109

Can any one tell me what is a the best way to convert a multipart file (org.springframework.web.multipart.MultipartFile) to File (java.io.File) ?

In my spring mvc web project i'm getting uploaded file as Multipart file.I have to convert it to a File(io) ,there fore I can call this image storing service(Cloudinary).They only take type (File).

I have done so many searches but failed.If anybody knows a good standard way please let me know? Thnx

1
  • 6
    Is there something that prevents you from using the method MultipartFile.transferTo()?
    – fajarkoe
    Jun 21, 2014 at 9:06

11 Answers 11

205

You can get the content of a MultipartFile by using the getBytes method and you can write to the file using Files.newOutputStream():

public void write(MultipartFile file, Path dir) {
    Path filepath = Paths.get(dir.toString(), file.getOriginalFilename());

    try (OutputStream os = Files.newOutputStream(filepath)) {
        os.write(file.getBytes());
    }
}

You can also use the transferTo method:

public void multipartFileToFile(
    MultipartFile multipart, 
    Path dir
) throws IOException {
    Path filepath = Paths.get(dir.toString(), multipart.getOriginalFilename());
    multipart.transferTo(filepath);
}
6
  • 7
    I used transferTo Function but I feel there is an issue. like It keeps temp file to drive for local machine.
    – Morez
    Jun 15, 2015 at 14:57
  • @Ronnie I am having the same issue. Have you found any workaround? Apr 19, 2016 at 12:22
  • 1
    org.apache.commons.io.FileUtils.deleteQuietly(convFile.getParentFile()); , this should delete the temp file @Ronnie
    – kavinder
    Apr 29, 2016 at 10:45
  • 5
    createNewFIle() is both pointless and wasteful here. You are now obliging new FileOutputStream() (via the OS) to both delete the file so created and create a new one.
    – user207421
    Sep 6, 2016 at 1:14
  • @Petros Tsialiamanis Does it have any File conversion size limit in Java. Let's say I am using 3GB of file.
    – Rohit
    May 10, 2018 at 12:39
21

small correction on @PetrosTsialiamanis post , new File( multipart.getOriginalFilename()) this will create file in server location where sometime you will face write permission issues for the user, its not always possible to give write permission to every user who perform action. System.getProperty("java.io.tmpdir") will create temp directory where your file will be created properly. This way you are creating temp folder, where file gets created , later on you can delete file or temp folder.

public  static File multipartToFile(MultipartFile multipart, String fileName) throws IllegalStateException, IOException {
    File convFile = new File(System.getProperty("java.io.tmpdir")+"/"+fileName);
    multipart.transferTo(convFile);
    return convFile;
}

put this method in ur common utility and use it like for eg. Utility.multipartToFile(...)

3
  • 1
    this should be the right answer (especially for using the tmp directory, because it will solve some issue like permission denied in linux) Dec 24, 2020 at 17:57
  • @HoussemBadri yes, considering permission issues, etc this is required.
    – Swadeshi
    Jun 25, 2021 at 7:30
  • Linux User here, Only this solution worked for me. 2021. thanks
    – gdogra
    Jul 28, 2021 at 1:30
20

Although the accepted answer is correct but if you are just trying to upload your image to cloudinary, there's a better way:

Map upload = cloudinary.uploader().upload(multipartFile.getBytes(), ObjectUtils.emptyMap());

Where multipartFile is your org.springframework.web.multipart.MultipartFile.

1
  • For some reason cloudinary returns RuntimeException: Missing required parameter - file when I give the upload() method byte[] as file param. So annoying.
    – moze
    Jul 31 at 12:53
13
private File convertMultiPartToFile(MultipartFile file ) throws IOException {
    File convFile = new File( file.getOriginalFilename() );
    FileOutputStream fos = new FileOutputStream( convFile );
    fos.write( file.getBytes() );
    fos.close();
    return convFile;
}
1
  • giving this exception java.io.FileNotFoundException: multipdf.pdf (Permission denied) May 7, 2019 at 13:39
12

MultipartFile.transferTo(File) is nice, but don't forget to clean the temp file after all.

// ask JVM to ask operating system to create temp file
File tempFile = File.createTempFile(TEMP_FILE_PREFIX, TEMP_FILE_POSTFIX);

// ask JVM to delete it upon JVM exit if you forgot / can't delete due exception
tempFile.deleteOnExit();

// transfer MultipartFile to File
multipartFile.transferTo(tempFile);

// do business logic here
result = businessLogic(tempFile);

// tidy up
tempFile.delete();

Check out Razzlero's comment about File.deleteOnExit() executed upon JVM exit (which may be extremely rare) details below.

2
  • 3
    deleteOnExit(), it will only trigger when the JVM terminates, so it won't trigger during exceptions. Because of this you need to be careful using deleteOnExit() on long-running applications such as server applications. For server applications the JVM will rarely exit. So you need to be careful of deleteOnExit() causing memory leaks. The JVM needs to keep track of all the files which it needs to delete on exit which aren't cleared because the JVM does not terminate.
    – Razzlero
    Sep 2, 2019 at 7:39
  • @Razzlero thanks for pointing out that it delete files only upon JVM exit. However it's not memory leak, it works as designed.
    – andrej
    Sep 3, 2019 at 8:47
9

You can also use the Apache Commons IO library and the FileUtils class. In case you are using maven you can load it using the above dependency.

<dependency>
    <groupId>commons-io</groupId>
    <artifactId>commons-io</artifactId>
    <version>2.4</version>
</dependency>

The source for the MultipartFile save to disk.

