coder aDecoder: NSCoder) {
           super.init(coder: aDecoder)
           commonInit()
      }

      override func prepareForInterfaceBuilder() {
           super.prepareForInterfaceBuilder()
           commonInit()
      }

      private func commonInit() {
           //custom initialization
      }

      override func updateConstraints() {
           //set subview constraints here
           super.updateConstraints()
      }

      override func layoutSubviews() {
           super.layoutSubviews()
           //manually set subview frames here
      }

}
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    It shouldn't work: Use of 'self' in method call 'commonInit' before super.init initializes self – surfrider Aug 11 '17 at 11:13
  • 1
    Initialize custom arguments after self.init call. Updated my answer. – MH175 Aug 11 '17 at 14:40
  • 1
    But what if you want to initialise some properties in commonInit method, but you can't place it after super in this case because you should initialise all properties BEFORE super call. Lol it seems like dead loop. – surfrider Aug 11 '17 at 16:11
  • 1
    This is how Swift initialization often works: search for "two-phase initialization". You can use implicitly unwrapped optionals, but I recommend against it. Your architecture, especially when dealing with views, should initialize all local properties. I've used this commonInit() method to hundreds of views now. It works – MH175 Jul 21 '18 at 19:48
17

Here is how I do it on iOS 9 in Swift -

import UIKit

class CustomView : UIView {

    init() {
        super.init(frame: UIScreen.mainScreen().bounds);

        //for debug validation
        self.backgroundColor = UIColor.blueColor();
        print("My Custom Init");

        return;
    }

    required init?(coder aDecoder: NSCoder) { fatalError("init(coder:) has not been implemented"); }
}

Here is a full project with example:

| improve this answer | |
  • 2
    this would use the whole display for the View – RaptoX Aug 4 '16 at 14:03
  • 1
    yep! If interested in a partial subview, let me know and I'll post this as well – J-Dizzle Aug 5 '16 at 17:51
  • 1
    I like this answer the best, because having the fatalError means I don't have to put any code in the required init. – Carter Medlin Aug 16 '16 at 21:15
  • 1
    @J-Dizzle, I'd like to see the solution for partial views. – Ari Lacenski Sep 29 '16 at 2:17
  • isn't your answer saying the opposite of the accepted answer? I mean you're doing the customization after super.init, but he said it should be done before super.init... – Honey May 16 '17 at 20:43
11

Here is how I do a Subview on iOS in Swift -

class CustomSubview : UIView {

    init() {
        super.init(frame: UIScreen.mainScreen().bounds);

        let windowHeight : CGFloat = 150;
        let windowWidth  : CGFloat = 360;

        self.backgroundColor = UIColor.whiteColor();
        self.frame = CGRectMake(0, 0, windowWidth, windowHeight);
        self.center = CGPoint(x: UIScreen.mainScreen().bounds.width/2, y: 375);

        //for debug validation
        self.backgroundColor = UIColor.grayColor();
        print("My Custom Init");

        return;
    }

    required init?(coder aDecoder: NSCoder) { fatalError("init(coder:) has not been implemented"); }
}
| improve this answer | |
  • 4
    Nice use of the fatalError() call. I was having to use optionals just to silence warnings from an initializer that wasn't even being used. This shut it right up! Thanks. – Mike Critchley Dec 17 '17 at 13:21

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