92

I'm going crazy: Where is the Ruby function for factorial? No, I don't need tutorial implementations, I just want the function from the library. It's not in Math!

I'm starting to doubt, is it a standard library function?

9
  • 64
    I do it like 6.downto(1).inject(:*)
    – mckeed
    Mar 12, 2010 at 17:26
  • 44
    @mckeed: Or (1..6).inject(:*) which is a bit more succinct.
    – sepp2k
    Mar 12, 2010 at 17:30
  • 8
    why would you expect there to be one? Mar 13, 2010 at 0:43
  • 4
    I wonder what the status is of mathematics and science libraries for Ruby. Jun 15, 2011 at 3:10
  • 5
    Just a note on the provided examples using inject. (1..num).inject(:*) fails for the case where num == 0. (1..(num.zero? ? 1 : num)).inject(:*) gives the correct answer for the 0 case and returns nil for negative parameters.
    – Yogh
    Dec 20, 2011 at 9:19

20 Answers 20

140

There is no factorial function in the standard library.

2
117

Like this is better

(1..n).inject(:*) || 1
1
  • 36
    Or specify the initial value directly: (1..n).reduce(1, :*). Feb 25, 2015 at 5:39
77

It's not in the standard library but you can extend the Integer class.

class Integer
  def factorial_recursive
    self <= 1 ? 1 : self * (self - 1).factorial
  end
  def factorial_iterative
    f = 1; for i in 1..self; f *= i; end; f
  end
  alias :factorial :factorial_iterative
end

N.B. Iterative factorial is a better choice for obvious performance reasons.

5
  • 8
    He explicitly said, he doesn't want an implementation.
    – sepp2k
    Mar 12, 2010 at 17:26
  • 118
    He may not; but people searching SO for "Ruby factorial" might. Mar 12, 2010 at 17:49
  • 1
    rosettacode.org/wiki/Factorial#Ruby is just wrong. There isn't a case for 0 Apr 24, 2013 at 22:42
  • Is the recursive version actually slower? It might depend on whether Ruby does tail-recursive optimization. Aug 12, 2018 at 0:05
  • I don't believe the recursive version is actually recursive. It calls factorial, which is aliased to factorial_iterative. It never recurses into itself. So it's indirectly iterative. Aug 17, 2021 at 18:58
29

Shamelessly cribbed from http://rosettacode.org/wiki/Factorial#Ruby, my personal favorite is

class Integer
  def fact
    (1..self).reduce(:*) || 1
  end
end

>> 400.fact
=> 64034522846623895262347970319503005850702583026002959458684445942802397169186831436278478647463264676294350575035856810848298162883517435228961988646802997937341654150838162426461942352307046244325015114448670890662773914918117331955996440709549671345290477020322434911210797593280795101545372667251627877890009349763765710326350331533965349868386831339352024373788157786791506311858702618270169819740062983025308591298346162272304558339520759611505302236086810433297255194852674432232438669948422404232599805551610635942376961399231917134063858996537970147827206606320217379472010321356624613809077942304597360699567595836096158715129913822286578579549361617654480453222007825818400848436415591229454275384803558374518022675900061399560145595206127211192918105032491008000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000

This implementation also happens to be the fastest among the variants listed in Rosetta Code.

update #1

Added || 1 to handle the zero case.

update #2

With thanks and appreciation to Mark Thomas, here's a version that is a bit more efficient, elegant and obscure:

class Integer
  def fact
    (2..self).reduce(1,:*)
  end
end
5
  • 1
    what the heck does that mean?! yeah it's fast but its very unuserfriendly though
    – chip
    May 17, 2012 at 13:19
  • 3
    it's also incorrect for 0! - should be something like: if self <= 1; 1; else; (1..self).reduce(:*); end
    – Tarmo
    May 21, 2012 at 19:55
  • 9
    @allen - Don't blame the language if you can't understand it. It simply means, take the range 1 to self, then remove the first element (1) from it (i.e. that's what reduce means in functional programming). Then remove the first element of what's left (2) and multiply (:*) those together. Now remove the first element from what's left (3) and multiply that with the running total. Keep going until there's nothing left (i.e. you've handled the entire range). If reduce fails (because the array is empty in the case of 0!) then just return 1 anyway. Dec 17, 2013 at 23:11
  • You can also handle the zero case by specifying the initial value in reduce: (1..self).reduce(1,:*). Feb 1, 2018 at 15:26
  • 3
    Actually you can use (2..self).reduce(1,:*), if micro-efficiency is your thing :) Feb 1, 2018 at 15:28
16

In math, factorial of n is just the gamma function of n+1
(see: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gamma_function)

Ruby has Math.gamma() so just use Math.gamma(n+1) and cast it back to an integer if desired.

14

You could also use Math.gamma function which boils down to factorial for integer parameters.

