Can anyone tell me which is the best algorithm to find the value of determinant of a matrix of size N x N?

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    Do we know more about the matrix other than the size. Is it sparse? – wcm Mar 12 '10 at 19:15
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    Despite the tagging the answers to stackoverflow.com/questions/1886280/… are language agnostic, so I propose that this is a duplicate. – dmckee Mar 12 '10 at 19:42
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    Matrix algorithms are sufficiently complex so that you ought not implement them yourself; use a well-established library like LAPACK. The people who write the library will already have chosen the best implementation for determinant (probably LU decomposition for a dense matrix). – Rex Kerr Mar 12 '10 at 22:35
  • What algorithm does numpy use? – sayantankhan Sep 23 '13 at 12:26

Here is an extensive discussion.

There are a lot of algorithms.

A simple one is to take the LU decomposition. Then, since

 det M = det LU = det L * det U

and both L and U are triangular, the determinant is a product of the diagonal elements of L and U. That is O(n^3). There exist more efficient algorithms.

If you did an initial research, you've probably found that with N>=4, calculation of a matrix determinant becomes quite complex. Regarding algorithms, I would point you to Wikipedia article on Matrix determinants, specifically the "Algorithmic Implementation" section.

From my own experience, you can easily find a LU or QR decomposition algorithm in existing matrix libraries such as Alglib. The algorithm itself is not quite simple though.

Row Reduction

The simplest way (and not a bad way, really) to find the determinant of an nxn matrix is by row reduction. By keeping in mind a few simple rules about determinants, we can solve in the form:

det(A) = α * det(R), where R is the row echelon form of the original matrix A, and α is some coefficient.

Finding the determinant of a matrix in row echelon form is really easy; you just find the product of the diagonal. Solving the determinant of the original matrix A then just boils down to calculating α as you find the row echelon form R.

What You Need to Know

What is row echelon form?

See this link for a simple definition
Note: Not all definitions require 1s for the leading entries, and it is unnecessary for this algorithm.

You Can Find R Using Elementary Row Operations

Swapping rows, adding multiples of another row, etc.

You Derive α from Properties of Row Operations for Determinants

  1. If B is a matrix obtained by multiplying a row of A by some non-zero constant ß, then

    det(B) = ß * det(A)

    • In other words, you can essentially 'factor out' a constant from a row by just pulling it out front of the determinant.
  2. If B is a matrix obtained by swapping two rows of A, then

    det(B) = -det(A)

    • If you swap rows, flip the sign.
  3. If B is a matrix obtained by adding a multiple of one row to another row in A, then

    det(B) = det(A)

    • The determinant doesn't change.

Note that you can find the determinant, in most cases, with only Rule 3 (when the diagonal of A has no zeros, I believe), and in all cases with only Rules 2 and 3. Rule 1 is helpful for humans doing math on paper, trying to avoid fractions.

Example

(I do unnecessary steps to demonstrate each rule more clearly)
| 2 3 3 1 | A=| 0 4 3 -3 | | 2 -1 -1 -3 | | 0 -4 -3 2 | R2 <-> R3, -α -> α (Rule 2) | 2 3 3 1 | -| 2 -1 -1 -3 | | 0 4 3 -3 | | 0 -4 -3 2 | R2 - R1 -> R2 (Rule 3) | 2 3 3 1 | -| 0 -4 -4 -4 | | 0 4 3 -3 | | 0 -4 -3 2 | R2/(-4) -> R2, -4α -> α (Rule 1) | 2 3 3 1 | 4| 0 1 1 1 | | 0 4 3 -3 | | 0 -4 -3 2 | R3 - 4R2 -> R3, R4 + 4R2 -> R4 (Rule 3, applied twice) | 2 3 3 1 | 4| 0 1 1 1 | | 0 0 -1 -7 | | 0 0 1 6 | R4 + R3 -> R3 | 2 3 3 1 | 4| 0 1 1 1 | = 4 ( 2 * 1 * -1 * -1 ) = 8 | 0 0 -1 -7 | | 0 0 0 -1 |

I am not too familiar with LU factorization, but I know that in order to get either L or U, you need to make the initial matrix triangular (either upper triangular for U or lower triangular for L). However, once you get the matrix in triangular form for some nxn matrix A and assuming the only operation your code uses is Rb - k*Ra, you can just solve det(A) = Π T(i,i) from i=0 to n (i.e. det(A) = T(0,0) x T(1,1) x ... x T(n,n)) for the triangular matrix T. Check this link to see what I'm talking about. http://matrix.reshish.com/determinant.php

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