36

I know that calling $digest or $apply manually during a digest cycle will cause a "$digest already in progress" error but I have no idea why I am getting it here.

This is a unit test for a service that wraps $http, the service is simple enough, it just prevents making duplicate calls to the server while ensuring that code that attempts to do the calls still gets the data it expected.

angular.module('services')
    .factory('httpService', ['$http', function($http) {

        var pendingCalls = {};

        var createKey = function(url, data, method) {
            return method + url + JSON.stringify(data);
        };

        var send = function(url, data, method) {
            var key = createKey(url, data, method);
            if (pendingCalls[key]) {
                return pendingCalls[key];
            }
            var promise = $http({
                method: method,
                url: url,
                data: data
            });
            pendingCalls[key] = promise;
            promise.then(function() {
                delete pendingCalls[key];
            });
            return promise;
        };

        return {
            post: function(url, data) {
                return send(url, data, 'POST');
            },
            get: function(url, data) {
                return send(url, data, 'GET');
            },
            _delete: function(url, data) {
                return send(url, data, 'DELETE');
            }
        };
    }]);

The unit-test is also pretty straight forward, it uses $httpBackend to expect the request.

it('does GET requests', function(done) {
    $httpBackend.expectGET('/some/random/url').respond('The response');

    service.get('/some/random/url').then(function(result) {
        expect(result.data).toEqual('The response');
        done();
    });
    $httpBackend.flush();
});

This blows up as sone as done() gets called with a "$digest already in progress" error. I've no idea why. I can solve this by wrapping done() in a timeout like this

setTimeout(function() { done() }, 1);

That means done() will get queued up and run after the $digest is done but while that solves my problem I want to know

  • Why is Angular in a digest-cycle in the first place?
  • Why does calling done() trigger this error?

I had the exact same test running green with Jasmine 1.3, this only happened after I upgraded to Jasmine 2.0 and rewrote the test to use the new async-syntax.

  • what is done()? – Khanh TO Jun 21 '14 at 12:24
  • It's the new way to deal with async tests in Jasmine 2.0. It get's injected into the test-function and if you have not called it within 5 seconds the test fails. See jasmine.github.io/2.0/… – ivarni Jun 21 '14 at 12:25
  • There was no separate tag for jasmine 2.0, or I would have tagged it. I can see how the syntax is confusing if you've not seen it before. – ivarni Jun 21 '14 at 12:27
  • OK, I spent nearly all day yesterday on this, but I do think I figured it out. I will add it as an answer, and I may be wrong. – deitch Oct 8 '14 at 8:00
  • @deitch that looks like some nice research, I'll see if I confirm what you found. – ivarni Oct 8 '14 at 8:15
74

$httpBacked.flush() actually starts and completes a $digest() cycle. I spent all day yesterday digging into the source of ngResource and angular-mocks to get to the bottom of this, and still don't fully understand it.

As far as I can tell, the purpose of $httpBackend.flush() is to avoid the async structure above entirely. In other words, the syntax of it('should do something',function(done){}); and $httpBackend.flush() do not play nicely together. The very purpose of .flush() is to push through the pending async callbacks and then return. It is like one big done wrapper around all of your async callbacks.

So if I understood correctly (and it works for me now) the correct method would be to remove the done() processor when using $httpBackend.flush():

it('does GET requests', function() {
    $httpBackend.expectGET('/some/random/url').respond('The response');

    service.get('/some/random/url').then(function(result) {
        expect(result.data).toEqual('The response');
    });
    $httpBackend.flush();
});

If you add console.log statements, you will find that all of the callbacks consistently happen during the flush() cycle:

it('does GET requests', function() {
    $httpBackend.expectGET('/some/random/url').respond('The response');

    console.log("pre-get");
    service.get('/some/random/url').then(function(result) {
        console.log("async callback begin");
        expect(result.data).toEqual('The response');
        console.log("async callback end");
    });
    console.log("pre-flush");
    $httpBackend.flush();
    console.log("post-flush");
});

Then the output will be:

pre-get

pre-flush

async callback begin

async callback end

post-flush

Every time. If you really want to see it, grab the scope and look at scope.$$phase

var scope;
beforeEach(function(){
    inject(function($rootScope){
        scope = $rootScope;
    });
});
it('does GET requests', function() {
    $httpBackend.expectGET('/some/random/url').respond('The response');

    console.log("pre-get "+scope.$$phase);
    service.get('/some/random/url').then(function(result) {
        console.log("async callback begin "+scope.$$phase);
        expect(result.data).toEqual('The response');
        console.log("async callback end "+scope.$$phase);
    });
    console.log("pre-flush "+scope.$$phase);
    $httpBackend.flush();
    console.log("post-flush "+scope.$$phase);
});

And you will see the output:

pre-get undefined

pre-flush undefined

async callback begin $digest

async callback end $digest

post-flush undefined

  • Yup, that seems to work and at least to me the explanation makes sense as well. Thanks! – ivarni Oct 8 '14 at 9:26
  • Brilliant, solved the problem for me also. – Forge_7 Oct 22 '14 at 13:18
  • If I could upvote this more than once I would. This saved me from digging through the source after banging my head on it all morning. Cheers! – spikeheap Apr 24 '15 at 10:39
  • Months later, and still you made my day. I am really glad all that work digging helped others. – deitch Apr 24 '15 at 11:39
  • Wow, this has been driving me crazy this afternoon. Once again, the angular docs let me down. Maybe the answer's in there, but it's not obvious. Thanks for a great answer! – markrian May 18 '15 at 18:22
12

@deitch is right, that $httpBacked.flush() triggers a digest. The problem is that when $httpBackend.verifyNoOutstandingExpectation(); is run after each it is completed it also has a digest. So here's the sequence of events:

  1. you call flush() which triggers a digest
  2. the then() is executed
  3. the done() is executed
  4. verifyNoOutstandingExpectation() is run which triggers a digest, but you are already in one so you get an error.

done() is still important since we need to know that the 'expects' within the then() are even executed. If the then doesn't run then you might now know there were failures. The key is to make sure the digest is complete before firing the done().

it('does GET requests', function(done) {
    $httpBackend.expectGET('/some/random/url').respond('The response');

    service.get('/some/random/url').then(function(result) {
        expect(result.data).toEqual('The response');
        setTimeout(done, 0); // run the done() after the current $digest is complete.
    });
    $httpBackend.flush();
});

Putting done() in a timeout will make it executes immediately after the current digest is complete(). This will ensure that all of the expects that you wanted to run will actually run.

  • The setTimeout solution was what I was trying to avoid in the first place :) – ivarni Oct 23 '15 at 21:23
  • 3
    You can put verifyNoOutstandingExpectation() in a timeout in your afterEach to make your 'it' cleaner instead. – Matt Slocum Oct 24 '15 at 14:43
1

Adding to @deitch's answer. To make the tests more robust you can add a spy before your callback. This should guarantee that your callback actually gets called.

it('does GET requests', function() {
  var callback = jasmine.createSpy().and.callFake(function(result) {
    expect(result.data).toEqual('The response');
  });

  $httpBackend.expectGET('/some/random/url').respond('The response');
  service.get('/some/random/url').then(callback);
  $httpBackend.flush();

  expect(callback).toHaveBeenCalled();
});

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