3
  • 3
    From the docs: "Note that gamma(n) is same as fact(n-1) for integer n > 0. However gamma(n) returns float and can be an approximation". If one takes that into account, it works, but the reduce solution seems a lot more straight forward. Jan 2, 2012 at 15:51
  • Thanks for this! My gut says to use towards the standard library over a custom-written reduce whenever possible. Profiling might suggest otherwise.
    – David J.
    Sep 18, 2012 at 17:31
  • 2
    Note: It's O(1) and precise for 0..22: MRI Ruby actually performs a lookup for those values (see static const double fact_table[] in the source). Beyond that, its an approximation. 23!, for instance, requires a 56-bit mantissa which is impossible to represent precisely using he IEEE 754 double which has a 53-bit mantissas.
    – fny
    Mar 17, 2014 at 20:02
13
class Integer
  def !
    (1..self).inject(:*)
  end
end

examples

!3  # => 6
!4  # => 24
5
  • What’s wrong with class Integer ; def ! ; (1..self).inject(:*) ; end ; end? Jun 21, 2016 at 12:53
  • @mudasobwa I like it, I have refactored for simplicity. Jul 18, 2016 at 19:14
  • 4
    I'd respectfully suggest that overriding an instance method incorporated into all Ruby objects to return a truthy value, rather than a falsy one may not make you many friends.
    – MatzFan
    Oct 3, 2017 at 15:20
  • It might be really dangerous to make the negate operator to become something else when a happens to be Integer in the case of !a... doing so may cause a bug to exist which is very hard to tell. If a happens to be a big number such as 357264543 then the processor is going into a big loop and people may wonder why the program all of a sudden becomes slow Jul 8, 2019 at 7:19
  • This answer was more just a cool thing to share rather than a practical example to use. Jul 9, 2019 at 17:57
9

I would do

(1..n).inject(1, :*)
6

I just wrote my own:

def fact(n)
  if n<= 1
    1
  else
    n * fact( n - 1 )
  end
end

Also, you can define a falling factorial:

def fall_fact(n,k)
  if k <= 0
    1
  else
    n*fall_fact(n - 1, k - 1)
  end
end
4

Just call this function

def factorial(n=0)
  (1..n).inject(:*)
end

examples

factorial(3)
factorial(11)
0
4

With high respect to all who participated and spent their time to help us, I would like to share my benchmarks of the solutions listed here. Params:

iterations = 1000

n = 6

                                     user     system      total        real
Math.gamma(n+1)                   0.000383   0.000106   0.000489 (  0.000487)
(1..n).inject(:*) || 1            0.003986   0.000000   0.003986 (  0.003987)
(1..n).reduce(1, :*)              0.003926   0.000000   0.003926 (  0.004023)
1.upto(n) {|x| factorial *= x }   0.003748   0.011734   0.015482 (  0.022795)

For n = 10

  user     system      total        real
0.000378   0.000102   0.000480 (  0.000477)
0.004469   0.000007   0.004476 (  0.004491)
0.004532   0.000024   0.004556 (  0.005119)
0.027720   0.011211   0.038931 (  0.058309)
1
  • 1
    Worth noting that the fastest one Math.gamma(n+1) is also only approximate for n > 22, so may not be suitable for all use cases. Oct 16, 2019 at 12:00
3

Using Math.gamma.floor is an easy way to produce an approximation and then round it back down to the correct integer result. Should work for all Integers, include an input check if necessary.

1
  • 6
    Correction: After n = 22 it ceases to give an exact answer and produces approximations.
    – Ayarch
    Jan 10, 2014 at 18:16
1

Just another way to do it, although it really isn't necessary.

class Factorial
   attr_reader :num
   def initialize(num)
      @num = num
   end

   def find_factorial
      (1..num).inject(:*) || 1
   end
end

number = Factorial.new(8).find_factorial
puts number
1

You will probably find a Ruby feature request useful. It contains a nontrivial patch that includes a demo Bash script. The speed difference between a naive loop and the solution presented in the batch can be literally 100x (hundred fold). Written all in pure Ruby.

1

Here is my version seems to be clear to me even though it's not as clean.

def factorial(num)
    step = 0
    (num - 1).times do (step += 1 ;num *= step) end
    return num
end

This was my irb testing line that showed each step.

num = 8;step = 0;(num - 1).times do (step += 1 ;num *= step; puts num) end;num
1

Why would the standard library require a factorial method, when there is a built-in iterator for this exact purpose? It is called upto.

No you do not need to use recursion, like all these other answers show.

def fact(n)
  n == 0 ? 1 : n * fact(n - 1)
end  

Rather, the built-in iterator upto can be used to calculate factorials:

factorial = 1
1.upto(10) {|x| factorial *= x }
factorial
 => 3628800
1
  • I like it but it's useful up to 50,000; anything higher is not a match for.
    – Pablo
    Jan 22 at 15:33
0
class Integer
  def factorial
    return self < 0 ? false : self==0 ? 1 : self.downto(1).inject(:*)
    #Not sure what other libraries say, but my understanding is that factorial of 
    #anything less than 0 does not exist.
  end
end
0

And yet another way (=

def factorial(number)
  number = number.to_i
  number_range = (number).downto(1).to_a
  factorial = number_range.inject(:*)
  puts "The factorial of #{number} is #{factorial}"
end
factorial(#number)
0

Just one more way to do it:

# fact(n) => Computes the Factorial of "n" = n!

def fact(n) (1..n).inject(1) {|r,i| r*i }end

fact(6) => 720
0

In Ruby standard library function for factorial is not available. We can make a simple function of factorial in ruby in this way.

def factorial_number(n)
 if n <= 1
    1
 else
    n * factorial_number(n-1)
  end
end

puts factorial_number(6) #Output is 720   => (6*5*4*3*2*1)
puts factorial_number(8) #Output is 40320 => (8*7*6*5*4*3*2*1)
5
  • Outputs 0 when tried with 5 May 11 at 13:04
  • Oh nevermind it worked with a fix May 11 at 13:05
  • @RixTheTyrunt It worked with a fix. when we try any number in factorail_number(n). like factorial_number(5). Return 120 May 12 at 7:52
  • I replaced all 1 and <= but it returned 0 when tried with any number May 12 at 9:56
  • @RixTheTyrunt Do you use:- puts factorial_number(5)? and getting 0.? May 13 at 5:18

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