File file = new File(directory, filename);

// Create the file using the touch method of the FileUtils class.
// FileUtils.touch(file);

// Write bytes from the multipart file to disk.
FileUtils.writeByteArrayToFile(file, multipartFile.getBytes());
2
  • FileUtils.touch() is both pointless and wasteful here. You are now obliging new FileOutputStream() (via the OS) to both delete the file so created and create a new one.
    – user207421
    Sep 6, 2016 at 1:16
  • Thank you for your comment. I checked the source of the method FileUtils.writeByteArrayToFile. I think that this method is not re-creating the file in case it exists (version 2.4). The multipartFile object includes the bytes of the uploaded file that we want to store somewhere in the filesystem. My purpose is to store this bytes to a preferred location. The only reason I keep the FileUtils.touch method is to make clear that this is a new file. The FileUtils.writeByteArrayToFile creates the file (and the full path) in case it doesn't exist so the FileUtils.touch is not required. Sep 12, 2016 at 10:10
2

You can access tempfile in Spring by casting if the class of interface MultipartFile is CommonsMultipartFile.

public File getTempFile(MultipartFile multipartFile)
{
    CommonsMultipartFile commonsMultipartFile = (CommonsMultipartFile) multipartFile;
    FileItem fileItem = commonsMultipartFile.getFileItem();
    DiskFileItem diskFileItem = (DiskFileItem) fileItem;
    String absPath = diskFileItem.getStoreLocation().getAbsolutePath();
    File file = new File(absPath);

    //trick to implicitly save on disk small files (<10240 bytes by default)
    if (!file.exists()) {
        file.createNewFile();
        multipartFile.transferTo(file);
    }

    return file;
}

To get rid of the trick with files less than 10240 bytes maxInMemorySize property can be set to 0 in @Configuration @EnableWebMvc class. After that, all uploaded files will be stored on disk.

@Bean(name = "multipartResolver")
    public CommonsMultipartResolver createMultipartResolver() {
        CommonsMultipartResolver resolver = new CommonsMultipartResolver();
        resolver.setDefaultEncoding("utf-8");
        resolver.setMaxInMemorySize(0);
        return resolver;
    }
4
  • 2
    createNewFIle() is both pointless and wasteful here. You are now obliging new FileOutputStream() (via the OS) to both delete the file so created and create a new one.
    – user207421
    Sep 6, 2016 at 1:15
  • @EJP yes, it was pointless, now i fix this mistake made while editing. But createNewFIle() is not wasteful, because if CommonsMultipartFile is less than 10240 bytes, the file in filesystem is not created. So a new file with any unique name (i used the name of DiskFileItem) should be created in the FS.
    – Alex78191
    Sep 12, 2016 at 23:23
  • @Alex78191 What you mean by implicitly save on disk small files (<10240 bytes by default). Is there anyway to increase the limit Sep 29, 2016 at 14:14
  • @AnandTagore I mean that MultipartFile's less than 10240 bytes isn't saving in the file system, so Files should be created manually.
    – Alex78191
    Sep 29, 2016 at 15:55
1

Single line answer using Apache Commons.

FileUtils.copyInputStreamToFile(multipartFile.getInputStream(), file);

0

The answer by Alex78191 has worked for me.

public File getTempFile(MultipartFile multipartFile)
{

CommonsMultipartFile commonsMultipartFile = (CommonsMultipartFile) multipartFile;
FileItem fileItem = commonsMultipartFile.getFileItem();
DiskFileItem diskFileItem = (DiskFileItem) fileItem;
String absPath = diskFileItem.getStoreLocation().getAbsolutePath();
File file = new File(absPath);

//trick to implicitly save on disk small files (<10240 bytes by default)

if (!file.exists()) {
    file.createNewFile();
    multipartFile.transferTo(file);
}

return file;
}

For uploading files having size greater than 10240 bytes please change the maxInMemorySize in multipartResolver to 1MB.

<bean id="multipartResolver"
    class="org.springframework.web.multipart.commons.CommonsMultipartResolver">
<!-- setting maximum upload size t 20MB -->
<property name="maxUploadSize" value="20971520" />
<!-- max size of file in memory (in bytes) -->
<property name="maxInMemorySize" value="1048576" />
<!-- 1MB --> </bean>
4
  • maxInMemorySize has nothing to do with the limitation on file upload size. File upload size is set by the maxUploadSize property.
    – Alex78191
    Feb 23, 2017 at 5:03
  • 1
    To get rid of the trick with files less than 10240 bytes maxInMemorySize prop can be set to 0.
    – Alex78191
    Feb 23, 2017 at 5:04
  • @Alex78191 I have changed this and it worked for me. I had used your code for converting the file. So I changed the properties in the applicationcontext.xml to get rid of the memory limitations. And it works !!! Apr 9, 2017 at 17:41
  • While creating a file from multipart file, it should be kept in memory. So for that I have to increase the maxInMemorySize. May 23, 2018 at 7:11
0

if you don't want to use MultipartFile.transferTo(). You can write file like this

    val dir = File(filePackagePath)
    if (!dir.exists()) dir.mkdirs()

    val file = File("$filePackagePath${multipartFile.originalFilename}").apply {
        createNewFile()
    }

    FileOutputStream(file).use {
        it.write(multipartFile.bytes)
    }
0

MultipartFile can get InputStream.

multipartFile.getInputStream()

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.