72

What is the best way to define constants that may be used by a number of classes within a namespace? I'm trying to avoid too much inheritance, so extending base classes is not an ideal solution, and I'm struggling to find a good solution using traits. Is this in any way possible in PHP 5.4 or should a different approach be taken?

I have the following situation:

trait Base
{
    // Generic functions
}

class A 
{
    use Base;
}

class B 
{
    use Base;
}

The problem is that it is not possible to define constants in PHP traits. Ideally, I would want something like the following:

trait Base
{
    const SOME_CONST = 'someconst';
    const SOME_OTHER_CONST = 'someotherconst';

    // Generic functions
}

Then these could be accessed though the class that applies the trait:

echo A::SOME_CONST;
echo B::SOME_OTHER_CONST;

But due to the limitations of traits this isn't possible. Any ideas?

5
  • 6
    You can use static properties, it's not a constant but it's also only one character different in calling it... public static $SOME_VAR = 'someconst'; and echo B::$SOME_VAR
    – scrowler
    Jun 23 '14 at 3:25
  • Thanks for the tip. That is one option although this is a refactor job, and not new code so I'd prefer the behavior to stay the same rather than update all the constant calls (there are a lot of them).
    – Tom Jowitt
    Jun 23 '14 at 3:37
  • 9
    You could use interface to declare consts.
    – sectus
    Jun 23 '14 at 4:48
  • 3
    bugs.php.net/bug.php?id=70986
    – bishop
    Apr 4 '16 at 16:40
  • 3
    bugs.php.net/bug.php?id=70986 has been superseded by bugs.php.net/bug.php?id=75060 now
    – caw
    Feb 6 '18 at 21:49
103

I ended up using user sectus's suggestion of interfaces as it feels like the least-problematic way of handling this. Using an interface to store constants rather than API contracts has a bad smell about it though so maybe this issue is more about OO design than trait implementation.

interface Definition
{
    const SOME_CONST = 'someconst';
    const SOME_OTHER_CONST = 'someotherconst';
}

trait Base
{
    // Generic functions
}

class A implements Definition
{
    use Base;
}

class B implements Definition
{
    use Base;
}

Which allows for:

A::SOME_CONST;
B::SOME_CONST;
8
  • 93
    So interfaces can have constants...but traits can't? PHP gets weirder and weirder. Jun 10 '15 at 19:17
  • 8
    @Adambean overriding a constant defeats the purpose of the constant, it isn't meant to change.
    – aknosis
    Feb 8 '18 at 18:55
  • 1
    Yet if I want to use a value within the trait's code implementation, it's not possible.
    – SOFe
    May 4 '18 at 15:28
  • 5
    @Aknosis I personally see it more than a constant doesn't change value during its lifecycle. That doesn't mean it cannot be redefined with another value, when extending a class (and use [e.g.] static::VALIDATION_REGEX to get the late-static-bound value) Aug 29 '18 at 15:06
  • 1
    PHP 'bug' #75060
    – Jake
    Jun 21 '20 at 1:13
42

You could also use static variables. They can be used in the class or the trait itself. - Works fine for me as a replacement for const.

trait myTrait {
    static $someVarA = "my specific content";
    static $someVarB = "my second specific content";
}

class myCustomClass {
    use myTrait;

    public function hello()
    {
        return self::$someVarA;
    }
}
2
  • 13
    I know this is old, but dont you want to use const to not be able to change the value?
    – visualex
    Aug 2 '16 at 14:30
  • 2
    You can't use constants in a Trait.
    – cawhite78
    May 9 '17 at 16:47
10

To limit the scope of your constants, you can define them inside a namespace:

namespace Test;

const Foo = 123;

// generic functions or classes

echo Foo;
echo namespace\Foo;

A downside of this approach is that autoloading won't work for constants, at least not for 5.4; the typical way around this is to wrap those constants in a static class, i.e.:

namespace Test;

class Bar
{
    const Foo = 123;
}
2
  • Interesting idea. I didn't realise you could access namespaced constants directly. The problem is this library is PSR-0 autoloaded so I'm afraid this approach wouldn't work. Thanks for the answer though.
    – Tom Jowitt
    Jun 24 '14 at 3:03
  • 1
    @orciny Well, autoloading would work if you wrap those constants inside a static class; not the shiniest example of beautiful code, but it would work :)
    – Ja͢ck
    Jun 24 '14 at 3:06
9

Not a good one, but maybe...

trait Base
{
    public static function SOME_CONST()
    {
        return 'value1';
    }

    public static function SOME_OTHER_CONST()
    {
        return 'value2';
    }

    // generic functions
}

class A
{
    use Base;
}

class B
{
    use Base;
}

echo A::SOME_CONST();
echo B::SOME_OTHER_CONST();
2
  • Note to those that didn't follow, these are static methods, not constants.. they look a bit like constants when used though. If you were to do this and you wanted these methods to behave more like constants, you would want to prefix the methods with the keyword final to ensure they couldn't be overriden (same behaviour as constants).
    – John Hunt
    Mar 5 '20 at 14:50
  • 2
    @John Hunt, final doesn't work for traits, see stackoverflow.com/a/33481511/251735
    – Jekis
    Mar 9 '20 at 5:43
-3

Something else to consider is whether or not you can use an abstract class instead, and then inherit.

abstract class Base
{
    const A = 1;
    const B = 2;
}

class Class1 extends Base {}
class Class2 extends Base {}

echo Class1::A;
echo Class2::B;

Of course, part of the reason for traits is replace complex inheritance trees with composition. Depends on the situation.

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