19

If I have two parametrized fixtures, how can I create a single test function that is called first with the instances of one fixture and then with the instances of the other fixture?

I guess it would make sense to create a new fixture that somehow concatenates the two existing fixtures. This works well for "normal" fixtures, but I don't seem to get it to work with parametrized fixtures.

Here is a simplified example of what I tried:

import pytest

@pytest.fixture(params=[1, 2, 3])
def lower(request):
    return "i" * request.param

@pytest.fixture(params=[1, 2])
def upper(request):
    return "I" * request.param

@pytest.fixture(params=['lower', 'upper'])
def all(request):
    return request.getfuncargvalue(request.param)

def test_all(all):
    assert 0, all

When I run this I get this error:

request = <SubRequest 'lower' for <Function 'test_all[lower]'>>

    @pytest.fixture(params=[1, 2, 3])
    def lower(request):
>       return "i" * request.param
E       AttributeError: 'SubRequest' object has no attribute 'param'

... and the same error for upper().

What did I do wrong?

How can I fix this?


UPDATE:

There is a PyTest plugin that can be used to solve this problem: https://github.com/TvoroG/pytest-lazy-fixture.

After pip-installing this plugin, the only necessary change to the above code is the following:

@pytest.fixture(params=[pytest.lazy_fixture('lower'),
                        pytest.lazy_fixture('upper')])
def all(request):
    return request.param

Note, however, that there are some complex cases in which it will not work:

https://github.com/pytest-dev/pytest/issues/3244#issuecomment-369836702

Related PyTest issues:

4
  • 1
    I saw that there is an issue on the py.test tracker which would probably solve my problem, but there wasn't yet a response from the py.test devs.
    – Matthias
    Commented Jun 21, 2014 at 11:44
  • There is another issue which seems related to my question, but no response either ...
    – Matthias
    Commented Jun 23, 2014 at 17:54
  • 2
    The pytest-lazy-fixture plugin lets you do this. Commented Jul 10, 2018 at 18:35
  • 1
    @ChristianLong Thanks for the hint! I've added some information above.
    – Matthias
    Commented Jul 12, 2018 at 13:34

3 Answers 3

8

There is now a solution available in pytest-cases, named fixture_union. Here is how you create the fixture union that you requested in your example:

from pytest_cases import fixture_union, pytest_fixture_plus

@pytest_fixture_plus(params=[1, 2, 3])
def lower(request):
    return "i" * request.param

@pytest_fixture_plus(params=[1, 2])
def upper(request):
    return "I" * request.param

fixture_union('all', ['lower', 'upper'])

def test_all(all):
    print(all)

It works as expected:

<...>::test_all[lower-1] 
<...>::test_all[lower-2] 
<...>::test_all[lower-3] 
<...>::test_all[upper-1] 
<...>::test_all[upper-2] 

Note that I used pytest_fixture_plus in the above example because if you use pytest.fixture you will have to handle yourself the cases where a fixture is not actually used. This is done as follows, for example for the upper fixture:

import pytest
from pytest_cases import NOT_USED

@pytest.fixture(params=[1, 2])
def upper(request):
    # this fixture does not use pytest_fixture_plus 
    # so we have to explicitly discard the 'NOT_USED' cases
    if request.param is not NOT_USED:
        return "I" * request.param

See documentation for details. (I'm the author by the way ;) )

3

I had the exact same question (and received a similar, but distinct answer). The best solution I was able to come up with was to reconsider how I parametrize my tests. Instead of having multiple fixtures with compatible outputs, I used the fixtures as regular functions, and just parametrized your meta-fixture to accept the function name and arguments:

import pytest

def lower(n):
    return 'i' * n

def upper(n):
    return 'I' * n

@pytest.fixture(params=[
    (lower, 1),
    (lower, 2),
    (upper, 1),
    (upper, 2),
    (upper, 3),
])
def all(request):
    func, *n = request.param
    return func(*n)

def test_all(all):
    ...

In your particular case, unpacking n into a list and passing it with * is slightly overkill, but it provides generality. My case has fixtures that all accept different parameter lists.

Until pytest allows us to properly chain fixtures, this is the only way I have come up with to run 5 tests instead of 12 in your situation. You can make the list shorter with something like

@pytest.fixture(params=[
    *[(lower, i) for i in range(1, 3)],
    *[(upper, i) for i in range(1, 4)],
])

There is an actual advantage of doing it this way. You can pick and chose which tests you want to do special things to, like XFAIL, without affecting a whole swath of other tests if you have additional dependencies in your pipeline.

1
  • 2
    Well the main point of fixtures is that they can be re-used, right? And if I create a parametrized fixture, I also want to re-use the parametrization (because it's part of the fixture). The way you suggest it, I can't re-use the parametrization. Imagine there are more fixtures like lower and upper and I want to make several different combinations of them. The lazy_fixture plugin lets me do exactly that without having to manually repeat anything.
    – Matthias
    Commented Sep 15, 2018 at 8:24
1

It is not beautiful, but may be today you know the better way.

Request object inside 'all' fixture know only about own params: 'lower', 'upper'. One way using fixtures from a fixture function.

import pytest

@pytest.fixture(params=[1, 2, 3])
def lower(request):
    return "i" * request.param

@pytest.fixture(params=[1, 2])
def upper(request):
    return "I" * request.param

@pytest.fixture(params=['lower', 'upper'])
def all(request, lower, upper):
    if request.param == 'lower':
        return lower
    else:
        return upper

def test_all(all):
    assert 0, all
1
  • 7
    Thanks for the answer! But using both lower and upper as function arguments for all() runs the tests for all combinations (I guess more accurately the Cartesian product) of lower() and upper(), i.e. 6 times. Adding two params to all() doubles the number, i.e. test_all() runs 12 times. I would like to have only the concatenation of lower() and upper(), i.e. running the test only 5 times.
    – Matthias
    Commented Apr 2, 2015 at 14:51

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